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blopez34

Active member
I don't know what this is called but I had it at someone's house and I want to make it. I didn't have a chance to ask the host about the dish and I don't know them well enough to be able to do this easily.

It was in a baking dish. It had a medley of veggies like zucchini, green beans, potatoes, and artichokes (is what I remember)... a thin tomato sauce was involved. I faintly tasted rosemary or some other herb like that.
 
I don't know what this is called but I had it at someone's house and I want to make it. I didn't have a chance to ask the host about the dish and I don't know them well enough to be able to do this easily.

It was in a baking dish. It had a medley of veggies like zucchini, green beans, potatoes, and artichokes (is what I remember)... a thin tomato sauce was involved. I faintly tasted rosemary or some other herb like that.
Greek vegetable casserole is called Briam. It usually consists of zucchini, eggplant, potatoes, tomatoes, parsley, onions, garlic, and a very good amount of greek olive oil. Now with that being said, you can sub different veggies if you would like. We do have a great recipe of Briam in our cookbook “Cooking Greek”. Oh and don’t forget to accompany the dish with a big slab of feta and fresh bread!
 
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Greek vegetable casserole is called Briam. It usually consists of zucchini, eggplant, potatoes, tomatoes, parsley, onions, garlic, and a very good amount of greek olive oil. Now with that being said, you can sub different veggies if you would like. We do have a great recipe of Briam in our cookbook “Cooking Greek”. Oh and don’t forget to accompany the dish with a big slab of feta and fresh bread!
Wow this sounds delicious. I am not sure I would have thought to use parsley! I love parsley...
 
Greek vegetable casserole is called Briam. It usually consists of zucchini, eggplant, potatoes, tomatoes, parsley, onions, garlic, and a very good amount of greek olive oil. Now with that being said, you can sub different veggies if you would like. We do have a great recipe of Briam in our cookbook “Cooking Greek”. Oh and don’t forget to accompany the dish with a big slab of feta and fresh bread!
Yup this is close to what I do! I have a basic recipe in my head, that I think of as more of a method than a recipe, and use vegetables that bake well that are in season. I tend to only really make it in the summer. For example, I sometimes add green beans, potatoes, artichoke hearts, okra, etc to the dish - maybe I'll omit eggplant if I am not in the mood, that kind of thing.
 

Greek Halva Recipe to Enjoy During Lent?

I love Halva year round but I often see it a lot during Lent. My recipe doesn't seem Lent friendly to me. Any ideas on how I can adapt it?

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup semolina
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup chopped almonds or walnuts (optional)
  • 1/4 cup raisins (optional)
Instructions:
  1. In a medium-sized saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat.
  2. Add the semolina to the melted butter and stir continuously for about 5-7 minutes, or until the semolina turns golden brown and begins to emit a nutty aroma.
  3. While stirring the semolina mixture, gradually add the sugar and continue to cook for another 2-3 minutes until the sugar is fully incorporated.
  4. Slowly pour in the water, stirring constantly to avoid lumps from forming. Be careful as the mixture may splatter.
  5. Reduce the heat to low and continue stirring the mixture until it thickens to a porridge-like consistency, about 5-7 minutes.
  6. Stir in the ground cinnamon and optional chopped nuts and raisins, if using.
  7. Remove the saucepan from the heat and let the halva rest for a few minutes to thicken further.
  8. Serve the halva warm or at room temperature, either as a dessert or a sweet breakfast treat.

Traditional Greek soups in Greece?

Most of the Greeks I know are from the United States - so it's been a few generations since a lot of them spent extended time in Greece.

From what I understand, Greek cuisine kind of changes. From what I can tell, in the United States, the most popular soup is Egg and Lemon soup (avgolemono) but in Greece, I don't see to as much or rather, hear of it as much.

What are the most popular soups in Greece?

Stuffed grape leaves - how much filling?

I haven't made stuffed grape leaves in a while and I have some questions.

First of all, I am having a hard time judging how much filling to put in each leaf? I have a friend who helped me and tried to explain. She'd put a teaspoon of filling in the leaf, then add or subtract more after looking at it. She's quick rolling, and I have no idea how she knows how much filling.

And she really couldn't explain it - just said that you have to look at it and it's by feel. It sounds like my yiayia and she's younger than me! I told her that and she just shrugged. She tried to talk me through it as we were rolling together but it seemed so random to me.

Best Greek Wine Regions?

I'm on a quest to discover the finest vineyards Greece has to offer. With a winemaking history that spans over four millennia, it has a rich wine tradition even though a lot of people don't know much about it.

I'd love to hear from anyone who has explored Greek wine regions or from connoisseurs who have a particular fondness for Greek varieties. What regions should I place at the top of my list, and are there any specific vineyards or wines that are absolute must-trys?

From the famed Santorini Assyrtiko to the bold reds of Nemea, I'm eager to taste and learn about the exceptional flavors and story behind each bottle. Whether it's a little-known gem or an iconic estate, I'm all ears for your recommendations.

What do you serve for Greek Easter?

With Greek Easter just around the corner, I'm getting excited to celebrate with family and friends. One of my favorite parts of this holiday is the delicious feast we enjoy together. I'm curious to hear what dishes everyone serves at their Greek Easter gatherings.

Whether you have cherished family recipes passed down through generations or you're trying something new this year, I'd love to hear about it. From traditional favorites like lamb and tzatziki to mouthwatering desserts like baklava and tsoureki, every dish adds to the festive atmosphere.

So, what's on your Greek Easter menu this year? Are there any must-have dishes or special treats that you look forward to? Feel free to share recipes, tips, or simply your excitement for the upcoming celebration. Let's swap ideas and inspire each other to make this Greek Easter memorable!

Us? We are grilling a leg of lamb and serving it with lemon potatoes and fasolakia. For dessert we are doing some kind of a chocolate cake and of course koulourakia.
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