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k_tsoukalas

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Lent for Orthodox Christians begins on Monday (March 15th), which got me thinking about Easter. I am curious - what are some of your favorite Easter traditions? For me, going to church on Saturday night and bringing home the candle, breaking our Lenten fast with a nice meal after church (usually pastitso, kouloura, olives, feta cheese, and a red Easter egg), and eating lamb the next day, are some of my favorites.
 
It is such a special time for us.My dad cooked a whole lamb outside. I took it over for many years and now I cook 2 lamb legs. My son-in-law likes his rare.
Of course, I went to church every day.
 
How is Greek easter different from Catholic or western easter?
 
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How is Greek easter different from Catholic or western easter?
As for timing, I know Orthodox Easter has to be after the first full moon after the Jewish Passover. Western Easter simply has to be after the Equinox. Sometimes they're on the same day. However, if you listen to the Greek comedian Basile, he said it's because it enables the Easter Bunny to buy half price candy.
 
Lent for Orthodox Christians begins on Monday (March 15th), which got me thinking about Easter. I am curious - what are some of your favorite Easter traditions? For me, going to church on Saturday night and bringing home the candle, breaking our Lenten fast with a nice meal after church (usually pastitso, kouloura, olives, feta cheese, and a red Easter egg), and eating lamb the next day, are some of my favorites.
Besides participating in extra church services and fasting through lent, Easter Day is quite the celebration in our house. The food always includes pastitsio, lamb, koulouria , a Greek sweet bread in individually baked pieces that was a recipe unique to my mother-n-law's family. I have yet to see a comparable recipe in Greek cook books. For dessert koulourakia are always included. So many traditions. Here are some koulourakia and the sweet bread right out of the oven.
 

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Easter is my favorite Greek holiday and the tradition I like the most is roasting the lamb on the spit!

The process for my family in past years is to purchase the lamb locally (with head of course!) on good Friday. Keep it packed on ice and then marinate it the next morning (good Saturday) get it attached spit (which is a fun process, LOL) then get it ready to go for Easter morning.

Then the best part happens! Family gets together at 7AM Easter morning and then the fire gets started and the slow cooking process takes place until lunch is served at around 1PM. Most people stop by to grab a fresh piece of lamb off the spit. Most times it does not make it to the table :)

Why-Do-We-Roast-Lamb-at-Easter-720x480.jpeg
 
Easter is my favorite Greek holiday and the tradition I like the most is roasting the lamb on the spit!

The process for my family in past years is to purchase the lamb locally (with head of course!) on good Friday. Keep it packed on ice and then marinate it the next morning (good Saturday) get it attached spit (which is a fun process, LOL) then get it ready to go for Easter morning.

Then the best part happens! Family gets together at 7AM Easter morning and then the fire gets started and the slow cooking process takes place until lunch is served at around 1PM. Most people stop by to grab a fresh piece of lamb off the spit. Most times it does not make it to the table :)

View attachment 32
Oh wow! Head and all? When we used to do the
Easter is my favorite Greek holiday and the tradition I like the most is roasting the lamb on the spit!

The process for my family in past years is to purchase the lamb locally (with head of course!) on good Friday. Keep it packed on ice and then marinate it the next morning (good Saturday) get it attached spit (which is a fun process, LOL) then get it ready to go for Easter morning.

Then the best part happens! Family gets together at 7AM Easter morning and then the fire gets started and the slow cooking process takes place until lunch is served at around 1PM. Most people stop by to grab a fresh piece of lamb off the spit. Most times it does not make it to the table :)

View attachment 32
I hear you. Sounds so similar to what we used to do, minus the head. My husband, his dad, and his brothers used to turn the spit by hand until we got a motorized spit. My husband really misses that tradition, but after losing his father, his brother, and his other brother moved away...well, you get the picture. It's tough having to let some traditions go as we age. We've been making new traditions though. Thank God.
 
Lent for Orthodox Christians begins on Monday (March 15th), which got me thinking about Easter. I am curious - what are some of your favorite Easter traditions? For me, going to church on Saturday night and bringing home the candle, breaking our Lenten fast with a nice meal after church (usually pastitso, kouloura, olives, feta cheese, and a red Easter egg), and eating lamb the next day, are some of my favorites.
Easter is the Greek Super Bow land the lamb on the spit is the MVP!

