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paharo45

Active member
Dido is lesser known but she is a super important figure in Greek mythology. She is the Queen of Ancient Carthage and she is said to have died for love. She is also known as Elissa or Alyssa and was the founder and first queen of Carthage. Carthage was a Phoenician city-state located in what is now Tunisia. The name Dido may come from the same root as David, which means “beloved.” Another theory is that the name Dido means “the wanderer.”

dido.jpg
 
I've never heard of her but she sounds super cool! What was her role as queen??
 

Mythological Roots of the Olympic Games

I've recently found myself deeply fascinated with how ancient myths and legends have influenced modern traditions and events, particularly those with a global following. Among these, the Olympic Games stand out as a prime example of ancient traditions influencing contemporary world culture. I'm eager to learn more about the mythological roots of the Olympic Games and thought this would be the perfect community to turn to for insights.

From what I understand, the origins of the Olympics are deeply intertwined with Greek mythology. The games were held in Olympia, a sanctuary site for Greek gods, and featured various competitions and rituals dedicated to Zeus, the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion. However, my knowledge of how these mythological aspects directly influenced the establishment and evolution of the Olympic Games feels quite superficial.

Accurate movies about Greek mythology?

I am looking for some "accurate" movies that have Greek mythological topics. I say "accurate" because how can we really even know? Many of the stories were handed down through the generations, and some even may have been lost. I guess I mean accurate according to what has been established from works that have survived.

I found this video - has anyone watched these?

Hestia Greek Goddess Information

We don't talk about Hestia much... but I just remembered that my yiayia did! I wondered why, so I researched her. Here is what I found... I think it has something to do with the fact that she was a housewife and she loved her family.. Looking at what she represents, it kind of makes sense. Here's what I found about her:

The Greek goddess Hestia was revered as the goddess of the hearth and home. In ancient Greek mythology, she was known to be a benevolent deity, who brought warmth and comfort to the home. Through her presence, she blessed the family and provided them with a sense of safety and security.

Hestia was the first-born child of Cronus and Rhea, and she was the sister of other Olympian gods such as Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades. Unlike her brothers and sisters, she did not engage in any power struggles or battles. She preferred to remain neutral and instead focused her attention on her household duties. Hestia was considered one of the most important deities, as the hearth represented the heart of the home. People would light a fire in her honor and worship her by placing offerings of food and drink on their hearth.

In ancient Greek culture, a hearth was often considered the most important part of the home. It was where food was cooked, and family members gathered to eat, share stories, and bond. Hestia's role in domestic life was crucial, and she was responsible for creating the warmth and sense of security felt within the home. Her presence was believed to bring good luck and happiness to the family.

Thesmorphia - Ancient Greek Thanksgiving Festival

I have heard this festival described as an "Ancient Greek Thanksgiving" so I thought I would look it up. Very interesting! I don't see the "Thanksgiving" connection (not the way we in the US think of it) but I thought it was interesting because it goes to show you that gratitude-related festivals are an ancient concept. And it is a harvest festival, just like our US Thanksgiving is...

Some information I have gathered:

The Thesmorphia festival was celebrated on the 11th of Pyanepsion, which corresponds to late October or early November in the modern Gregorian calendar. The festival was a three-day affair, and it was observed mainly by women. During the festival, women were not allowed to sleep with their husbands, and purification rituals were performed at the temples of Demeter and Persephone. On the first day, the first fruits of the harvest were offered to Demeter, and a feast was held in her honor. On the second day, a procession was held, and women walked around the fields carrying torches, symbolizing the power of Demeter. The third day was a joyous celebration, and the remnants of the feast were donated to the poor.

The Thesmorphia festival was significant for many reasons. Firstly, it celebrated the end of the harvesting season, and it was a time to give thanks for a good crop. The festival was also a time for women to come together, and it was an opportunity for them to assert their power and influence in the society. Women played a significant role in the festival, and they were responsible for the preparation of the feast and various other aspects of the festival.

The festival was also significant in terms of its religious and mythological significance. Demeter was the goddess of agriculture, and Persephone was her young daughter, who was kidnapped by Hades, the god of the underworld. The story of Persephone reflects the cycle of life, death, and resurrection. The festival of Thesmorphia was an opportunity to honor these two goddesses and their mythology, which highlighted the importance of the harvest and the cycle of life.

Another reason why the Thesmorphia festival was significant was that it was a time for the community to come together and celebrate. The feast was an opportunity to share food, drink, and stories and build camaraderie amongst members of the community. During the festival, people forgot their differences and came together to celebrate the bounty of the harvest.

Learning About Dionysius

I have recently been studying about Dionysius. I feel like I hav been forgetting about him! Beyond the basics that he is the Greek god of wine, festivity, and ecstatic celebration, I’m eager to peel back the layers and understand his role and significance across different cultures and historical epochs.

What piqued my interest initially was how Dionysius seems to embody a dual nature – both bringing joy and chaos. This duality, along with his followers, rituals, and the influence on arts and culture, presents a fascinating study. I am particularly interested in the Dionysian festivals!

Curious to hear people's thoughts...
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