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seleanor

Active member
Mandola is a very popular sweet in Kefalonia and it is one of the biggest exports from the island. This treat is made of almond, honey, sugar and egg whites. The dessert has a few different variations, but is usually gluten free! The ingredients are very simple which is why they are so allergen friendly. I was doing some research and apparently these cookies are originally from the Venetian occupation in Kefalonia.
 
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k_tsoukalas

Moderator
Mandola is a very popular sweet in Kefalonia and it is one of the biggest exports from the island. This treat is made of almond, honey, sugar and egg whites. The dessert has a few different variations, but is usually gluten free! The ingredients are very simple which is why they are so allergen friendly. I was doing some research and apparently these cookies are originally from the Venetian occupation in Kefalonia.
Is this the Greek word for Marzipan? Sweet almond paste, right? That people bake with? The Greek versions are so delicious!
 
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kef_john68

New member
This has been one of my favorite sweets over the years. Whenever family members go to Kefalonia, and when I go myself, I always make sure to get some. I would definitely try some if you are able!
 
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acamp7

Active member
Is this the Greek word for Marzipan? Sweet almond paste, right? That people bake with? The Greek versions are so delicious!

Here's some more info about the desert, I've never heard of it or had it myself, it's just some info I found online
 

amygdalE

Member
Mandola is a very popular sweet in Kefalonia and it is one of the biggest exports from the island. This treat is made of almond, honey, sugar and egg whites. The dessert has a few different variations, but is usually gluten free! The ingredients are very simple which is why they are so allergen friendly. I was doing some research and apparently these cookies are originally from the Venetian occupation in Kefalonia.
Indeed "mandorla" [akin to "mandola"] is the standard Italian word for "almond", from the Latin word which is from the classical Greek "amygdalE". A nice circulation of words! Even though the Greek colonization [8th century B.C.] took place in southern Italy, there was a town in Etruscan territory, near the later Venice, that the Romans found and called "amanda" [= to be loved], obviously by assimilating the name they heard to their own language: they must have heard "amygda-" [amunda-]. In the South, the second alpha turned into an omicron, as in the extant names of various places and persons: Amendolea, Amendolara, etc. // I love almonds and their products.
 

amygdalE

Member
Indeed "mandorla" [akin to "mandola"] is the standard Italian word for "almond", from the Latin word which is from the classical Greek "amygdalE". A nice circulation of words! Even though the Greek colonization [8th century B.C.] took place in southern Italy, there was a town in Etruscan territory, near the later Venice, that the Romans found and called "amanda" [= to be loved], obviously by assimilating the name they heard to their own language: they must have heard "amygda-" [amunda-]. In the South, the second alpha turned into an omicron, as in the extant names of various places and persons: Amendolea, Amendolara, etc. // I love almonds and their products.
An extension rather than a reply.
I understand that the modern Greek word for Almond is Amygdalo; that is, the terminal letter of the classical word [eta] turned into an omicron rather than into a customary Doric alpha. So, the vowel shift must have taken place among the Ionians or the Athenians, probably in Byzantine times. //
The Italian word for Almond, namely Mandorla, was also used for a musical instrument in the 16th-17th century, since the front of the guitar-like instrument has the shape of an almond. It is the ancestor of the Mandolino/Mandolin [= Little Mandorla]. Its ancestor is disputed. One theory says that it was the Pandoura. This name is Greek, but apparently the instrument was played by the Akkadians [who took over Sumer in Mesopotania] in the 3rd millennium B.C. Anyway, Wikipedia shows the picture of a Tanagra statuette from about 200 B.C.: a young lady is playing a Pandoura, which has a polygonal rather than almond shape. [Tanagra was in Boeotia, north of Athens.]
Today's Bouzouki [MPoyzoyki] is a very long necked Mandorla which, they say, was introduced to Greece in 1900 from Anatolia -- exactly from where? From the former Ionia?It seems to me that the old name "Pandoura" referred to the long wooden neck/stem, rather than the body, of the instrument. [[Please add any information you may have.]]
By the way, the Akkadians assimilated the Sumerian culture and language. I have found already that this language, written in cuneiforms, was largely based on classical Greek, and so are Sanskrit, Etruscan, Anglo-Saxon, and Basque.
 
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Check out Agia Efimia, Kefalonia

Agia Efimia is a small village on the coast of Kefalonia with amazing beaches and restaurants and hotels. One of the most highly rated restaurants in the village is To Steki, which means "the hangout." The food is so fresh and I highly recommend that you visit after spending some time at the beach :)

Hiking up Mount Ainos in Kefalonia

This is one of the best hikes you can do on the island, and in the region for sure. It can be a bit difficult for those who aren't experienced, so I do recommend that you hike in a group or with a tour guide. Of course, you don't have to hike all the way up and you can travel part of the way by car. What's important is that you enjoy the views and you do as much as you can. This video showcases the stunning views for anyone who is interested in going.

Have you been to the Monastery of Themata in Kefalonia?

This monastery is one of the oldest landmarks on the island. I was so shocked to find out that it was originally built in 1096. It has been restored over time, of course, but much of the monastery remains in good condition. The name behind the monastery is debated, and its true origin is actually unknown. I've never been, but I have been doing a little bit of research about the monastery and I'm considering a visit when I go to Kefalonia this year. Has anyone on the forum been to the monastery or perhaps the nearby area of Agia Dinati Mountain?

The Kefalonia-Ithaca Geopark is now an official member of the UNESCO World Geoparks Network

This is huge news for Kefalonia and the conservation of the geopark. This means that UNESCO will play a pivotal role in supporting efforts to educate about and preserve the sustainability of the geopark. This will have an impact on tourism and help sustain some of the eco-tourism efforts that we have been seeing all around Greece. Bravo to the government and the municipality of Kefalonia!

These are the top monasteries that you should visit in Kefalonia

If you were interested in learning about the Greek Orthodox religion, monasteries are a great way to start. They represent a very traditional and preserved part of the religion, that you will not find in the church. I always recommend visiting operating monasteries so that you can get an opportunity to see the monks. Here are some of the top ones in my opinon

1. Monastery of Argilion
2. Monastery of Agios Andreas
3. Monastery of Lagouvarda
4. Monastery of Sissia
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