My favorite tradition in my family is gathering the men (women are welcome they just don't want to hang out with us at 7am ha) building the fire and watching the lamb cook while eating mezedakia, listening to music and laughing. We used to manually turn the spit and take turns doing so back in the day but now we have a motorized spit so we just pretend to be working hard. To me it's a great way of gathering multi generations together to spend time together and not on our phones.
 
Easter is the Greek Super Bow land the lamb on the spit is the MVP!

My favorite tradition in my family is gathering the men (women are welcome they just don't want to hang out with us at 7am ha) building the fire and watching the lamb cook while eating mezedakia, listening to music and laughing. We used to manually turn the spit and take turns doing so back in the day but now we have a motorized spit so we just pretend to be working hard. To me it's a great way of gathering multi generations together to spend time together and not on our phones.
Greek superbowl I LOVE that haha
So true at my house! There are always at least 5 men standing around 1 lamb watching it cook haha
 
As for timing, I know Orthodox Easter has to be after the first full moon after the Jewish Passover. Western Easter simply has to be after the Equinox. Sometimes they're on the same day. However, if you listen to the Greek comedian Basile, he said it's because it enables the Easter Bunny to buy half price candy.
Thank you!! That's hilarious lol, I will check him out
 
Easter is my favorite Greek holiday and the tradition I like the most is roasting the lamb on the spit!

The process for my family in past years is to purchase the lamb locally (with head of course!) on good Friday. Keep it packed on ice and then marinate it the next morning (good Saturday) get it attached spit (which is a fun process, LOL) then get it ready to go for Easter morning.

Then the best part happens! Family gets together at 7AM Easter morning and then the fire gets started and the slow cooking process takes place until lunch is served at around 1PM. Most people stop by to grab a fresh piece of lamb off the spit. Most times it does not make it to the table :)

View attachment 32
Mmmmm looks so yummy! Reminds me of what my uncle used to do every summer except he'd add a couple more lambs lol my family is huge
 
My favorite tradition is coming together with my family and making tsoureki. It's so hands on and I love to get the whole family on board (even if we mess up the recipe lol)

tsoureki.JPG
 
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Dying the eggs red and making tsoureki is definitely a family favorite!
 
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List of Cretan Dances?

I will be attending a Cretan wedding and am curious about the traditional Cretan dances! I know the dances are slightly different and I want to learn some. I don't know the names of the dances so that I can look them up. I did some research, though. Are any of these dances common at these weddings?
  • Pentozali
  • Sousta
  • Siganos
  • Chaniotis
There's a dance the wedding party typically does in Crete. Which dance is that?

What is kefi exactly?

I have always found the concept of kefi to be intriguing, and I would like to learn more about it from those familiar or even vaguely aware of this notion. From what little I understand, kefi seems to embody a unique blend of joy, spirit, and passion, deeply ingrained in Greek culture. It's more than just a word; it's a lifestyle, a form of expression, an unbridled enthusiasm for life.

However, I'm curious to know about the deeper nuances and applications of kefi. How does kefi manifest in day-to-day life, not just in Greece, but wherever one might find joy and enthusiasm? Is it something that can be consciously cultivated, or does it spontaneously bloom in moments of happiness and high spirits? It seems like it really permeates the culture, especially in Greece.

Getting a Greek costume made?

I'm looking to have a traditional Greek costume made, and I want to ensure that it is as authentic and high-quality as possible.

It's for festival season but I don't know if I am in over my head. This could be anything from the iconic fustanella worn by men to the beautifully embroidered dresses seen in various regions across Greece. I’m open to suggestions on materials, designs, and specific regional styles that would make for a remarkable and authentic piece.

Could anyone here recommend a tailor or a shop—either within Greece or internationally—that specializes in creating traditional Greek clothing? It’s essential that they pay great attention to detail and use high-quality materials to capture the spirit and beauty of Greek traditional attire.

Additionally, if you have any advice on what specifics I should communicate to the tailor to ensure authenticity, or if you know of any resources where I could find patterns or detailed descriptions of traditional costumes, I would greatly appreciate it.

Greek Easter Holy Week Liturgies!

How to choose godparents?

I'm currently planning a baptism for a child in the Greek Orthodox Church and finding myself at a bit of a crossroads. One of the most significant decisions we're facing is choosing the right godparents. I understand that in our tradition, the role of a godparent is not only a great honor but also carries profound spiritual and moral responsibilities. They are to guide the child in the Orthodox faith, ensuring they grow in the church and its teachings.

How do you choose? I have a few candidates and am trying to narrow it down.
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

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