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nadellii

Active member
I soaked the gigantes beans overnight then changed the water. I then added them to a pot, filled the pot with water with a pinch of sea salt, brought them to a boil, and simmered them for almost two hours. I drained the water then proceeded to make the rest of the dish.

The beans never fully got soft. I have to add that I have no idea how long the beans were in my pantry. I didn't buy them as far as I know, but then again if I did buy them it was so long ago I don't remember.

Could I have just used beans that were far too old or did I genuinely do something wrong?
 
Your beans were too old. After soaking overnight and simmering for two hours they should definitely be perfect!
 
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Beans too old is my thought too. They should be tender.
 
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I always put mi e in a pressure cooker then bake in seasoned tomatoe sauce in the oven
 
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Okay, I think they are too old too. I have some left from that batch and I will try putting them in the pressure cooker. If this doesn't work, I will throw away what is left. Thanks!
 
I vote that the beans were too old, as well. Even if you just bought them, who knows how long they have been sitting around at a warehouse or on the shelf!
 
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Top herbal teas popular in Greece?

Could anyone share insights or recommendations on which herbal teas are the most popular or cherished in Greece? I'm particularly interested in teas that are unique to the region or have a special place in Greek culture and wellness practices.

Also, if you have any suggestions on where I might purchase these teas, especially if they're available online, that would be incredibly helpful! I'm eager to try making some of these teas at home and experiencing a taste of Greek herbal tradition.

Thank you in advance for your help! I’m looking forward to exploring your suggestions and hopefully discovering some new favorite teas.

List of Different Greek Cooking Techniques

I hope you're all doing well! I've recently developed a deep appreciation for Greek cuisine and I'm eager to expand my cooking skills in this area. However, I'm realizing that I might be missing out on some traditional Greek cooking techniques that are essential for authentic dishes.

Could anyone kindly provide me with a list of cooking techniques commonly used in Greek cuisine? Whether it's grilling, baking, braising, or something more specific to Greek cooking, I'm eager to learn! Any insights, tips, or favorite methods would be greatly appreciated. Looking forward to your responses!

Here's what I can think of so far:

  • Frying - usually in olive oil, right? Things like Greek fries and kourabedies come to mind is being fried.
  • Grilling - souvlaki, chicken, etc
  • Sandwiches - gyros, making "toast" that you see on menus in Greece
  • Braising - like braised lamb?
  • On the spot - Lamb, goat
  • Baking - desserts and savory dishes
What have I missed?

Greek Yogurt Pasta Recipe

I thought I would share a recipe for Greek yogurt pasta. I had it in a cafe in Greece once and have been making something similar ever since.

Ingredients

  • 8 oz (225g) pasta of your choice (e.g., penne, spaghetti, fusilli)
  • 1 cup (240g) Greek yogurt (plain, full-fat for creaminess)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 lemon (juice and zest)
  • 1/4 cup (30g) grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup (30g) crumbled feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) olive oil
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) pasta cooking water
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • Fresh parsley or basil leaves for garnish (optional)
  • Cherry tomatoes, halved (optional)
  • Baby spinach leaves (optional)
Instructions

Cook the Pasta
:

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the pasta and cook according to the package instructions until al dente.

Reserve 1/4 cup (60ml) of the pasta cooking water before draining the pasta.

Prepare the Sauce:

In a large mixing bowl, combine the Greek yogurt, minced garlic, lemon juice, and lemon zest. Mix well.

Add the grated Parmesan cheese, crumbled feta cheese, olive oil, dried oregano, and dried basil. Stir until well combined.

Combine Pasta and Sauce:

Add the cooked pasta to the bowl with the sauce. Toss to coat the pasta evenly.

If the sauce is too thick, gradually add the reserved pasta cooking water until you reach your desired consistency.

Season and Garnish:

Taste the pasta and season with salt and black pepper to your liking.

For an extra touch of freshness, toss in some halved cherry tomatoes and baby spinach leaves.

Garnish with fresh parsley or basil leaves, if desired.

Can you use frozen vegetables for Greek dishes?

There are two Greek dishes that I enjoy a lot and like to make a lot - fasolakia and the baked vegetables with the variety.

It's not always realistic for me to make them, though, because of the vegetable situation.

Is it okay to use frozen veggies? These are washed and chopped - they're basically ready to go - so it would save me a lot of time!

fasolakia-greek-food.jpg

Greek Warm Weather Eating

With the warm weather approaching, I've been eager to explore more light and refreshing dishes. I'm particularly interested in Greek cuisine, which I know has a lot of great options perfect for sunny days.

Could anyone share their favorite Greek dishes to enjoy when the weather is warm? I'm looking for suggestions that are both delicious and easy to prepare. Any recipes or tips on where to find authentic ingredients would be greatly appreciated too!
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