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greek_ggirl

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What is the story behind Zeus?? How did be become so powerful?
 
Zeus has always been one of my favorites!

Here is a ton of information about the king of gods within Greek mythology:
 
Zeus has always been one of my favorites!

Here is a ton of information about the king of gods within Greek mythology:
The Greekboston article does a good job in re-telling myths about Zeus and seems to answer the question by referring to the choice by lot between him, Poseidon, and Hades, but I see that the mythographer already knew the 3 brothers as lords of the 3 kingdoms. So, we should inquire why, for the original myth-makers, Zeus was most powerful. Their power is measured by their deeds. Well, since the gods are not observable anthropomorphic realities, there are no deeds available for consideration: we must look for natural events (that affect humans), such as storms, volcanic fires, violent winds, etc., that some humans called Theoi or by some other name. Later, such nature-forces were personified and resulted in the mythic pantheon we are familiar with. As personified, Zeus used to gather clouds, to be the arbiter of wars, etc. ,but to begin with, Zeus was a hurricane or the like, whereas his brothers are minor forces (which we may have even difficulty idenifying). Anyway, the gods -- such gods -- are the most evident, conspicuous, realities in the world; there is no need to prove their existence by argumentation....
 
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The Greekboston article does a good job in re-telling myths about Zeus and seems to answer the question by referring to the choice by lot between him, Poseidon, and Hades, but I see that the mythographer already knew the 3 brothers as lords of the 3 kingdoms. So, we should inquire why, for the original myth-makers, Zeus was most powerful. Their power is measured by their deeds. Well, since the gods are not observable anthropomorphic realities, there are no deeds available for consideration: we must look for natural events (that affect humans), such as storms, volcanic fires, violent winds, etc., that some humans called Theoi or by some other name. Later, such nature-forces were personified and resulted in the mythic pantheon we are familiar with. As personified, Zeus used to gather clouds, to be the arbiter of wars, etc. ,but to begin with, Zeus was a harricane or the like, whereas his brothers are minor forces (which we may have even difficulty idenifying). Anyway, the gods are the most evident, conspicuous, realities in the world; there is no need to prove their existence....
An addition to my above reply: As we already know, "Hades" was the name of a god as well as of his abode, namely the dark and quiet underworld. So, I presume that our experiential basis of the god is some cave which was dangerous, menacing, such as a cave/cavern with wild animals. We have a clue for this in the fact that Kerberos and some other monsters were [in myths] guardians of the entrance and, in other myths or suppositions, guards to prevent the escape of the dead. The interior of some such caves had streams of waters or rivers, wherefore Orphics who died were warned not to drink from the Lethe river (and thus obliterate their memory or consciousness_). [For instance, this warning was written down on gold-leaf tablets which have been discovered at Thourioi, a city in Greek-colonized southern Italy, from which refugees founded my native town some miles away around 204 B.C.] Example: A cave with such an interior existed also in S. Italy, near Naples/Neapolis and Kymae (where there was the oracle of the Cumaean sibyl). // What could be the natural basis of Poseidon? He was also known as the god of fresh waters -- rivers and springs. Hence I suppose that harmful floodings, of rivers and of the sea, begot the idea of a god close in nature or power to Zeus and Hades.
 
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The Greekboston article does a good job in re-telling myths about Zeus and seems to answer the question by referring to the choice by lot between him, Poseidon, and Hades, but I see that the mythographer already knew the 3 brothers as lords of the 3 kingdoms. So, we should inquire why, for the original myth-makers, Zeus was most powerful. Their power is measured by their deeds. Well, since the gods are not observable anthropomorphic realities, there are no deeds available for consideration: we must look for natural events (that affect humans), such as storms, volcanic fires, violent winds, etc., that some humans called Theoi or by some other name. Later, such nature-forces were personified and resulted in the mythic pantheon we are familiar with. As personified, Zeus used to gather clouds, to be the arbiter of wars, etc. ,but to begin with, Zeus was a harricane or the like, whereas his brothers are minor forces (which we may have even difficulty idenifying). Anyway, the gods are the most evident, conspicuous, realities in the world; there is no need to prove their existence....
So what you're saying is that because he had control over hurricanes (most affect on humans) he was the most powerful?
 
