1 - 4 of 4 Posts

nm1999

Active member
I'm going to a Greek wedding this summer as someone's plus one, and I really have no idea how to dress for the wedding. My date isn't really giving me a lot of advice, and she doesn't usually go to a lot of Greek weddings herself, so I'm a bit clueless. If anyone could give me advice on how formal Greek weddings usually are, I would really appreciate it.
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
Is the wedding in Greece? If so, then there is no dress code, it's anything goes - men will be in jeans and a polo/dress shirt, khakis and a polo/dress shirt, most will not have dress shoes on, and kids might be in shorts. Most men will probably have on some khakis and a dress shirt. The bride and groom's dad may have on a suit. If I had to give you a dress code then it's "cocktail" at most. Women tend to wear cocktail attire. The reason your date isn't helping is because he/she doesn't know because the wedding couple doesn't tell people a dress code because it's considered rude.. It's almost like saying "I don't trust you to dress well enough for my wedding, so here is what you're going to wear so you don't embarrass me".

If the wedding is outside of Greece in the USA, then there will typically be a dress code on the card... I'd wear a suit and tie.

I won't talk to other countries because I don't know wedding dress codes there.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mj_toronto8

mj_toronto8

Member
I suggest cocktail attire as well...but it all depends on if you prefer to be overdressed or underdressed. You can play it safe and overdress (suit and tie) or if you don't mind, you could also wear a dress shirt, slacks, and dress shoes. The time of the wedding and location may also give you a hint to how formal or informal it is. If the wedding is outside it will definitely be more casual.
 

k_tsoukalas

Moderator
I would wear cocktail attire, as well. It is much better to be overdressed than underdressed, as people perceive dressing well as a sign of respect. I'd rather be the only dressed up one in the room than the only casually dressed one. So, when I have no idea what to ear to a wedding, I default to wearing a standard cocktail dress, no matter the situation (unless the dress code is specified on the invitation - it often is). So, double check the invitation and if the dress code isn't on it, my vote is cocktail attire.
 

Do any of you have questions about Greek?

Do any of you have questions about Greek - speaking, reading, writing, listening, grammar, pronunciation, etc? I know some of you are learning online, and being able to ask specific questions isn't something you can always do. Greek can be confusing because words have multiple meaning - e.g. the word apo (από) has at least 5-10 different meanings - and the order of the words in a sentence can in any order you want. If you have any thing that might be confusing to you or you need some clarification on please ask away and I'll do my best to answer your questions.

Do you know these famous Greeks?

This is a really fun game to test your Greek knowledge. Do you know all of these politicians and celebrities? I could only name a few.

Check out this basic Greek etiquette video

I'm not sure if I agree with all the points that have been made in the video, but I do think that Greeks have a very specific culture and etiquette amongst themselves that is not really known to outsiders. I've been to Greece a few times, and my understanding of the culture is pretty good. What I have noticed is that Greeks can be extremely hospitable, but I have happened upon some rude people as well. For the most part, it really depends on the person.

The duties of a Greek Godparent

Godparents play an extremely important role in the God child's life. They are supposed to be their spiritual guide, and care for the child, similar to an aunt or an uncle. Customarily, a Godparent is also supposed to care for the child if anything happens to the parents. They provide gifts for the child on spiritual holidays, birthdays, and name days, and are present for important milestones. Although, not every Godparent is very engaging, and over the years some people lose touch with the families.

The rise of historical Anatolian cuisine in Greece

Over the past few years, I've noticed more and more trendy Anatolian restaurants opening up. These restaurants feature historical food cooked by Greeks whose ancestors used to live in modern day Turkey. The cuisine is very similar to Greek food, but has a few twist such as the use of red pepper powder or paste from Aleppo. Some classic dishes include Smyrneika soutzoukakia and kebab. It's really nice to see that these Greek traditions are being revived for the modern Greeks to enjoy.
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

WorldwideGreeks.com is a free online forum community where people can discuss Greek food, travel, traditions, history and mythology. Join WorldwideGreeks.com here!

JOIN COMMUNITY FOR FREE

LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT
Follow WorldwideGreeks.com:
Facebook Instagram Twitter
Top