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seleanor

Active member
This is something I always wondered... how were Greek myths preserved and kept the same through so many years? I wonder if the myths were changed over the years and if they actually have remained the same as they were when they first created in Ancient Times.
 

k_tsoukalas

Administrator
On some level, they were handed down through the generations through oral storytelling. Other than that, we have a few surviving works written by the ancients, such as the works of Homer, who write the Iliad and the Odyssey.
 

Raymond Gorgone

New member
In order to truly understand how ancient myth was transmitted through the ages, I believe we need to first understand the true origins of myth. I've dedicated many years researching a novel approach to developing such an understanding. Check out my three-part video presentation at geographicalimagesofthegods.org and let me know if it helps answer your questions.
 
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seleanor

Active member
In order to truly understand how ancient myth was transmitted through the ages, I believe we need to first understand the true origins of myth. I've dedicated many years researching a novel approach to developing such an understanding. Check out my three-part video presentation at geographicalimagesofthegods.org and let me know if it helps answer your questions.
Great research, thanks for sharing!
 

amygdalE

Active member
This is something I always wondered... how were Greek myths preserved and kept the same through so many years? I wonder if the myths were changed over the years and if they actually have remained the same as they were when they first created in Ancient Times.
You have a valid question; however, there is a fact that must be considered about the ancient Greek myths. My view: Most of them are not the historically original myths. After a myth was created and became known to others, some other Greeks -- in different places and/or times -- modified them or elaborated them or combined some with other myths: they were not statically maintained or transmitted. A pristine/original myth involved the PERSONIFICATION of some natural or historical event, wherefore all myths are anthropomorphic rather than accounts and explanations of natural events [which we call scientific accounts]. Ouranos was the visible sky as well as the sky-god, with superhuman knowledge, will, etc. All myths are imaginative/invented accounts. They reach the height of Hesiod's Theogony (the Geneology of the gods). // The Hebrew Bible is basically a Geneology of Man, an *Anthropogony, which starts with two different myths of the creation of humans: the Elohim [=the Gods, the two supreme Gods, one male and the other female] in Genesis-1 and Yahweh in Genesis-2 -- both euphemistically translated into Greek as "Theos", which eventually made all Christians monotheists and enemies of mythological traditions. [........]
 
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Favorite Stories of Greek Mythology

I am studying up on some Greek Mythology. I am making a list of key stories to look into and get to know. Can you think of anything I may have missed:

- Prometheus gives mankind fire
- Anything related to the Minotaur
- I plan to read the Iliad and the Odyssey
- How medusa turned into a monster
- Zeus's various "Exploits"
- Anything related to Hercules
- Information about the Olympian gods and goddesses
- The war with the Titans

Hestia Greek Goddess Information

We don't talk about Hestia much... but I just remembered that my yiayia did! I wondered why, so I researched her. Here is what I found... I think it has something to do with the fact that she was a housewife and she loved her family.. Looking at what she represents, it kind of makes sense. Here's what I found about her:

The Greek goddess Hestia was revered as the goddess of the hearth and home. In ancient Greek mythology, she was known to be a benevolent deity, who brought warmth and comfort to the home. Through her presence, she blessed the family and provided them with a sense of safety and security.

Hestia was the first-born child of Cronus and Rhea, and she was the sister of other Olympian gods such as Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades. Unlike her brothers and sisters, she did not engage in any power struggles or battles. She preferred to remain neutral and instead focused her attention on her household duties. Hestia was considered one of the most important deities, as the hearth represented the heart of the home. People would light a fire in her honor and worship her by placing offerings of food and drink on their hearth.

In ancient Greek culture, a hearth was often considered the most important part of the home. It was where food was cooked, and family members gathered to eat, share stories, and bond. Hestia's role in domestic life was crucial, and she was responsible for creating the warmth and sense of security felt within the home. Her presence was believed to bring good luck and happiness to the family.

Important Places of Greek Mythology?

I was just thinking about the Greek mythos and legends and how in some of them, location appears to be important.

For example, Mount Olympus is a real mountain in Greece. The Archeron River, one of the five rivers of Hades, really exists. The story of the Minotaur has a backdrop of the Knossos Palace (I think). There was the Oracle of Delphi in the stories, and Delphi really exists.

Can you think of anything else? I find this stuff interesting.

Aphrodite - Greek Goddess of Love

Ahead of Valentine's Day, I thought I'd share some things that I thought were interesting about Aphrodite, the Greek Goddess of love:

1. Aphrodite Was Born from Sea Foam.
In Greek mythology, it's said that Aphrodite was born from the sea foam that formed when Cronus cut off Uranus's genitals and threw them into the ocean. As the spirit of desire and physical attraction, Aphrodite's birth story reflects the power of nature and the irresistible force of passion.

2. She Was Married to Hephaestus.
Despite her reputation as the goddess of love and beauty, Aphrodite had a less-than-romantic marriage with Hephaestus, the god of blacksmiths and volcanoes. Hephaestus was unattractive and had a limp, and Aphrodite had several affairs with other gods and mortals. To me, this seem like an unlikely match.

3. She Possessed a Magic Girdle.
To make herself even more desirable and seductive, Aphrodite had a magic girdle that could make anyone fall in love with her. It's said that she used this girdle to win the hearts of both gods and mortals and cause conflicts and jealousy among them.

4. She Had Children with Several Gods and Mortals.
Aphrodite was famous for her many love affairs, and she had children with several gods and mortals. Her most famous son was Eros, the god of love and passion, who was sometimes depicted as her lover as well.

5. She Was Worshiped throughout Ancient Greece.
As the goddess of love and beauty, Aphrodite was a popular deity throughout ancient Greece and was worshiped in many cities and temples. She was also associated with fertility, sexuality, and even war, as seen in her role as a protector of soldiers and sailor.

6. Her Symbols Included Doves, Roses, and Mirrors.
Like most deities, Aphrodite had several symbols that represented her qualities and powers. Her most common symbols were doves, roses, and mirrors, which reflected her beauty, love, and vanity.

Hestia - A forgotton goddess?

I don't know much about Hestia and I want to learn. My grandmother used to talk about her all the time- I don't know why!

I looked her up in Theoi.com:

HESTIA was the virgin goddess of the hearth (both private and municipal) and the home. As the goddess of the family hearth she also presided over the cooking of bread and the preparation of the family meal.

My grandmother loved to cook. Is this probably why my grandmother would reference this goddess?
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