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francescool

Active member
As many of you may know, the average price of a gyro has been increasing slightly over the last few years. I haven't been to Greece in quite some time, so I'm wondering what the average price is these days. Does it vary from island to island and place to place? Or is it pretty stable? A gyro is my staple food in Greece, so I'll be eating very many throughout my next trip. Thanks everyone!
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
€2.50 before the high inflation. The government just increased prices to €4.50 back in March if I recall correctly.
 
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nm1999

Active member
€2.50 before the high inflation. The government just increased prices to €4.50 back in March if I recall correctly.
Woah that's pretty pricey for Greece but personally, I can afford it. Much cheaper than a low cost meal in many places around the world. I imagine that many locals struggle to afford it though. What a shame.
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
Woah that's pretty pricey for Greece but personally, I can afford it. Much cheaper than a low cost meal in many places around the world. I imagine that many locals struggle to afford it though. What a shame.
It's very expensive given that the average Greek makes €600, euros a month and the cost of living (ignoring housing) is about the same as the USA.
 
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cubrinj

Active member
It's very expensive given that the average Greek makes €600, euros a month and the cost of living (ignoring housing) is about the same as the USA.
Yes, Greek people can't keep up with the prices
 

k_tsoukalas

Administrator
The last time I went to Greece was a few years ago and I recall it cost maybe 3 Euro? I bet they're more now!
 

How did you all learn how to cook Greek food?

For all of you who know a lot about Greek cuisine, how did you learn?

For me, I learned from a combination of my family, with recipes handed down, and from cookbooks to fill in the gaps.

My yiayia was straight from Greece and she taught me everything she knew. She didn't really teach me on purpose, I just cooked with her a lot.

When she passed, I realized that the recipes were all in my head, and if I neglected to learn something from her, the rest of the family somehow didn't know either. So I had to find some good cookbooks to help.

How about you guys?

Favorite Greek healthy foods

The first month of the new year is over and I still don't feel like I have a handle on healthy eating. It was one of my goals for the year! I eat far too much junk and when I sit down for a meal, it's a little more decadent than it should be for me to lose the ten pounds I gained since last summer.

I thought I'd make a list of some of my favorite Greek foods I plan to eat to slim things down a bit.

Greek Salad

Starting with the basics, a Greek salad is a combination of sliced tomatoes, sliced cucumbers, green bell peppers, red onion, olives, and feta cheese, typically seasoned with salt and oregano and dressed with olive oil. It’s a dish packed with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidant-rich vegetables.

Horta and Hortopita

Hortopita, or wild greens pie, is a savory dish filled with a variety of nutritious greens like spinach, kale, chard, and dandelion greens. I can dial back on the cheese to make it healthier.

I also love Horta, or boiled greens. maybe I can steam it instead of boil and then use less olive oil than I normally would have.

Souvlaki

Traditionally served in pita bread with tzatziki, souvlaki can be made with chicken, pork, or lamb skewers, and they’re often grilled. High in protein and light on carbs, it’s perfect for a post-workout meal. As far as meat dishes goes, this one is on the lighter side and I can primarily choose chicken to trim things down a bit.

What are your favorite Greek olives?

I love Kalamata olives but I am trying to branch out to different ones. Which Greek olives do you like best? I did some research about the different types:

Kalamata Olives: Perhaps the most renowned Greek olives, Kalamatas, are recognized by their dark purple color and almond shape. They are often preserved in wine vinegar or olive oil, which further accentuates their rich and fruity flavor.

Halkidiki Olives: These are large, pale green olives from the Halkidiki region of Northern Greece. Known for their crisp flesh and slightly peppery taste, Halkidiki olives are commonly stuffed with various fillings, from feta cheese to almonds, making them a good choice for appetizers.

Amfissa Olives: Cultivated primarily in Central Greece, near the ancient oracle of Delphi, Amfissa olives can range in color from green to black, depending on their ripeness. They have a mild, slightly sweet flavor and a meaty texture.

Throumba Olives: Unique to the island of Thassos, these olives are naturally sun-dried on the tree. They have a wrinkled appearance and a savory taste with a hint of vinegar, due to their natural fermentation.

I have never had any of these olives other than Kalamata and I am sure there are others, too.

greek-olives.jpg

Does this look like a good koliva recipe?

I am planning a memorial service coming up in about two weeks. The person who makes the koliva for everyone in the church is going to be out of town, and I can't find another person to do it. So I thought I'd make it.

I found this recipe - does it look like it would work?

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups whole wheat berries
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1/4 cup sesame seeds
  • 1/4 cup chopped almonds
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins
  • 1/4 cup black raisins
  • 2 tbsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp ground cloves
  • Garnish: pomegranate seeds, whole almonds, and powdered sugar

Instructions:

  1. Preparing the Wheat:
  • Rinse the wheat berries thoroughly in a strainer under cold running water.
  • Place the wheat in a large pot and add water until it's about 2 inches above the wheat level.
  • Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for about 2 hours, or until they are tender but not mushy, adding more water as necessary.
  • Drain the wheat and spread it out on a towel or a large baking tray to dry out completely, preferably overnight.
  1. Toasting Ingredients:
  • Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C).
  • Spread the sesame seeds on a baking sheet and toast in the oven for about 5-8 minutes, till golden; be vigilant as they can burn quickly.
  • Repeat this process with the almonds and the walnuts, ensuring each is nicely toasted but not burnt.
  1. Mixing the Koliva:
  • Once the wheat is dry, combine it in a large bowl with powdered sugar, toasted walnuts, toasted sesame seeds, toasted almonds, golden and black raisins, cinnamon, and cloves.
  • Stir the mixture gently to combine.
  1. Assembling the Dish:
  • Mound the mixture onto a large serving platter, shaping it into a dome with your hands or a spoon.
  • Decorate the top with whole almonds and pomegranate seeds creating a cross or other religious symbols as is traditional.
  • Just before serving, sift powdered sugar over the top to cover.

Cooking Greek Style Octopus

One of the things I like about Greek cuisine is the octopus! It's so tender and flavorful. I get it a lot when I am in Greece and only a few times in the United States. I want to learn how to do that. In particular I want to know:
  • Choosing the Right Octopus: What should I look for when buying octopus? Are there any specific types or sizes that work best?
  • Tenderizing Process: I’ve heard that tenderizing the octopus is crucial. What methods do you recommend? I’ve heard of everything from beating it to simmering it in a pot. What works best?
  • Cooking Techniques: Should I grill it, bake it, or cook it in a stew? I'm aiming for something that's traditionally Greek.
  • Marination and Seasonings: What are the best herbs, spices, or marination techniques to use? I know olive oil and lemon are staples, but are there any other must-have seasonings?
Any advice you can give is welcome!
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