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nm1999

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This is a very sweet custom, that is not very common in other areas of the world. In Greek culture, as a promise to the bride, the groom buys the brides shoes. In many cases, the bride will choose the shoes and allow for the husband to get them for her as a gift as many brides do not want surprise shoes on the day of her wedding. Did anyone have this tradition of their wedding? I am wondering how common it is these days.
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
My SO was born and raised in Greece, I was born and mostly raised in the USA. Our wedding is this summer and we won't be doing that because it's not the tradition in either of our family's villages.
 
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francescool

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My SO was born and raised in Greece, I was born and mostly raised in the USA. Our wedding is this summer and we won't be doing that because it's not the tradition in either of our family's villages.
What traditions will you be doing, if you don't mind me asking
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
What traditions will you be doing, if you don't mind me asking
Hmm. Off the top of my head, we will put money and a baby in a bed before the wedding, there won't be any bridesmaids or groomsmen (we will only have 2 koumparoi - 1 koumparos and 1 koumpari). Because the wedding is in Greece, I will wait outside of the church for her and everyone will stand outside with me. Her dad will drop her off in a car then she'll walk up to me, and we'll walk into the church together with everyone following behind. There will also be no flower girl or ring bearer.. we have paranifakia (young girls who walk with the bride) who will walk with my SO and hold the train of her dress, and paragamproi (young boys who walk with the groom) whole will follow behind me.
Also, the wedding will start late in the afternoon (after 5pm).

At the reception the first song to be played will be miroloi (a lament) - it's our version of a moment of silence and it is always done as the first song of wedding receptions. Additionally, we will have a band and you can request songs to be played for you or someone else - when you request a song played for you or someone else, you usually give the band money as a tip. Also, it's tradition to shower the band with money by throwing up a lot of bills around the band, so that's going to happen too.
 
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efhernandez_

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Hmm. Off the top of my head, we will put money and a baby in a bed before the wedding, there won't be any bridesmaids or groomsmen (we will only have 2 koumparoi - 1 koumparos and 1 koumpari). Because the wedding is in Greece, I will wait outside of the church for her and everyone will stand outside with me. Her dad will drop her off in a car then she'll walk up to me, and we'll walk into the church together with everyone following behind. There will also be no flower girl or ring bearer.. we have paranifakia (young girls who walk with the bride) who will walk with my SO and hold the train of her dress, and paragamproi (young boys who walk with the groom) whole will follow behind me.
Also, the wedding will start late in the afternoon (after 5pm).

At the reception the first song to be played will be miroloi (a lament) - it's our version of a moment of silence and it is always done as the first song of wedding receptions. Additionally, we will have a band and you can request songs to be played for you or someone else - when you request a song played for you or someone else, you usually give the band money as a tip. Also, it's tradition to shower the band with money by throwing up a lot of bills around the band, so that's going to happen too.
I had no idea that they play a miroloi at the beginning of the wedding reception. Is it a way of honoring passed family members? This sounds like a beautiful tradition. I have seen people honor passed loved ones in many different ways at their weddings depending on the culture that they are from.
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
I had no idea that they play a miroloi at the beginning of the wedding reception. Is it a way of honoring passed family members? This sounds like a beautiful tradition. I have seen people honor passed loved ones in many different ways at their weddings depending on the culture that they are from.
Yes, but I'm not sure how widespread it is throughout Greece, but unlike America during out moment of silence, people get more emotional in our villages - they will start crying.
 
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francescool

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Yes, but I'm not sure how widespread it is throughout Greece, but unlike America during out moment of silence, people get more emotional in our villages - they will start crying.
I can imagine how emotional this is, especially at a wedding. I also find that Greek people are more comfortable showing their emotions and they are more passionate. Thank you for sharing.
 

What does malakas really mean?

As many of you may know, malakas is probably one of the most popular words and swearwords in the Greek language. I hear it all the time when I'm travelling in Greece, and even when I'm in the United States. People can't seem to get enough of it. And its original state, the word means "wanker" which is commonly used in the UK. Although, the word has taken on many forms and can mean pretty much anything from "you're my best friend" to "I hate you."

This Greek Evzone was made in the USA!

This makes me so proud and happy to see that people are connecting with their heritage from miles away and willingly doing the military service to serve their country. Bravo to the soldier and those that are like him. I can't wait to go to Athens again and visit the tomb of the unknown soldier.

Did you know about the Greek New Years tradition of hanging onions on doors?

In Greece, there are many different New Year's traditions and some of them vary by location and the specific culture of the region. Most of them bring good luck and health for the new year, especially this onion tradition. Across all of Greece, families will hang a yellow onion on their door as a symbol of good luck. They will usually do this after the church service on New Year's Day. While not all families do this, you may see it next time you visit Greece in January, look out for it!

A beautiful Cretan wedding

Cretan wedding traditions are probably the most elaborate out of all the regions in Greece. It's one of the only cultures that still holds onto their wedding traditions so strongly. I personally can't wait to go to a Cretan wedding and experience all of this in person. If you are from Crete, please let me know if you had some of the traditions at your wedding!

What is the process of having a political wedding in Greece?

I'm not sure if I'm going to be having a wedding in a church, so I am wondering what the process is of having a political or non-religious wedding in Greece. I know that the reception will be a classic reception, but is there someone who can officiate a wedding regardless of religion? And is this done for people who don't live in Greece?
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

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