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John Stefan

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What historical evidence is there that the Trojan War actually Happened? I Look forward to some replies.
 
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This will always be a mystery to me!
 
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Story of the Birth of Democracy

I just watched a nice documentary about the birth of democracy in Athens. This is so fascinating! I didn't realize the nuances, only the basics about how it began in Athens. This documentary goes into a lot more detail.

What did the Ancient Greeks eat?

I am fascinated by the Ancient Greeks. I have a feeling that some of our modern Greek recipes are similar to the ancient ones. Like spoon sweets. It think that seems like something that was developed a long time ago as a way to preserve the fruit harvest.

So, I have been researching this. What did the Ancient Greeks eat? I wanted to share this video because I thought it was interesting.

Studying the Trojan War - Was it Real?

Did the Trojan War really happen? I am doing a bit of research and wanted to know what you guys thought:

The war is believed to have happened around 1200 BCE, and while there is no concrete evidence to support its occurrence, it is widely accepted as factual.

What is confusing me is how prevalent it is in Greek Mythology. In addition to the gods' involvement in the conflict, various stories and legends were added over time to give the tale more depth and drama. For example, the character of Achilles was said to be invulnerable except for his heel, which led to the phrase "Achilles heel" being used to describe a person's one weakness.

While some scholars once dismissed the Trojan War as pure myth, modern archaeological evidence has suggested that it may have been a real event. Excavations at the ancient site of Troy have revealed evidence of a long period of conflict and destruction, and historians have found similarities between the tale as it is told in ancient texts and what is known about the region's history at the time. While many details of the Trojan War are still shrouded in mystery, it seems increasingly likely that it was not just a legend but a real event that has been passed down through the ages.

Learning about the Spartan way of life

I find the Spartans fascinating. They seemed to have a different way of life!

The Spartans, known for their military might, also led a lifestyle that was remarkably disciplined and focused on simplicity.

The core of Spartan society was its military-oriented ethos. From a young age, Spartan boys were trained to be soldiers in the agoge, a rigorous education system that emphasized physical training, endurance, and survival skills. This preparation was not just about warfare but about creating individuals who were resilient, self-sufficient, and disciplined.

But Spartan discipline extended beyond the military sphere. Spartans lived a life of austerity and frugality that is quite alien to our modern way of living. Meals were simple, homes were unadorned, and luxuries were frowned upon. This was not out of a lack of resources but a deliberate choice to avoid softness and dependency on material comforts.

Interestingly, this Spartan simplicity also fostered a sense of equality among citizens. By eschewing luxury, Spartans aimed to reduce divisions within their society. Wealth and status were downplayed, while military prowess and moral integrity were valued above all.

What do you guys think about this or what can you add to my thinking?

My Top Favorite Greek Philosophers

There are too many philosophers to count, but these are the ones I am studying at the moment. It's fascinating to me how influential the Greek philosophers are. Here's some things I am learning:

#1 Socrates

If philosophy had a poster boy, Socrates might very well be it. The father of Western philosophy, Socrates was a gadfly to Athenian society, questioning everything and Master to Plato. Known for the Socratic Method and his unflinching commitment to truth, Socrates' influence is immeasurable despite never having written a word.

#2 Plato

Rightly succeeding his mentor on this list, Plato's Academy saw him birth the first "university" of its kind. His unabashed idealism, immortal Forms, allegories like the Cave, and the pursuit of 'The Good' in moral philosophy set the stage for much intellectual discourse.

#3 Aristotle

Aristotle, another of Plato's students, had a more grounded approach to philosophy than his predecessor. With establishing principles of logic and reason, and contributions to virtually every field of academia, from poetry to physics, Aristotle's body of work remains foundational.

#4 Heraclitus

Heraclitus, famed for the idea that "change is the only constant," viewed the cosmos through a lens of process, flux, and an everlasting Logos that governs the world. Although little of his work survives, his influence on ancient and modern thinkers is profound.

#5 Epicurus

Known for his eponymous philosophy, Epicurus taught that the greatest good is to seek modest pleasures in order to attain a state of tranquility, freedom from fear (ataraxia), and absence of bodily pain (aponia). Often misunderstood, Epicureanism is starkly different from the modern use of 'epicurean' - it's much less about a luxury lifestyle and more about ethical considerations regarding personal fulfillment.
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