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nadellii

Active member
Registries are not a common phenomenon in Greece, and I’m not too sure why. Ever since I’ve been going to weddings, people wil just for envelopes of cash or checks. This is super normal in Greek culture and is considered much easier than either but gifts that people don’t need or setting up an entire registry. On top of that, many older Greek people are not super tech savvy and it would be difficult for them to navigate an online registry. Just something to know when attending any Greek weddings!
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
You put your bank info at the bottom of your invitation and people either deposit money there, or as you said, they give you an envelope with money in it - usually €100
 
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nm1999

Active member
You put your bank info at the bottom of your invitation and people either deposit money there, or as you said, they give you an envelope with money in it - usually €100
Agreed, depending on if you're going to be attending the reception or not, the amount of money you will pay may vary. Of course, depending on how close you are to the couple and how much you are able to afford yourself will play a big role.
 

k_tsoukalas

Moderator
It is interesting how different the cultures are! I didn't realize people would give their bank account info and then wedding guests would deposit money. That's pretty cool, though!
 

Greek Table Etiquette?

I haven't really thought of this, but there is a lot of etiquette for dining in the Greek culture. What do you guys think? It looks like there is a lot to think about:


In particular, the section on doing toasts was fascinating. I noticed that just about at every meal, someone is doing a toast. Do you guys have anything to add?

Tips for Learning Greek While in Greece?

Now that I am getting older, I realize how important my Greek heritage is. So, I've made it my mission to learn more about it. One of the things I want to do is get better at Greek. And sure, I know I can use language programs - but it seems to me that learning it while in the country might be a little easier. I know that a 2 or 3 week trip won't make me fluent, but I bet it can give me a really good head start. Do you guys have any tips for how I can immerse myself in the Greek language while I am in the country?

Translating a few lines from English to Greek

Can anyone possibly help me translate a few lines into Greek? I used to be able to read and write Greek when I was a child, but these days I can barely read at all.

I have a few lines of Greek dialogue in a book I'm writing, and even though Google Translate does a reasonable job of translating English to Greek, from what I can make out, the translation doesn't look correct in the way a normal Greek would casually say the words - the translation just looks a little too formal. Could someone possibly take a look for me - it would only take a few minutes to read through the 3 - 4 lines?

Thanks

Finding a Wedding Planner in Greece?

I decided to do a destination wedding in Greece. I mentioned in an earlier thread that I am not an Orthodox Christian but have decided on the Athens area because I think there are some great photo opportunities all over the city and it is a bit more accessible. Anyway, I know I need help getting everything organized. How does one go about finding a wedding planner in Greece who can help?

Resources for Learning Greek Before Your Trip to Greece

It really does enhance your experience to learn some Greek, or brush up on your existing Greek, before you visit. I thought I would put together a list of some of the best resources I have found - they're all free.

- Duolingo has Greek now - I am not sure how effective it is, but it is free and that alone makes it worth checking out.
- Easy Greek on Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/c/EasyGreekVideos - they have a lot of great content - I love how they interview people on the street
- Podcasts - There are plenty of learn Greek podcasts on both Spotify and through Apple and they are all worth checking out - For example, Easy Greek also has a podcast and there's a good one called "It's All Greek to Me". There are a lot of others.

In addition, you can check out various language programs (these aren't free). I like Pimsleur for conversational Greek, Rosetta Stone is pretty good, Mango, and there are others but those are the ones I have tried.

Which language programs have you used for Greek, and what were your results?
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

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