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dimi_pat

Active member
One goddess in Greek Mythology that has always intrigued me is Hera. I mean, it always seemed to me like Zeus put her through A LOT.

Every now and then we bump into Hera lashing out. She did that with Hercules. But I also realized that there's more to the story. After he became a full God, it seems like they had a good relationship.

So perhaps there is more to Hera than meets the eye? What do you guys think?
 
I think there is more to her than we realize. I mean, she was jealous of Hercules because of what Zeus did (cheated on her) but when he became a full God, their relationship seemed good. So maybe she was just a woman who was sick of dealing with her husband's crap!
 

Mythological Roots of the Olympic Games

I've recently found myself deeply fascinated with how ancient myths and legends have influenced modern traditions and events, particularly those with a global following. Among these, the Olympic Games stand out as a prime example of ancient traditions influencing contemporary world culture. I'm eager to learn more about the mythological roots of the Olympic Games and thought this would be the perfect community to turn to for insights.

From what I understand, the origins of the Olympics are deeply intertwined with Greek mythology. The games were held in Olympia, a sanctuary site for Greek gods, and featured various competitions and rituals dedicated to Zeus, the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion. However, my knowledge of how these mythological aspects directly influenced the establishment and evolution of the Olympic Games feels quite superficial.

Summary of the Nine Muses of Greek Mythology

I've been studying about Greek Mythology and I bumped into some information about the 9 muses. I thought I would give a summary of who they are and what they represented. I feel like the Muses are often forgotten!

In Greek mythology, the Muses were goddesses who presided over the arts and sciences, inspiring creativity and knowledge in humans. There were originally nine Muses, each with her own domain of expertise. Here's a summary of who they were:
  1. Calliope: The Muse of epic poetry and eloquence. She was often depicted with a writing tablet or a scroll.
  2. Clio: The Muse of history. She was often depicted holding a scroll or a set of tablets, symbolizing the recording of historical events.
  3. Euterpe: The Muse of music, song, and lyric poetry. She was often depicted holding a flute or a double flute.
  4. Thalia: The Muse of comedy and bucolic poetry. She was often depicted with a comic mask, a shepherd's crook, or a wreath of ivy.
  5. Melpomene: The Muse of tragedy. She was often depicted holding a tragic mask and a sword or club.
  6. Terpsichore: The Muse of dance and choral poetry. She was often depicted holding a lyre and dancing.
  7. Erato: The Muse of love poetry and lyric poetry. She was often depicted holding a lyre and a wreath of roses.
  8. Polyhymnia: The Muse of sacred poetry, hymns, and eloquence. She was often depicted in a pensive or meditative pose, sometimes holding a finger to her lips.
  9. Urania: The Muse of astronomy and astrology. She was often depicted holding a globe and a compass, symbolizing the study of celestial bodies and their movements.
Together, the Muses served as sources of inspiration for poets, musicians, artists, and scholars, guiding and nurturing creative endeavors in ancient Greek culture.

muses-greek-mythology.jpg

About Theogony by Hesiod

This poem has been one of my favorites for a while. I think everyone interested in Greek Mythology should read it! I thought I'd give you a summary:

Hesiod begins by invoking the Muses to guide him in recounting the story of the origins of the gods. He describes Chaos as the initial void from which the first gods emerged. From Chaos came Gaia (Earth), Tartarus (the Underworld), and Eros (Love), setting the stage for the creation of the cosmos.

Gaia gives birth to Uranus (the Sky), who becomes her husband and the father of the Titans, Cyclopes, and Hecatoncheires (Hundred-Handed Ones). Uranus, fearing the power of his offspring, imprisons them within Gaia's womb. Gaia urges her children to rebel, and her Titan son Cronus castrates Uranus, seizing power for himself.

Cronus becomes the ruler of the cosmos but fears a prophecy that one of his children will overthrow him. To prevent this, he swallows each of his children upon their birth, except for Zeus, who is saved by his mother Rhea and hidden away. Zeus grows up and defeats Cronus, establishing himself as the king of the gods.

The poem then describes the Titanomachy, the epic battle between Zeus and the Titans, which ends with the Titans' defeat and their imprisonment in Tartarus. Zeus and his siblings, the Olympian gods, become the rulers of the cosmos.

The narrative continues with the story of the Gigantomachy, the battle between the gods and the Giants, and other myths surrounding the gods' interactions with mortals and each other.

Greek God or Goddess About Cooking?

I've recently been diving into mythology and am particularly fascinated by Greek mythology. I was wondering, are there any Greek gods or goddesses associated with cooking or cuisine?

I know the Greeks had gods and goddesses for various aspects of life, and I'm curious if the culinary arts were represented in any way. Thanks in advance!

Information about Chaos from Greek Mythology?

I’m currently delving into Greek mythology and have become particularly fascinated with the concept of Chaos. From what I understand, Chaos is often described as the primeval void or the initial state of the universe before the creation of the cosmos. However, I’m looking for more detailed information on this topic.

Could anyone provide insights or resources on the following?
  • What are the origins of Chaos in Greek mythology, and what role does it play in the creation myths?
  • Are there specific ancient texts or authors that provide the most comprehensive descriptions of Chaos?
  • How is Chaos symbolically represented in Greek mythology, and what does it signify in the broader context of ancient Greek culture and philosophy?
  • Resources that you can recommend so I can dive in...
Thanks so much!
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