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mastichas09

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I am trying to learn more about the history of the Orthodox Church in Greece. I know that there are some Bible passages that mention the Apostle Paul being in Greece, but I am not clear on the actual history.

For example, Ephesians was written about "Ephesus", which was part of Greece at that time. But, when I read the Bible I like to have more of an historical context. I am sure this information exists, I am just not sure where.
 
I am trying to learn more about the history of the Orthodox Church in Greece. I know that there are some Bible passages that mention the Apostle Paul being in Greece, but I am not clear on the actual history.

For example, Ephesians was written about "Ephesus", which was part of Greece at that time. But, when I read the Bible I like to have more of an historical context. I am sure this information exists, I am just not sure where.
The Orthodox Study Bible, the one with the OT and NT, has a good synopsis of the history of each of the gospels and the epistles. It is available from Amazon. There is a cheaper on line version. I didn't see it on Amazon but you can check. I find navigating within the on line version difficult.
 
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I agree about the Orthodox Study Bible. Koine Greek was the main language of the New Testament, so Greece was important. Off the top of my head, Ephesians was written in "Greece" (it's in Turkey now, but at the time it was part of Greece), I and II Corinthians (written in Corinth), and the book of Revelations was written in a place called the Cave of the Apocalypse in Patmos, Greece. There could be more, but I am not sure.
 
The Orthodox Study Bible, the one with the OT and NT, has a good synopsis of the history of each of the gospels and the epistles. It is available from Amazon. There is a cheaper on line version. I didn't see it on Amazon but you can check. I find navigating within the on line version difficult.
All of you, Above Writers, do well in pointing out that, for example, Letters in the NT were addressed to newly formed Xian communities/churches [Ephesus, Corinth, etc.], but unfortunately did not refer to sources about the other half of the organized religion, namely the liturgy -- e.g., the Eucharistic Service which was also copied and developed in Rome as the Mass. Some Greek phrases-- were left untranslated and are still used in the Latin liturgy. [This new Pope --a communist and a heretic -- is about to eliminate the use of Latin....] Some church music -- antiphonal -- was fruitfully brought to Italy in the 4th century.
 
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Hmmm... does anyone know of a book I can read besides the study Bible that could give some information? There really isn't much online! Thank you to those who have chimed in so far!
 

History of the Greek flag?

I never really stopped to think about the history of the Greek flag and I want to share that knowledge with my kids. I need to figure out what it is first. I have this feeling the history is rich because I've seen different, older versions of the flag.

Could anyone shed some light on the following aspects:
  • Origins: When was the Greek flag officially adopted, and were there any significant events that led to its creation?
  • Symbolism: What do the colors and the cross represent? Are there any historical or cultural significance behind these elements?
  • Evolution: Has the flag undergone any changes throughout the years? If so, what prompted these changes?
  • Legends/Myths: Are there any interesting legends or anecdotes surrounding the inception or adoption of the flag?
Thanks!

Cave Divers Capture Breathtaking Footage of Lake Vouliagmeni Tunnels.

Posting this takes me back to my years living in Ano Glyfada when I often wandered what and why was there a lake in Vouliagmeni!Underwander!
The season finale shows how there were once elephants living on the island of Crete, but, most importantly, it sees the team return to Lake Vouliagmeni, where they make yet another breakthrough.... Fascinating how our world and eachother are connected!👏🌍🌎🙏
https://greekreporter.com/2024/05/0...athtaking+Footage+of+Lake+Vouliagmeni+Tunnels

Learning about Greek Independence Day

March 25th marks a significant celebration in Greece, but I realize my knowledge on its historical context is quite limited.

From what I understand, this day commemorates the start of the War of Greek Independence in 1821, where Greece sought to end several centuries of Ottoman rule. However, I'm eager to learn more about the intricacies of this period, the key figures involved, and how the struggle for independence unfolded over time.

Additionally, I'd be interested in understanding how this day is celebrated across Greece today and whether any particular traditions are tied to it. For example, are there specific ceremonies, parades, or family traditions that uniquely mark this day in Greek culture?


Greek-flag.jpg

Question about Greece during WWI

I am trying to learn more about Greek history. This is a family project! What I am learning about now is Greece's involvement in WWI. From what I've gathered, Greece had a rather complex and interesting stance during World War I, but I'm looking for more in-depth information.

Could anyone here provide insights or point me towards resources that detail:

  1. Greece's political climate leading up to its involvement in WWI.
  2. The significance of the National Schism and how it affected Greece's participation.
  3. Key battles or military campaigns that Greek forces were involved in.
Thanks so much!

Greek Independence Day History

Greek Independence Day is coming up! I thought I would share a bit that I know about the history. Please chime in with corrections or anything to add!
  1. The Spark of Revolution: Greek Independence Day marks the day in 1821 when the Greeks began their revolt against the Ottoman Empire, a state that had controlled Greece for nearly 400 years. This revolt was influenced by the surge of nationalism throughout Europe and inspired by the Enlightenment ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity.
  2. A Poet’s Declaration: The revolution officially began after Bishop Germanos of Patras raised the Greek flag at the Monastery of Agia Lavra in Peloponnese, symbolizing the call to arms. However, it was rumored that the war of independence was actually declared a few days earlier by Alexandros Ypsilantis, a Greek national hero, in the Danubian Principalities.
  3. International Support: The Greek fight for independence was not just a local effort; it garnered substantial international support from prominent figures such as Lord Byron from Britain, who notably spent his own money and later died in Greece, contributing to the Greek cause. This international backing was crucial for the morale of the Greek fighters and helped in diplomatic efforts later on.
  4. The Battle of Navarino: A pivotal point in the Greek War of Independence was the Battle of Navarino in 1827, where the combined fleets of Britain, France, and Russia defeated the Ottoman and Egyptian fleets. This naval battle marked a significant turning point that led to the eventual independence of Greece.
  5. Recognition and Autonomy: Greek Independence was formally recognized in 1830 by the Treaty of London. However, full sovereignty and the delineation of the Greek borders were not achieved until later. It allowed the foundation of the modern Greek state, under the governance of King Otto from Bavaria.
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