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blopez34

Active member
The Hecatoncheires or “hundred-handed one” in Greek, are a group of four mythological giants in Ancient Greek mythology. Sometimes they're also called Centimanes. Aegeon is really related to them because his connection with the sea has been drawn by numerous scholars contemporary of Ancient Greece, including Homer. Virgil and Ovid describe Aegeon being not an ally of Zeus, but rather a traitor of his brother and an enemy of the gods, who fought alongside Cronus in the Titanomachy.


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I had no idea, this story is a little niche for my level of Greek mythology knowledge LOL
 
I had no idea, this story is a little niche for my level of Greek mythology knowledge LOL
It's amazing how many characters and creatures there are in Greek Mythology. It's fascinating to learn about, but it can be hard keeping everyone straight.

Thank you, blopez34, for sharing about them!
 

Was the Trojan War real?

I have been wondering, was the Trojan War real? I decided to explore the topic. I still don't know. What do you guys think?

Let's start with the basics. According to ancient Greek mythology, the Trojan War was fought between the Greeks and the Trojans over Helen of Troy. Helen, the wife of King Menelaus, was said to be the most beautiful woman in the world. When she was kidnapped by Paris of Troy, her husband called upon the Greek army to help him get her back. The war lasted ten years, according to the myth, and ended with the Greeks claiming victory when they used a wooden horse to get inside the walls of Troy.

It's easy to dismiss this story as nothing more than a legend, but there is some archaeological evidence that suggests that there may be some truth to the tale. In the 1870s, a German businessman named Heinrich Schliemann claimed to have found the site of ancient Troy in modern-day Turkey. He found evidence of a walled city with multiple layers of ruins, which might have been the result of multiple attacks over time. Whether or not this was the site of the Trojan War is still up for debate, but it's clear that Schliemann believed that he had discovered the home of king Priam and the legendary Trojan horse.

That said, not everyone agrees with Schliemann's findings. In fact, some scholars argue that the city he found wasn't actually Troy at all, but another nearby city with a similar name. Others point out that the ruins he found don't quite match up with the descriptions of the city in the Iliad. Additionally, there is evidence that suggests that the Trojan War didn't happen exactly as it was told in the myth. For example, it's possible that the conflict arose over economic disputes rather than the kidnapping of Helen.

Despite the disagreements among scholars, one thing is for sure: The Trojan War has had a lasting impact on culture and has become one of the most well-known stories from Greek mythology. It has been retold in countless books, movies, and TV shows over the years, and the characters from the story continue to inspire us today. The Trojan hero Hector, for example, has become synonymous with bravery, while Odysseus's journey home has been the inspiration for many other epic tales.

Mythological Roots of the Olympic Games

I've recently found myself deeply fascinated with how ancient myths and legends have influenced modern traditions and events, particularly those with a global following. Among these, the Olympic Games stand out as a prime example of ancient traditions influencing contemporary world culture. I'm eager to learn more about the mythological roots of the Olympic Games and thought this would be the perfect community to turn to for insights.

From what I understand, the origins of the Olympics are deeply intertwined with Greek mythology. The games were held in Olympia, a sanctuary site for Greek gods, and featured various competitions and rituals dedicated to Zeus, the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion. However, my knowledge of how these mythological aspects directly influenced the establishment and evolution of the Olympic Games feels quite superficial.

Sad and Interesting Story of Prometheus

I find the story of Prometheseus to be sad and interesting and I wanted to share. Yes, I like to study Greek mythology - I find it so fascinating!

Prometheus, a Titan in Greek mythology, occupies a unique space in the pantheon of myths due to his intelligence and his profound impact on human civilization. His tale is one marked by valor, insubordination, and enduring punishment, a narrative that has fascinated scholars and enthusiasts for ages.

Prometheus, whose name aptly means "forethought", was known for his wisdom and for being a champion of mankind. Unwilling to see humans suffer, he committed a daring act of defiance against Zeus, the king of the gods, which would forever alter the course of human history.

The most famous aspect of Prometheus’ story involves him stealing fire from the gods and gifting it to humanity. Fire, in Greek mythology, represents more than just a means to warm food or fend off the darkness; it symbolizes knowledge, technology, and enlightenment—tools that would empower humanity to shape their world, for better or worse.

Zeus, infuriated by Prometheus' transgression, sentenced him to a severe and enduring punishment. Prometheus was bound to a rock, where each day an eagle, the emblem of Zeus, was sent to eat his liver, which would then regrow overnight, only for the torment to repeat ad infinitum. It was an eternal punishment for a being who, in many accounts, acted out of compassion and foresight.

I find it sad that he did something so beneficial to humanity but then got punished for it.

Different Gods and Goddesses in Different Parts of Greece?

I had thought that the pantheon of gods and goddesses was a standardized concept throughout Greece, but it appears as if that might be incorrect thinking on my part.

In learning about the different Greek islands and regions of Greece, I see that there might be regional myths, gods, and goddesses that might not be present in other parts of Greece.

I can't think of specific examples. I am just writing this post to confirm to you guys whether this is true or not... For example, I get the feeling that some of the stories on Crete may not have been part of the stories in other places in Greece - like the Minotaur - was that Crete specific?

Maybe there's no way to really know....?

About My Favorite Greek Goddess Aphrodite

I have been researching Aphrodite, one of my favorite goddesses. I put this together based on my research.

Aphrodite was the goddess of love, beauty, and sexuality. She was regarded as the most beautiful and desired goddess in all of Greek mythology. (I think that might be why she fascinates me!)

Aphrodite's origin story is interesting. It's said that she was born from the sea foam created when the Titan Cronus cut off the genitals of his father Ouranos. She was the goddess of love, beauty, and sexuality, with her appearance at times described as pure beauty itself. She is often depicted with a flowing garment that barely covers her curves, and barefooted standing on a pedestal, highlighting her goddess-like beauty.

According to Greek legends, Aphrodite fell in love with many gods, mortals, and even animals, which often resulted in chaotic and tragic events. It is said that she helped cause the Trojan War by causing the love triangle between Paris, the Prince of Troy, and Helen, who was the wife of the Menelaus of Sparta. The story proved her power's influence and the chaos that follows her love.

Aphrodite was also a patron of love and marriage, and apparently married to the god Hephaestus, who fell in love with her beauty alongside all the Greek gods. This marriage was a politically motivated decision of Hera, whose husband Zeus had numerous affairs and that caused constant jealousy between their married life. Needless to say, Aphrodite was having none of it, with her notable lovers being Ares, Adonis, and Anchises.

Aphrodite's influence can be seen even today with countless works of art inspired by her beauty. That is why I love lear about her. She seemed to embody the feminine spirit.

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