So what you're saying is that because he had control over hurricanes (most affect on humans) he was the most powerful?
You see, I do not believe that the gods are products of the human imagination; I think that some events and some things around us are very powerful and, so to speak, awakened human consciousness and we named them. So, originally, hurricanes, volcanic fires, typhoons, etc., were what we call gods. Later on, humans thought of them as persons and developed the myths we are familiar with. Zeus, otherwise called Za and Deus [in Aeolic and in Latin], was originally a devastating storm. (Unlike Hesiod, the 7h cent. B.C. organizer of myths or theogonist, I do aetiology of gods: I seek the experienced causes/bases of their emergence.) //Inspired by Vico's "New Science" (18th Century), I venture to say, "en archE logos" -- in the beginning [of mankind] was the word, the names of the gods. Don't be offended for my use of your evangelical words, O John of Ephesus, who anyway walked on the footsteps of Heracleitos of the same city.
Zeus has always been one of my favorites!

Here is a ton of information about the king of gods within Greek mythology:

The Greekboston article does a good job in re-telling myths about Zeus and seems to answer the question by referring to the choice by lot between him, Poseidon, and Hades, but I see that the mythographer already knew the 3 brothers as lords of the 3 kingdoms. So, we should inquire why, for the original myth-makers, Zeus was most powerful. Their power is measured by their deeds. Well, since the gods are not observable anthropomorphic realities, there are no deeds available for consideration: we must look for natural events (that affect humans), such as storms, volcanic fires, violent winds, etc., that some humans called Theoi or by some other name. Later, such nature-forces were personified and resulted in the mythic pantheon we are familiar with. As personified, Zeus used to gather clouds, to be the arbiter of wars, etc. ,but to begin with, Zeus was a harricane or the like, whereas his brothers are minor forces (which we may have even difficulty idenifying). Anyway, the gods are the most evident, conspicuous, realities in the world; there is no need to prove their existence....
 
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You see, I do not believe that the gods are products of the human imagination; I think that some events and some things around us are very powerful and, so to speak, awakened human consciousness and we named them. So, originally, hurricanes, volcanic fires, typhoons, etc., were what we call gods. Later on, humans thought of them as persons and developed the myths we are familiar with. Zeus, otherwise called Za and Deus [in Aeolic and in Latin], was originally a devastating storm. (Unlike Hesiod, the 7h cent. B.C. organizer of myths or theogonist, I do aetiology of gods: I seek the experienced causes/bases of their emergence.) //Inspired by Vico's "New Science" (18th Century), I venture to say, "en archE logos" -- in the beginning [of mankind] was the word, the names of the gods. Don't be offended for my use of your evangelical words, O John of Ephesus, who anyway walked on the footsteps of Heracleitos of the same city.
Very interesting theory, I like to think that that's what the Ancient Greeks believed :)
 
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12 Olympian Gods and Goddesses

