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xmelissaa

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I love watching these types of convos! :) Enjoy and tell me what you think

 
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Although I am enamored with Ancient Greek history, I am slowly getting more and more intrigued by the country's modern history. Thanks for sharing this!
 
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Although I am enamored with Ancient Greek history, I am slowly getting more and more intrigued by the country's modern history. Thanks for sharing this!
I would have to agree with you, especially since the modern history has the most impact on modern Greek culture today
 
I would have to agree with you, especially since the modern history has the most impact on modern Greek culture today
That's an excellent point - the period of time from the Greek War for Independence onward is especially intriguing. Even more interesting is the role ancient history plays in modern Greece!
 
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That's an excellent point - the period of time from the Greek War for Independence onward is especially intriguing. Even more interesting is the role ancient history plays in modern Greece!
So true. That's really when Greece began forming itself as its own country
 
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That's true! Prior to that Greece was grouped regionally.
I wish some of the regional cultures weren't dying out, that's some of my favorite parts of Greek culture
 
I wish some of the regional cultures weren't dying out, that's some of my favorite parts of Greek culture
That's sad to me, that they're dying out. People maybe are moving away from the islands to find work, taking their culture with them?
 
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That's sad to me, that they're dying out. People maybe are moving away from the islands to find work, taking their culture with them?
I think it also has to do with the fact that most of the media comes from Athens so the culture is more uniform in Greece. This is happening in many countries around the world as well. It might also be nationalism. Greece probably wants the country to be more unified so its more powerful
 
I think it also has to do with the fact that most of the media comes from Athens so the culture is more uniform in Greece. This is happening in many countries around the world as well. It might also be nationalism. Greece probably wants the country to be more unified so its more powerful
This is fascinating - there are other countries where a similar unification happened, like in Germany in the 1800's. Each state was its own country at one time. There definitely is strength in numbers, and the unification can also be cultural, as well.
 

Learning about the Spartan way of life

I find the Spartans fascinating. They seemed to have a different way of life!

The Spartans, known for their military might, also led a lifestyle that was remarkably disciplined and focused on simplicity.

The core of Spartan society was its military-oriented ethos. From a young age, Spartan boys were trained to be soldiers in the agoge, a rigorous education system that emphasized physical training, endurance, and survival skills. This preparation was not just about warfare but about creating individuals who were resilient, self-sufficient, and disciplined.

But Spartan discipline extended beyond the military sphere. Spartans lived a life of austerity and frugality that is quite alien to our modern way of living. Meals were simple, homes were unadorned, and luxuries were frowned upon. This was not out of a lack of resources but a deliberate choice to avoid softness and dependency on material comforts.

Interestingly, this Spartan simplicity also fostered a sense of equality among citizens. By eschewing luxury, Spartans aimed to reduce divisions within their society. Wealth and status were downplayed, while military prowess and moral integrity were valued above all.

What do you guys think about this or what can you add to my thinking?

Interesting Greek History Topics I Like

The Persian Wars: The wars fought between Greece and the Persian empire in the 5th century BC were some of the most consequential conflicts of ancient times. Learn about the key events, such as the Battle of Marathon and the Battle of Thermopylae, and the strategies that allowed the Greeks to repel the Persian invaders.

The Rise of Athens: Arguably the most influential city-state in ancient Greece, Athens was the birthplace of democracy, philosophy, and the arts. Follow the rise of Athens from a humble village to a powerhouse of trade and culture.

The Peloponnesian War: The decades-long conflict between Athens and Sparta was a turning point in Greek history, leading to the decline of Athens and the rise of Macedon under Philip II and his son Alexander.

The Life of Alexander the Great: The young conqueror who led his armies across the known world, Alexander the Great is one of the most famous and admired figures of ancient history. Learn about his upbringing, his conquests, and his legacy.

The Olympic Games: A tradition that continues to this day, the ancient Olympics were a celebration of sports, culture, and political power. Explore the origins of the games and the events that took place.

History of the tradition of decorating boats for Christmas

One of the most interesting Greek Christmas traditions to me is the one where people decorate boats. So, I started to research the history. Here's a bit of what I discovered:

The roots of the tradition of decorating boats in Greece for Christmas can be traced back to the country's longstanding ties with the sea. In Ancient Greece, people would often looked to the sea for both sustenance and inspiration, and it was not uncommon for ships to be adorned with religious symbols and decorations.

It also has ties to early Christianity in Greece. According to Greek Orthodox beliefs, Saint Nicolas (aka Santa Claus) was a sailor, and he is the patron saint of sailors. Decorating boats is often seen as a way to honor him.

Over time, this practice became associated with the Christmas season, and the boats began to be decorated specifically for the holiday.

People also make paper boats to decorate. Some call these the "yule boat" or karavaki. One of the most famous examples of this practice is the Yule boat, or karavaki.

The earliest known evidence of decorating boats for Christmas in Greece dates back to the 19th century. During this time, sailors would deck out their boats with lights and tiny boats. These tiny boats were often placed inside the larger boat, symbolizing protection from harm while at sea.

Does anyone have anything to add?

Studying the Trojan War - Was it Real?

Did the Trojan War really happen? I am doing a bit of research and wanted to know what you guys thought:

The war is believed to have happened around 1200 BCE, and while there is no concrete evidence to support its occurrence, it is widely accepted as factual.

What is confusing me is how prevalent it is in Greek Mythology. In addition to the gods' involvement in the conflict, various stories and legends were added over time to give the tale more depth and drama. For example, the character of Achilles was said to be invulnerable except for his heel, which led to the phrase "Achilles heel" being used to describe a person's one weakness.

While some scholars once dismissed the Trojan War as pure myth, modern archaeological evidence has suggested that it may have been a real event. Excavations at the ancient site of Troy have revealed evidence of a long period of conflict and destruction, and historians have found similarities between the tale as it is told in ancient texts and what is known about the region's history at the time. While many details of the Trojan War are still shrouded in mystery, it seems increasingly likely that it was not just a legend but a real event that has been passed down through the ages.

For Ancient Greeks, Our Modern Democracy is an Oligarchy.

Share and discuss Greek history!

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