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kcixcy

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The Library’s founders wanted it to be a repository of knowledge, so they sent agents with large sums of money to buy as many scrolls as possible about any subject and by any author. The Library throve for decades and became especially famous for its many works on literary criticism. The Library of Alexandria was destroyed in a war during the late 3rd century A.D.
 

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acamp7

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Wow this was when Greece was truly so successful and building some of the best knowledge bases in the world. There were books in hundreds of languages and people from all over the world would come to visit
 

Could the Parthenon marbles be returned to Greece?

There is finally some hope in the constant and ongoing battle to return the person on marbles from the United Kingdom to Greece. A new chairman has declared that there is a deal to be done in terms of the marbles. Many are very hopeful that this might be pointing to a potential return, but others have given up hope in this battle. personally, this is something that I would love to see. There are so many artifacts from around the world that are stolen and still being housed in museums in the United Kingdom. The right thing should be done, and the marbles should be returned, as should every other stolen artifact.

Did you know that dozens of ancient theaters are still operating in Greece?

Theater was a huge part of the ancient Greek civilization, and it's still important in modern Greece today. Greeks loves theater, and you were always see flyers for different shows going on. Many of these are presented in ancient amphitheatres that were built thousands of years ago. If you're in Greece, I really recommend that you check one out. There are even plays for young children.


Here is a list of showings around Greece: https://parallaximag.gr/theatro

You can use a google translate browser add on to translate the page.

History of Phyllo Dough?

I have been trying to reconnect with Greek cooking for a while now, and the thing I am working on now are the phyllo dishes - like pita and baklava. Phyllo is delicious, but it can also be tricky. During the whole process I have been curious - where did phyllo come from? I found some sources, but it's hard to really understand the true origin:


Many seem to claim that it came from different places. I have heard theories about it coming from Ancient Greece, Byzantine Empire, Medieval Turkey (but wait wasn't this Byzantine?).... What do you guys think?
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