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blopez34

Active member
I got turned onto this salad recently and I realize that it's such a nice change of pace from the salads I usually make. I love how it doesn't use lettuce because I don't always seem to have it on hand.

Here is the combination I like for mine. How do you guys like making it?

- tomatoes
- cucumber
- green bell peppers
- red onion or scallion
- kalamata olives
- feta cheese
- plenty of olive oil
- oregano

I like it a bit room temperature so after I make it, I set it on the counter for maybe 45 minutes before I dive in. It also gives the flavors a chance to meld together. I would like to try making other combinations!
 

k_tsoukalas

Moderator
So, I don't like raw onions and I love capers. So, this is what I do - it is a bit different than what you listed, but your version sounds good too:

- tomatoes
- cucumbers
- Greek olives of any kind
- Feta
- Caper berries (the big berries)
- Bell peppers of any color
- Fresh oregano from my plant!
- Greek olive oil that I brought back from Crete
 
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Luana

New member
I got turned onto this salad recently and I realize that it's such a nice change of pace from the salads I usually make. I love how it doesn't use lettuce because I don't always seem to have it on hand.

Here is the combination I like for mine. How do you guys like making it?

- tomatoes
- cucumber
- green bell peppers
- red onion or scallion
- kalamata olives
- feta cheese
- plenty of olive oil
- oregano

I like it a bit room temperature so after I make it, I set it on the counter for maybe 45 minutes before I dive in. It also gives the flavors a chance to meld together. I would like to try making other combinations!
That sounds good to me. You do need some kind of acid in the dressing, either vinegar (red wine, not white) or lemon juice. I prefer vinegar. While traditional Greek salad does not have lettuce, some of us here in the US use lettuce, nothing wrong with that. While some use a variety of parts of each, I like close to equal parts of oil and vinegar, with the vinegar being less in proportion. Have seen many recipes that use Dijon mustard in the dressing, but I've not used that, don't recall anyone in my family using it either.

The oregano should be Greek oregano, either purchased at an ethnic grocery or online. Do you know the variety you're growing? If you like it, that's fine. But an FYI, oregano in regular grocery stores, is not the right flavor. Greek oregano is fairly strong and pungent and makes its presence known!

As for other ingredients, some garbanzo beans are nice, maybe a bit of chopped fresh parsley or some sliced radishes, sometimes I'll add a bit of chopped fresh mint, if I have it. I chop one or two cloves of garlic and let sit in the vinegar for about 10 minutes, as it takes away the rawness of the garlic, and combine that with the olive oil, usually shake in a jar, and pour on salad.

I like the salad best at room temp like you said; it's not the same cold, especially the tomatoes.
 
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blopez34

Active member
That sounds good to me. You do need some kind of acid in the dressing, either vinegar (red wine, not white) or lemon juice. I prefer vinegar. While traditional Greek salad does not have lettuce, some of us here in the US use lettuce, nothing wrong with that. While some use a variety of parts of each, I like close to equal parts of oil and vinegar, with the vinegar being less in proportion. Have seen many recipes that use Dijon mustard in the dressing, but I've not used that, don't recall anyone in my family using it either.

The oregano should be Greek oregano, either purchased at an ethnic grocery or online. Do you know the variety you're growing? If you like it, that's fine. But an FYI, oregano in regular grocery stores, is not the right flavor. Greek oregano is fairly strong and pungent and makes its presence known!

As for other ingredients, some garbanzo beans are nice, maybe a bit of chopped fresh parsley or some sliced radishes, sometimes I'll add a bit of chopped fresh mint, if I have it. I chop one or two cloves of garlic and let sit in the vinegar for about 10 minutes, as it takes away the rawness of the garlic, and combine that with the olive oil, usually shake in a jar, and pour on salad.

I like the salad best at room temp like you said; it's not the same cold, especially the tomatoes.

These are great tips! I am hesitant about the acid because when the tomatoes are fresh and the juices puddle at the bottom, that seems to have enough acid for my tastes, especially when mixed with the other flavors. But I did notice that when the tomatoes aren't as fresh, the salad could benefit from some acid. I think I am going to start! Thanks for the insights.
 

Luana

New member
You're welcome! I do think wine vinegar is an important part of the dressing. Some use ratios that are almost equal, though you could use 3 parts oil to 1 part vinegar. You might want to try it that way first, and you can always increase the vinegar, and use what you like tastes the best.
 
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blopez34

Active member
You're welcome! I do think wine vinegar is an important part of the dressing. Some use ratios that are almost equal, though you could use 3 parts oil to 1 part vinegar. You might want to try it that way first, and you can always increase the vinegar, and use what you like tastes the best.
I have realized it definitely depends on my mood. Thank you for weighing in!
 

Making Gluten Free Pasta for Greek Recipes

I have some people in my life who need a gluten free diet. When I have them over, I like to accommodate. However, it is easier said than done sometimes. I find that most other people don't even notice if I sneak a gluten free pasta in my Greek food here and there. I know I could always substitute rice for some dishes, but in some cases I really do feel I need to use the pasta.

I have a hard time finding the gluten free pasta that I need, so I was thinking to make it. I make pasta with gluten all the time but my first gluten free attempt was a disaster. It fell apart and I felt I didn't know how to control the dough.

Do you guys have any advice?

Tiropita Recipe from Cooking Greek Cookbook

Making tiropita at home is fun and a lot easier than it may seem - especially when doing it in a 9 x 13 pan. Although I have used different combinations of cheeses, the version I like the best includes imported feta and then a soft cheese like anthotyro if I can find it, cottage cheese if I can't. I live in the United States and there is a Greek store near me that has that cheese, but I find that cottage cheese is just as good. This recipe is light and flaky and makes a great appetizer, snack, light meal (when served with soup or salad) and I've even had it for breakfast!

Check out the Cooking Greek Cookbook by Worldwide Greeks out on Hardcover, Paperback and eBook here!

tiropita-recipe.jpg

Greek Thanksgiving "Stuffing" Recipe?

Thanksgiving is coming up, and I am trying to track down a recipe. I had a Greek friend verbally describe what this is, but I need a recipe to follow if someone can help me out. His family recipe involves:
  • Onion
  • Ground beef
  • Rice
  • Water or broth
  • All spice, cinnamon, oregano (I thought he said oregano but I am not 100%)
  • Roasted chestnuts
I think maybe I can guess that the onion is sautéed, the ground beef needs to be browned, the rice is stirred in and water or broth is added, and the chestnuts are roasted separately and stirred in at the end?

Thanks for your help! I am learning that Greek cooks have most of their recipes in their brains.

Lemon Potatoes Recipe from Cooking Greek Cookbook

Lemon potatoes is one of my all time favorite Greek dishes. I love the way the lemon tastes with potatoes, and it tends to pair well with just about every main course I could serve, but most especially poultry or seafood. Basically, if I've seasoned the meat I am serving with lemon, I tend to prefer these potatoes over other ways to prepare potatoes. The lemon also lightens up the dish, and the whole meal pairs well with salad or other vegetable side dishes. It's also easy to put together. I try to use fresh lemons because that elevates the dish to another level.

Check out the Cooking Greek Cookbook by Worldwide Greeks out on Hardcover, Paperback and eBook here!

greek-lemon-potatoes-recipe.jpg

What if I don't have Greek yogurt?

I don't always have Greek yogurt on hand. I tend not to keep it in the fridge and only buy it when I need it. I do, however, tend to have plain, regular yogurt.

Can I substitute that in recipes if I make something Greek at the last minute?

I have heard of some people straining it through cheesecloth. If you guys recommend I do that, How long does it need to strain?
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