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xmelissaa

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I love to research Greek mythology. Because it is Valentine's Day, the day of love, I thought I would research Eros, which, from what I understand, is the Greek God of love (and kind of similar in concept to the Roman cupid).

Here's some info I found from the Eros wikipedia entry:

Eros appears in ancient Greek sources under several different guises. In the earliest sources, he is one of the primordial gods involved in the coming into being of the cosmos. In later sources, however, Eros is represented as the son of Aphrodite, whose mischievous interventions in the affairs of gods and mortals cause bonds of love to form, often illicitly. Ultimately, in the later satirical poets, he is represented as a blindfolded child, the precursor to the chubby Renaissance Cupid, whereas in early Greek poetry and art, Eros was depicted as a young adult male who embodies sexual power, and a profound artist.

Interesting!
 
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I love to research Greek mythology. Because it is Valentine's Day, the day of love, I thought I would research Eros, which, from what I understand, is the Greek God of love (and kind of similar in concept to the Roman cupid).

Here's some info I found from the Eros wikipedia entry:

Eros appears in ancient Greek sources under several different guises. In the earliest sources, he is one of the primordial gods involved in the coming into being of the cosmos. In later sources, however, Eros is represented as the son of Aphrodite, whose mischievous interventions in the affairs of gods and mortals cause bonds of love to form, often illicitly. Ultimately, in the later satirical poets, he is represented as a blindfolded child, the precursor to the chubby Renaissance Cupid, whereas in early Greek poetry and art, Eros was depicted as a young adult male who embodies sexual power, and a profound artist.

Interesting!
Going from the Age of Myths to the Age of Reason: Plato sees that eros is a man's DESIRE for the other half -- obviously referring to the ancient myth that "Anthropos" [grammatically either masculine of feminine -- ho/hE -- in classical Greek] was split into two parts. Sorry, this myth has to be researched. Which god was involved in this?
a find: https://allthatsinteresting.com/plato-symposium
 
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Going from the Age of Myths to the Age of Reason: Plato sees that eros is a man's DESIRE for the other half -- obviously referring to the ancient myth that "Anthropos" [grammatically either masculine of feminine -- ho/hE -- in classical Greek] was split into two parts. Sorry, this myth has to be researched. Which god was involved in this?
a find: https://allthatsinteresting.com/plato-symposium
The link doesn't work!

Plato discussed eros as a philosophical concept. The Eros (God) of mythology isn't the same as Plato's eros (a concept). Eros (God) is a child of Aphrodite and Ares.
 
The link doesn't work!

Plato discussed eros as a philosophical concept. The Eros (God) of mythology isn't the same as Plato's eros (a concept). Eros (God) is a child of Aphrodite and Ares.
Well, yes and no.... IF a male seeks his other half, eros is a driving force. This is the inevitable concept of it, which has been called also LOVE. I am reminded of the words in La Traviata: ...di quell'AMOR ch'e` palpito dell'universo intero: ...of that LOVE which is the palpitation [pulsation] of the entire universe. // Indeed, in one myth, Eros is the son of A. and A. , but who are they? She is the personification of beauty [that which is loved]; Ares is the powerful lover. // Other myths....
 
Well, yes and no.... IF a male seeks his other half, eros is a driving force. This is the inevitable concept of it, which has been called also LOVE. I am reminded of the words in La Traviata: ...di quell'AMOR ch'e` palpito dell'universo intero: ...of that LOVE which is the palpitation [pulsation] of the entire universe. // Indeed, in one myth, Eros is the son of A. and A. , but who are they? She is the personification of beauty [that which is loved]; Ares is the powerful lover. // Other myths....
To add: Even though Plato was not a physicist, in his Symposium he dealt with human love in the context of Love/Eros as the cosmic principle of attraction, which was recognized by the elementarists [Empedocles etc.].
 
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xmelissa, it's not just you; it's a very old tradition to SPEAK in this manner: the god OF love, the father OF the Olympians, etc. Thus it seems that love and the god are distinct. No, EROS = love, but as personified, it is called a god. As a drive, Socrates called it a Daimon. Chronos = time/Time. Philosophers are still struggling to define time.......
 

Greek God or Goddess About Cooking?

I've recently been diving into mythology and am particularly fascinated by Greek mythology. I was wondering, are there any Greek gods or goddesses associated with cooking or cuisine?

I know the Greeks had gods and goddesses for various aspects of life, and I'm curious if the culinary arts were represented in any way. Thanks in advance!

Learning About Dionysius

I have recently been studying about Dionysius. I feel like I hav been forgetting about him! Beyond the basics that he is the Greek god of wine, festivity, and ecstatic celebration, I’m eager to peel back the layers and understand his role and significance across different cultures and historical epochs.

What piqued my interest initially was how Dionysius seems to embody a dual nature – both bringing joy and chaos. This duality, along with his followers, rituals, and the influence on arts and culture, presents a fascinating study. I am particularly interested in the Dionysian festivals!

Curious to hear people's thoughts...

List of fun Greek mythology topics

I really love Greek Mythology. I thought I would share with you all some of my favorite topics:

  1. Birth of the Olympians and how they came to power
  2. Different heroes of Greek mythology
  3. 12 Labors of Hercules
  4. Trojan War
  5. Iliad and the Odyssey and all the stories in them
  6. The story of Persephone
  7. Pandora's box
  8. Different creatures - like the Minotaur and Hydra
What are yours?

Question about the Fates of Greek Mythology

I am helping someone gather information for a school project on Greek Mythology so your input is much appreciated. This is more like, to help the person know enough information to be able to research it.

The project is about the Fates. These mysterious beings, often depicted as three sisters—Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos—were believed to control the destiny of every mortal and god alike. Their thread-spinning, measuring, and cutting symbolized the weaving of each individual's life, from birth to death.

But what exactly was the extent of their power? How did they interact with other gods and mortals? These questions have sparked endless fascination and speculation among scholars and enthusiasts alike.

Were the Fates merely impartial observers, executing predetermined destinies without interference? Or did they possess agency, actively shaping the lives of those they governed? Furthermore, what implications did their existence hold for concepts of free will and determinism in ancient Greek thought?

About Theogony by Hesiod

This poem has been one of my favorites for a while. I think everyone interested in Greek Mythology should read it! I thought I'd give you a summary:

Hesiod begins by invoking the Muses to guide him in recounting the story of the origins of the gods. He describes Chaos as the initial void from which the first gods emerged. From Chaos came Gaia (Earth), Tartarus (the Underworld), and Eros (Love), setting the stage for the creation of the cosmos.

Gaia gives birth to Uranus (the Sky), who becomes her husband and the father of the Titans, Cyclopes, and Hecatoncheires (Hundred-Handed Ones). Uranus, fearing the power of his offspring, imprisons them within Gaia's womb. Gaia urges her children to rebel, and her Titan son Cronus castrates Uranus, seizing power for himself.

Cronus becomes the ruler of the cosmos but fears a prophecy that one of his children will overthrow him. To prevent this, he swallows each of his children upon their birth, except for Zeus, who is saved by his mother Rhea and hidden away. Zeus grows up and defeats Cronus, establishing himself as the king of the gods.

The poem then describes the Titanomachy, the epic battle between Zeus and the Titans, which ends with the Titans' defeat and their imprisonment in Tartarus. Zeus and his siblings, the Olympian gods, become the rulers of the cosmos.

The narrative continues with the story of the Gigantomachy, the battle between the gods and the Giants, and other myths surrounding the gods' interactions with mortals and each other.
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