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seleanor

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Mandola is a very popular sweet in Kefalonia and it is one of the biggest exports from the island. This treat is made of almond, honey, sugar and egg whites. The dessert has a few different variations, but is usually gluten free! The ingredients are very simple which is why they are so allergen friendly. I was doing some research and apparently these cookies are originally from the Venetian occupation in Kefalonia.
 
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Mandola is a very popular sweet in Kefalonia and it is one of the biggest exports from the island. This treat is made of almond, honey, sugar and egg whites. The dessert has a few different variations, but is usually gluten free! The ingredients are very simple which is why they are so allergen friendly. I was doing some research and apparently these cookies are originally from the Venetian occupation in Kefalonia.
Is this the Greek word for Marzipan? Sweet almond paste, right? That people bake with? The Greek versions are so delicious!
 
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This has been one of my favorite sweets over the years. Whenever family members go to Kefalonia, and when I go myself, I always make sure to get some. I would definitely try some if you are able!
 
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Is this the Greek word for Marzipan? Sweet almond paste, right? That people bake with? The Greek versions are so delicious!

Here's some more info about the desert, I've never heard of it or had it myself, it's just some info I found online
 
Mandola is a very popular sweet in Kefalonia and it is one of the biggest exports from the island. This treat is made of almond, honey, sugar and egg whites. The dessert has a few different variations, but is usually gluten free! The ingredients are very simple which is why they are so allergen friendly. I was doing some research and apparently these cookies are originally from the Venetian occupation in Kefalonia.
Indeed "mandorla" [akin to "mandola"] is the standard Italian word for "almond", from the Latin word which is from the classical Greek "amygdalE". A nice circulation of words! Even though the Greek colonization [8th century B.C.] took place in southern Italy, there was a town in Etruscan territory, near the later Venice, that the Romans found and called "amanda" [= to be loved], obviously by assimilating the name they heard to their own language: they must have heard "amygda-" [amunda-]. In the South, the second alpha turned into an omicron, as in the extant names of various places and persons: Amendolea, Amendolara, etc. // I love almonds and their products.
 
Indeed "mandorla" [akin to "mandola"] is the standard Italian word for "almond", from the Latin word which is from the classical Greek "amygdalE". A nice circulation of words! Even though the Greek colonization [8th century B.C.] took place in southern Italy, there was a town in Etruscan territory, near the later Venice, that the Romans found and called "amanda" [= to be loved], obviously by assimilating the name they heard to their own language: they must have heard "amygda-" [amunda-]. In the South, the second alpha turned into an omicron, as in the extant names of various places and persons: Amendolea, Amendolara, etc. // I love almonds and their products.
An extension rather than a reply.
I understand that the modern Greek word for Almond is Amygdalo; that is, the terminal letter of the classical word [eta] turned into an omicron rather than into a customary Doric alpha. So, the vowel shift must have taken place among the Ionians or the Athenians, probably in Byzantine times. //
The Italian word for Almond, namely Mandorla, was also used for a musical instrument in the 16th-17th century, since the front of the guitar-like instrument has the shape of an almond. It is the ancestor of the Mandolino/Mandolin [= Little Mandorla]. Its ancestor is disputed. One theory says that it was the Pandoura. This name is Greek, but apparently the instrument was played by the Akkadians [who took over Sumer in Mesopotania] in the 3rd millennium B.C. Anyway, Wikipedia shows the picture of a Tanagra statuette from about 200 B.C.: a young lady is playing a Pandoura, which has a polygonal rather than almond shape. [Tanagra was in Boeotia, north of Athens.]
Today's Bouzouki [MPoyzoyki] is a very long necked Mandorla which, they say, was introduced to Greece in 1900 from Anatolia -- exactly from where? From the former Ionia?It seems to me that the old name "Pandoura" referred to the long wooden neck/stem, rather than the body, of the instrument. [[Please add any information you may have.]]
By the way, the Akkadians assimilated the Sumerian culture and language. I have found already that this language, written in cuneiforms, was largely based on classical Greek, and so are Sanskrit, Etruscan, Anglo-Saxon, and Basque.
 
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Best Way to Observe Wildlife on Kefalonia?

I’m planning a trip to the beautiful island of Kefalonia and I’m particularly excited about the prospect of observing the local wildlife. I’ve heard that Kefalonia is home to some incredible species and natural habitats, and I want to make the most of my visit.

Could anyone provide advice on the best places to go for wildlife observation on the island? Specifically, I’m interested in:
  • Marine Life: Where are the best spots for seeing dolphins, sea turtles, and other marine creatures?
  • Bird Watching: Are there specific areas or times of year that are best for bird watching? Any species I should keep an eye out for?
  • Hiking and Nature Trails: What are the top trails or parks for encountering wildlife? Any tips on what to bring or how to prepare?
  • Unique Species: Are there any unique or rare species in Kefalonia that I should try to see? Where might I find them?
  • Guided Tours: Would you recommend any guided tours or local experts who can enhance the wildlife observation experience?
I’m open to any tips, recommendations, or personal experiences you can share. I want to ensure I have a respectful and enjoyable experience while appreciating the natural beauty of Kefalonia.

Finding out more about Assos village in Kefalonia

I am browsing through Air B nB listings for an upcoming visit to Greece and one in Assos village on Kefalonia caught my eye.

So I decided to see if I can find some information about the village to see if it is worth staying there.

From the picturesque scenery I’ve seen in photos to the glowing reviews I’ve read about its serene vibe, it seems like a must-visit spot. However, as someone who’s never been, I want to make sure I make the most out of my visit.

When is the best time to visit? What else is there to do in the village? Thanks in advance - any info you have is helpful.

Has anyone visited Myrtos Beach in Kefalonia?

I'm planning a trip to Kefalonia and have heard a lot of great things about Myrtos Beach.

Has anyone on this forum been there? I'm interested in knowing:
  • The best time of day to visit
  • Tips for parking and accessibility
  • Recommendations for nearby local eateries
  • Any must-know tips for first-time visitors (like peak times to avoid, if it's suitable for kids, etc.)
Also, if you have any suggestions for other activities or attractions nearby that are worth exploring, I'd love to hear about those too!

Local cuisine to try in Kefalonia?

I believe that one of the best ways to experience a new place is through its food, as it tells so much about its culture and traditions.

I've heard that Kefalonia boasts a vibrant culinary scene, with a variety of dishes that are as stunning as the island's landscapes. From fresh seafood to delightful sweets, I'm looking forward to tasting everything this gem in the Ionian Sea has to offer.

That being said, I would love to get your recommendations on the must-try local dishes and beverages in Kefalonia. Are there any particular restaurants, tavernas, or street food spots that left an impression on you? Additionally, if there are any local markets or food festivals that I should not miss, please do share!

Your insights will be incredibly helpful in crafting my culinary itinerary and ensuring I don't miss out on any great food. Thank you in advance for sharing your experiences and tips!

Information and Advice about Wine Tasing in Kefalonia

I've heard Kefalonia has some fantastic wineries and unique wines, but I would love to get some recommendations from those who have been there or are familiar with the area.

What are some must-visit wineries in Kefalonia? Are there any specific wine tours or tasting experiences you would recommend? Also, what local wines should I make sure to try while I'm there?

Looking forward to your suggestions and any tips you might have for making the most out of a wine-tasting adventure on this stunning island.
Share and discuss your Kefalonia photos, questions and experiences!

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