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nm1999

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Homer is my favorite Greek philosopher of all time! His influence is still felt today and its even required readings for many high school and university courses. Who is your favorite Greek philosopher?

Homer.jpg
 
My vote for favorite Greek philosopher is Socrates! 🇬🇷🇬🇷🇬🇷
 
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Homer is my favorite Greek philosopher of all time! His influence is still felt today and its even required readings for many high school and university courses. Who is your favorite Greek philosopher?

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Homer is my favorite Greek philosopher of all time! His influence is still felt today and its even required readings for many high school and university courses. Who is your favorite Greek philosopher?

I understood what you meant by your question, but I still have a problem with the word "philosophy"since neither the Iliad nor the Odyssey are written in the dialogue style of Plato, or in the prose style of most philosophers who discuss a topic "in the abstract". Poets like Homer and novelists like Camus and cultural essayists like Nietzsche -- just to mention three names, are "thinkers" or observrs of human conditions, and express their wisdom or insights in concrete social contexts [such as a war, a tourist adventure, an imaginary journey, a published/literary drama (like Sophocles' Oedipus Rex) , etc. So, I distinguish Philosophy Proper [done in the abstract] and Adventitious Philosophy [done in the concrete, in described world situations]. // I, too, love Homer, a great philosophical poet!// Historians, like Polybios, can also be philosophical, This is one of his oft-quoted observations: There is no witness so dreadful, no accuser so terrible as the conscious [conscience] that dwells in the heart of every man.
 
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About My Favorite Greek Goddess Aphrodite

I have been researching Aphrodite, one of my favorite goddesses. I put this together based on my research.

Aphrodite was the goddess of love, beauty, and sexuality. She was regarded as the most beautiful and desired goddess in all of Greek mythology. (I think that might be why she fascinates me!)

Aphrodite's origin story is interesting. It's said that she was born from the sea foam created when the Titan Cronus cut off the genitals of his father Ouranos. She was the goddess of love, beauty, and sexuality, with her appearance at times described as pure beauty itself. She is often depicted with a flowing garment that barely covers her curves, and barefooted standing on a pedestal, highlighting her goddess-like beauty.

According to Greek legends, Aphrodite fell in love with many gods, mortals, and even animals, which often resulted in chaotic and tragic events. It is said that she helped cause the Trojan War by causing the love triangle between Paris, the Prince of Troy, and Helen, who was the wife of the Menelaus of Sparta. The story proved her power's influence and the chaos that follows her love.

Aphrodite was also a patron of love and marriage, and apparently married to the god Hephaestus, who fell in love with her beauty alongside all the Greek gods. This marriage was a politically motivated decision of Hera, whose husband Zeus had numerous affairs and that caused constant jealousy between their married life. Needless to say, Aphrodite was having none of it, with her notable lovers being Ares, Adonis, and Anchises.

Aphrodite's influence can be seen even today with countless works of art inspired by her beauty. That is why I love lear about her. She seemed to embody the feminine spirit.

goddess-aphrodite.jpg

Afterlife Beliefs in Greek Mythology?

What did Ancient Greeks believe about the afterlife? I've heard a few different stories... I'm particularly drawn to Ancient Greece's take on life after death.

Was there a uniform belief system, or did it vary significantly among different cities or periods? How did their beliefs influence their daily life and practices? I'm also curious about the role of mythological figures like Hades and the concept of Elysium.

If anyone has any expertise, recommended readings, or can point me to resources where I might be able to gather detailed insights into these spiritual aspects of Ancient Greek culture, I would greatly appreciate it.

Mythological Roots of the Olympic Games

I've recently found myself deeply fascinated with how ancient myths and legends have influenced modern traditions and events, particularly those with a global following. Among these, the Olympic Games stand out as a prime example of ancient traditions influencing contemporary world culture. I'm eager to learn more about the mythological roots of the Olympic Games and thought this would be the perfect community to turn to for insights.

From what I understand, the origins of the Olympics are deeply intertwined with Greek mythology. The games were held in Olympia, a sanctuary site for Greek gods, and featured various competitions and rituals dedicated to Zeus, the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion. However, my knowledge of how these mythological aspects directly influenced the establishment and evolution of the Olympic Games feels quite superficial.

Was the Trojan War real?

I have been wondering, was the Trojan War real? I decided to explore the topic. I still don't know. What do you guys think?

Let's start with the basics. According to ancient Greek mythology, the Trojan War was fought between the Greeks and the Trojans over Helen of Troy. Helen, the wife of King Menelaus, was said to be the most beautiful woman in the world. When she was kidnapped by Paris of Troy, her husband called upon the Greek army to help him get her back. The war lasted ten years, according to the myth, and ended with the Greeks claiming victory when they used a wooden horse to get inside the walls of Troy.

It's easy to dismiss this story as nothing more than a legend, but there is some archaeological evidence that suggests that there may be some truth to the tale. In the 1870s, a German businessman named Heinrich Schliemann claimed to have found the site of ancient Troy in modern-day Turkey. He found evidence of a walled city with multiple layers of ruins, which might have been the result of multiple attacks over time. Whether or not this was the site of the Trojan War is still up for debate, but it's clear that Schliemann believed that he had discovered the home of king Priam and the legendary Trojan horse.

That said, not everyone agrees with Schliemann's findings. In fact, some scholars argue that the city he found wasn't actually Troy at all, but another nearby city with a similar name. Others point out that the ruins he found don't quite match up with the descriptions of the city in the Iliad. Additionally, there is evidence that suggests that the Trojan War didn't happen exactly as it was told in the myth. For example, it's possible that the conflict arose over economic disputes rather than the kidnapping of Helen.

Despite the disagreements among scholars, one thing is for sure: The Trojan War has had a lasting impact on culture and has become one of the most well-known stories from Greek mythology. It has been retold in countless books, movies, and TV shows over the years, and the characters from the story continue to inspire us today. The Trojan hero Hector, for example, has become synonymous with bravery, while Odysseus's journey home has been the inspiration for many other epic tales.

Janus - God of Beginnings

I learned recently of Janus, the Roman God of Beginnings. The month January, I believe, is named after this God.

Many of the Roman Gods and Goddesses have Greek counterparts. Does Janus?

If so, I think that would be an interesting god to learn about. I have to be honest - I am not sure there is a counterpart. I have been searching but there either isn't enough information online, or there really is no equivalent.

Do you guys have any idea?
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