I love mythology and I thought I'd make list of the 12 Olympian Gods and Goddesses. This is my best guess. Do you know that I have seen different versions of this? What do you think?
  1. Zeus: The king of the gods, ruler of the sky and thunder, and the god of law, order, and justice.
  2. Hera: The queen of the gods, Zeus's wife and sister, and the goddess of marriage and childbirth.
  3. Poseidon: The god of the sea, earthquakes, and horses, often depicted with a trident.
  4. Demeter: The goddess of agriculture, fertility, and the harvest, responsible for the cycle of life and death in crops.
  5. Athena: The goddess of wisdom, warfare, strategy, and crafts, often associated with strategic warfare and civilization.
  6. Apollo: The god of music, poetry, prophecy, healing, and archery, known for his wisdom and beauty.
  7. Artemis: The goddess of the hunt, wilderness, childbirth, and virginity, often depicted with a bow and arrows.
  8. Ares: The god of war, violence, and bloodshed, embodying the brutal aspects of conflict.
  9. Aphrodite: The goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation, born from the sea foam and known for her irresistible charm.
  10. Hephaestus: The god of fire, blacksmiths, craftsmen, and volcanoes, renowned for his skill in metalworking.
  11. Hermes: The messenger of the gods, associated with travel, commerce, communication, and trickery.
  12. Dionysus: The god of wine, fertility, ecstasy, and theatre, representing the joyous aspects of life and celebration.
greek-gods.jpg

Thesmorphia - Ancient Greek Thanksgiving Festival

I have heard this festival described as an "Ancient Greek Thanksgiving" so I thought I would look it up. Very interesting! I don't see the "Thanksgiving" connection (not the way we in the US think of it) but I thought it was interesting because it goes to show you that gratitude-related festivals are an ancient concept. And it is a harvest festival, just like our US Thanksgiving is...

Some information I have gathered:

The Thesmorphia festival was celebrated on the 11th of Pyanepsion, which corresponds to late October or early November in the modern Gregorian calendar. The festival was a three-day affair, and it was observed mainly by women. During the festival, women were not allowed to sleep with their husbands, and purification rituals were performed at the temples of Demeter and Persephone. On the first day, the first fruits of the harvest were offered to Demeter, and a feast was held in her honor. On the second day, a procession was held, and women walked around the fields carrying torches, symbolizing the power of Demeter. The third day was a joyous celebration, and the remnants of the feast were donated to the poor.

The Thesmorphia festival was significant for many reasons. Firstly, it celebrated the end of the harvesting season, and it was a time to give thanks for a good crop. The festival was also a time for women to come together, and it was an opportunity for them to assert their power and influence in the society. Women played a significant role in the festival, and they were responsible for the preparation of the feast and various other aspects of the festival.

The festival was also significant in terms of its religious and mythological significance. Demeter was the goddess of agriculture, and Persephone was her young daughter, who was kidnapped by Hades, the god of the underworld. The story of Persephone reflects the cycle of life, death, and resurrection. The festival of Thesmorphia was an opportunity to honor these two goddesses and their mythology, which highlighted the importance of the harvest and the cycle of life.

Another reason why the Thesmorphia festival was significant was that it was a time for the community to come together and celebrate. The feast was an opportunity to share food, drink, and stories and build camaraderie amongst members of the community. During the festival, people forgot their differences and came together to celebrate the bounty of the harvest.

Janus - God of Beginnings

I learned recently of Janus, the Roman God of Beginnings. The month January, I believe, is named after this God.

Many of the Roman Gods and Goddesses have Greek counterparts. Does Janus?

If so, I think that would be an interesting god to learn about. I have to be honest - I am not sure there is a counterpart. I have been searching but there either isn't enough information online, or there really is no equivalent.

Do you guys have any idea?

Accurate movies about Greek mythology?

I am looking for some "accurate" movies that have Greek mythological topics. I say "accurate" because how can we really even know? Many of the stories were handed down through the generations, and some even may have been lost. I guess I mean accurate according to what has been established from works that have survived.

I found this video - has anyone watched these?

Afterlife Beliefs in Greek Mythology?

What did Ancient Greeks believe about the afterlife? I've heard a few different stories... I'm particularly drawn to Ancient Greece's take on life after death.

Was there a uniform belief system, or did it vary significantly among different cities or periods? How did their beliefs influence their daily life and practices? I'm also curious about the role of mythological figures like Hades and the concept of Elysium.

If anyone has any expertise, recommended readings, or can point me to resources where I might be able to gather detailed insights into these spiritual aspects of Ancient Greek culture, I would greatly appreciate it.
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