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auroracoor1

Member
This is the description straight from the article. "Still more compelling is the reference to Greek culture in the tomb inscription. The epigraph states that Marcus Venerius Secundio “gave Greek and Latin ludi for the duration of four days”. Ludi graeci were theater performances in Greek language. “It is the first clear evidence of performances at Pompeii in the Greek language, which had previously been hypothesised on the basis of indirect indicators,” says the Director of the Archaeological Park of Pompeii, Gabriel Zuchtriegel."

 

amygdalE

Member
This is the description straight from the article. "Still more compelling is the reference to Greek culture in the tomb inscription. The epigraph states that Marcus Venerius Secundio “gave Greek and Latin ludi for the duration of four days”. Ludi graeci were theater performances in Greek language. “It is the first clear evidence of performances at Pompeii in the Greek language, which had previously been hypothesised on the basis of indirect indicators,” says the Director of the Archaeological Park of Pompeii, Gabriel Zuchtriegel."

That is an extraordinary discovery because it implies that, if plays were performed in Greek, there must have been a Greek-speaking population for an audience. Since we have no Pompeian literature, scholars have usually assumed that Pompeii was a Roman (resort) city and that, for instance, the innumerable paintings in the city (often on Greek subjects) were not created by local Greeks and were copies of works in Hellas. They even forgot the nearby Oracle of KymE [Cumae in Latin] and the comic Atellan Plays in the same Campanian region, not to mention the books in Greek by Parmenides and the other Eleatic philosophers.
 
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That is an extraordinary discovery because it implies that, if plays were performed in Greek, there must have been a Greek-speaking population for an audience. Since we have no Pompeian literature, scholars have usually assumed that Pompeii was a Roman (resort) city and that, for instance, the innumerable paintings in the city (often on Greek subjects) were not created by local Greeks and were copies of works in Hellas. They even forgot the nearby Oracle of KymE [Cumae in Latin] and the comic Atellan Plays in the same Campanian region, not to mention the books in Greek by Parmenides and the other Eleatic philosophers.
Thanks for the additional context
 

amygdalE

Member
That is an extraordinary discovery because it implies that, if plays were performed in Greek, there must have been a Greek-speaking population for an audience. Since we have no Pompeian literature, scholars have usually assumed that Pompeii was a Roman (resort) city and that, for instance, the innumerable paintings in the city (often on Greek subjects) were not created by local Greeks and were copies of works in Hellas. They even forgot the nearby Oracle of KymE [Cumae in Latin] and the comic Atellan Plays in the same Campanian region, not to mention the books in Greek by Parmenides and the other Eleatic philosophers.
Not a Reply but an Addition to the things scholars have constantly forgotten: Pompeiians had books written in Greek. This is not hearsay, because, through delicate modern techniques, Italians have reconstructed a book (by Epicurus, 3rd century B.C.) by analyzing the charred pages due to the volcanic eruption of 79 A.D. Most of the works written by this hedonistic philosopher from Samos have been lost who advocated Ataraxia [tranquillity; ...] as the good of life.
 
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efhernandez_

Active member
Not a Reply but an Addition to the things scholars have constantly forgotten: Pompeiians had books written in Greek. This is not hearsay, because, through delicate modern techniques, Italians have reconstructed a book (by Epicurus, 3rd century B.C.) by analyzing the charred pages due to the volcanic eruption of 79 A.D. Most of the works written by this hedonistic philosopher from Samos have been lost who advocated Ataraxia [tranquillity; ...] as the good of life.
So cool to see how we were all connected back then without technology, thanks for sharing
 
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What is the best topic for a history paper about Greece?

One of my friends is taking a modern Greek history course, and he's struggling to find a topic for hispaper. I told him about this forum, and I'm thinking that some of you history buffs would have good ideas. The paper is supposed to pinpoint a pivotal moment/change in Greek history and discuss how the leadership and government influenced this change. Any ideas?

Theodoros Kolokotronis was the leader of Greek independence

I remember learning about Kolokotronis in Greek school. He was one of the most pivotal figures in the Greek independence movement. He was a general, politician, and a leading advisor to the Greek independence movement. If anyone has any documentaries about him, please share I would love to watch them

Theodoros-Kolokotronis-720x971.jpg

Insightful interview with Mikis Theodorakis (RIP)

It is so cool to see Theodorakis talk like this, very sad that he is gone

Oedipus Rex by Sophocles is my favorite Ancient Greek play

This classic tragedy is still read and performed today. In the play, a father leaves his own son, Oedipus, to die in a field. Rather than die, he is taken in by another family and raised. While with this family, Oedipus is told by an Oracle that he will murder his father and sleep with his mother. Despite his best efforts to prevent this from happening, he does both of these things.

Did you know that the anchor was invented in Ancient Greece?

Prior to the Ancient Greeks, ancient ships would often throw large stones that were tied with ropes over the side of the boats to keep them steady. Even though this did work up to a point, it didn’t work all that well. No matter how heavy the stone was, it would still drift slightly in the ocean. The Ancient Greeks solved this problem by created the first real anchors, which they often referred to as “teeth”, or ὀδὁντες in the original Greek. These first anchors were made from buckets that were filled with stones. These buckets would grab onto the dirt at the ocean floor, thus keeping the ship in plate. Because each ship had several of these anchors, it made the ship even steadier. Even when there was a place to tie the boat to, the anchors were still used to provide extra stability.
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