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francescool

Active member
Chronos who is the Greek god of time actually had children! And many as many Greek gods and goddesses do, he had many! He had six children who are known as the Olympians. Their names are Chiron, Zeus, Hera, Posiden, Hades, Hestia and Demeter. They are perhaps some of the most important figures in Greek mythology, which is why it shocks me that so few people know that they are all Chronos' children. Not surprisingling, there was a lot of drama and incest that occurred between these siblings. Let me know if you'd like for me to post more about them!
 

k_tsoukalas

Administrator
I totally forgot that Chiron was one of the Chronos children. I would love to hear more information about him!
 

amygdalE

Active member
Chronos who is the Greek god of time actually had children! And many as many Greek gods and goddesses do, he had many! He had six children who are known as the Olympians. Their names are Chiron, Zeus, Hera, Posiden, Hades, Hestia and Demeter. They are perhaps some of the most important figures in Greek mythology, which is why it shocks me that so few people know that they are all Chronos' children. Not surprisingling, there was a lot of drama and incest that occurred between these siblings. Let me know if you'd like for me to post more about them!
Please do post more and, if available, any information about this myth or theogony: Author or Greek tribe, location, historical period. It's strange that the children were called Olympians while Demeter is the grain-vegetation goddess and Hades is the king of the Underworld. Of course, many myths about a given deity are often inconsistent. E.g., Kore was generated by Zeus and Demeter, while vegetation generation is non-sexual.
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
Chronos is one of the words we use for "time" when speaking Greek.

Δεν έχω χρόνο (den exw hrono) = i don't have time
 

amygdalE

Active member
Chronos is one of the words we use for "time" when speaking Greek.

Δεν έχω χρόνο (den exw hrono) = i don't have time
You're right and indeed other languages use "chron-" for "time" in the general sense of the word, as in "chronology" [time-line], but the above post spoke of the myth of personified Time as having children -- whom I found to be logically inconsistent. At the same time, I am not sure of the sense of "having children" when speaking of personified things. For example, in the Latin expression, "Veritas filia temporis" [Truth is the daughter of time], having that daughter means that the truth [the opposite of a lie] will come out sooner or later [will come out in the course of time]. Could it be that the ancient Greek myth-maker meant that the aforementioned six gods were born in time [successively?] on Mount Olympus? In that case, Zeus, Hades, and Poseidon were thought of dwelling on Olympus before they resolved the issue of their governance the universe (which we know from other myths), and before Zeus and Demeter were in charge of the earth [Chthon/KhthoniE], wherefore they were thought as the parents of KorE.
 
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ndatta

New member
I was under the impression that Chronos and Cronos were two different immortal beings. Chronos was the god of time, while Cronos was the King Titan. And Cronos' godly domain was the harvest. That was the one who fathered the elder Olympians. But maybe I am wrong
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
I was under the impression that Chronos and Cronos were two different immortal beings. Chronos was the god of time, while Cronos was the King Titan. And Cronos' godly domain was the harvest. That was the one who fathered the elder Olympians. But maybe I am wrong
That's because they are. They are spelled differently and pronounced differently too.

Chronos is spelled Χρόνος in Greek.. In English, the Greek letter Χχ (chi) is denoted by using "ch" in English, and it is pronounced like an "H" from the back of your throat- it's pronounced more like hronos.

Kronos is spelled Κρόνος in Greek, and Κκ (kappa) is denoted by using a "K" in English, not ch or c because a "ch" represents chi and there is no "C" in Greek. It is pronounced the same way we pronounced a "K" in English.
 

Greek God of Fire Relationship

I have a question for all you mythology aficionados...

The Greek God of Fire, Hephaestus, is not really talked about in Greek mythology.

I didn't know until recently that he was the husband of Aphrodite!? She seems to overpower him in the "relationship".

Is there any information about their relationship out there? I can't find anything...

Favorite Stories of Greek Mythology

I am studying up on some Greek Mythology. I am making a list of key stories to look into and get to know. Can you think of anything I may have missed:

- Prometheus gives mankind fire
- Anything related to the Minotaur
- I plan to read the Iliad and the Odyssey
- How medusa turned into a monster
- Zeus's various "Exploits"
- Anything related to Hercules
- Information about the Olympian gods and goddesses
- The war with the Titans

Aphrodite - Greek Goddess of Love

Ahead of Valentine's Day, I thought I'd share some things that I thought were interesting about Aphrodite, the Greek Goddess of love:

1. Aphrodite Was Born from Sea Foam.
In Greek mythology, it's said that Aphrodite was born from the sea foam that formed when Cronus cut off Uranus's genitals and threw them into the ocean. As the spirit of desire and physical attraction, Aphrodite's birth story reflects the power of nature and the irresistible force of passion.

2. She Was Married to Hephaestus.
Despite her reputation as the goddess of love and beauty, Aphrodite had a less-than-romantic marriage with Hephaestus, the god of blacksmiths and volcanoes. Hephaestus was unattractive and had a limp, and Aphrodite had several affairs with other gods and mortals. To me, this seem like an unlikely match.

3. She Possessed a Magic Girdle.
To make herself even more desirable and seductive, Aphrodite had a magic girdle that could make anyone fall in love with her. It's said that she used this girdle to win the hearts of both gods and mortals and cause conflicts and jealousy among them.

4. She Had Children with Several Gods and Mortals.
Aphrodite was famous for her many love affairs, and she had children with several gods and mortals. Her most famous son was Eros, the god of love and passion, who was sometimes depicted as her lover as well.

5. She Was Worshiped throughout Ancient Greece.
As the goddess of love and beauty, Aphrodite was a popular deity throughout ancient Greece and was worshiped in many cities and temples. She was also associated with fertility, sexuality, and even war, as seen in her role as a protector of soldiers and sailor.

6. Her Symbols Included Doves, Roses, and Mirrors.
Like most deities, Aphrodite had several symbols that represented her qualities and powers. Her most common symbols were doves, roses, and mirrors, which reflected her beauty, love, and vanity.

About My Favorite Greek Goddess Aphrodite

I have been researching Aphrodite, one of my favorite goddesses. I put this together based on my research.

Aphrodite was the goddess of love, beauty, and sexuality. She was regarded as the most beautiful and desired goddess in all of Greek mythology. (I think that might be why she fascinates me!)

Aphrodite's origin story is interesting. It's said that she was born from the sea foam created when the Titan Cronus cut off the genitals of his father Ouranos. She was the goddess of love, beauty, and sexuality, with her appearance at times described as pure beauty itself. She is often depicted with a flowing garment that barely covers her curves, and barefooted standing on a pedestal, highlighting her goddess-like beauty.

According to Greek legends, Aphrodite fell in love with many gods, mortals, and even animals, which often resulted in chaotic and tragic events. It is said that she helped cause the Trojan War by causing the love triangle between Paris, the Prince of Troy, and Helen, who was the wife of the Menelaus of Sparta. The story proved her power's influence and the chaos that follows her love.

Aphrodite was also a patron of love and marriage, and apparently married to the god Hephaestus, who fell in love with her beauty alongside all the Greek gods. This marriage was a politically motivated decision of Hera, whose husband Zeus had numerous affairs and that caused constant jealousy between their married life. Needless to say, Aphrodite was having none of it, with her notable lovers being Ares, Adonis, and Anchises.

Aphrodite's influence can be seen even today with countless works of art inspired by her beauty. That is why I love lear about her. She seemed to embody the feminine spirit.

goddess-aphrodite.jpg
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