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d_kakavouli

Active member
I have heard of the tradition of decorating boats in Greece for Christmas. I think it's called karakavi? Does anyone know anything more about it? This isn't a tradition my family adopted but I have heard of friends doing it. I am thinking of adding it to our holiday celebrations this year.

From what I can tell, people who don't have an actual boat decorate models of boats. At first, I thought based on pics I had seen of Greece in the past, that boat owners were just being festive. lol
 
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The word for boat is "karavi" so what you mean to say is "karavaki"

Greeks didn't decorate trees in the last; they decorated boats for St. Nicholas. The ancient Greeks started this tradition. Today, many Greeks don't decorate boats anymore unless they happen to have them. Most just decorate a tree now.

Also, Santa doesn't come on Christmas, he comes on January 1.
 
My family has been in the United States for a while, and many of the old Greek traditions have gotten lost. No one in my family has done this thing with the ships, but it is something that I might want to experiment doing this year!
 

Summer Festivals in Greece?

With the warm weather approaching, I've been eager to explore more light and refreshing dishes. I'm particularly interested in Greek cuisine, which I know has a lot of great options perfect for sunny days.

Could anyone share their favorite Greek dishes to enjoy when the weather is warm? I'm looking for suggestions that are both delicious and easy to prepare. Any recipes or tips on where to find authentic ingredients would be greatly appreciated too!

How to choose godparents?

I'm currently planning a baptism for a child in the Greek Orthodox Church and finding myself at a bit of a crossroads. One of the most significant decisions we're facing is choosing the right godparents. I understand that in our tradition, the role of a godparent is not only a great honor but also carries profound spiritual and moral responsibilities. They are to guide the child in the Orthodox faith, ensuring they grow in the church and its teachings.

How do you choose? I have a few candidates and am trying to narrow it down.

Thinking about the Greek way of hospitality...

I thought I would ask your thoughts oh Philoxenia - or the Greek way, or art, of hospitality. I noticed this when I travel in Greece. People are so kind, they often go out of the way for us, when I feel that they don't have to! How can one describe this to someone?

From what I understand, Philoxenia is not merely a practice but a deeply ingrained value within Greek culture that extends far beyond the simple act of hosting. It reflects a genuine, heartfelt welcome to strangers, treating them with the same respect and generosity one would show to a dearly beloved friend. This beautiful tradition, passed down through generations, turns the act of hosting into an art form, embodying warmth, respect, and a profound sense of human compassion. There have been so many stories I can think of...

This thought process was triggered because we were watching My Big Fat Greek Wedding 3 - someone in the village had taken on a Syrian refugee. Is this a Greek hospitality thing? Philoxenia?

Greek Wedding Traditions Roundup

I am helping someone plan her Greek wedding. I wanted to make a list of all the traditions we need to keep in time for the big day. Did I miss anything?

The Stolisma

The wedding day begins with the ritual of 'Stolisma,' where the bride and groom are prepared separately by their families. It's a moment filled with emotion, songs, and blessings, setting the tone for the day. I had honestly never heard of this. Do people still do it?

The Krevati

An amusing tradition is the 'Krevati' (bed making), where family and friends gather to decorate the couple's future bed with baby items, symbolizing fertility and a happy family life. Money is also often thrown on the bed for good luck and prosperity.

The Crowning (Stefana)

One of the most iconic rituals during the ceremony is the exchange of crowns or 'Stefana.' I believe they need to buy the crowns they want in advance?

Koufeta

No Greek wedding would be complete without 'Koufeta'—sugar-coated almonds given to guests as wedding favors. These bittersweet treats represent the ups and downs of married life and are shared in odd numbers to symbolize indivisibility and shared life.

Navigating Greek Lenten Fasting - Advice?

Lent is here and all my friends and family have been asking "what are you doing for lent this year?" They're all "giving something up" but I decided I wanted to fast. I would love your help and advice because this is the first time I am doing things in a stricter way. I resolve to see it through!

It's supposed to be a a time of reflection, purification, and preparation for the celebration of Easter, and the diet plays a significant part in this spiritual journey. I don't want to get so obsessed with the "rules" that I lose myself in them and forget why I am fasting int he first place.

Thanks in advance!
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

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