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cubrinj

Active member
I want to start researching the Greek War for Independence - since Greek Independence Day is celebrated on March 25th of every year. I know that this is when we celebrate Greece's freedom from the Ottoman Empire. However, I recently learned that March 25th is actually when the war began for most of Greece, and in Mani I know it started maybe about a week earlier... This isn't what I originally thought, and it means that I don't really know much about it.

So, these are the topics I want to learn about - feel free to chime in with others I can research:
  • How did Greece come under Ottoman control in the first place?
  • How did the War for Independence really start?
  • Who are some of the main players for this war?
  • Are there some battles, etc that I should look up?
 
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I think this could help!
 
I want to start researching the Greek War for Independence - since Greek Independence Day is celebrated on March 25th of every year. I know that this is when we celebrate Greece's freedom from the Ottoman Empire. However, I recently learned that March 25th is actually when the war began for most of Greece, and in Mani I know it started maybe about a week earlier... This isn't what I originally thought, and it means that I don't really know much about it.

So, these are the topics I want to learn about - feel free to chime in with others I can research:
  • How did Greece come under Ottoman control in the first place?
  • How did the War for Independence really start?
  • Who are some of the main players for this war?
  • Are there some battles, etc that I should look up?

Although Greek Independence Day was this past weekend, technically the 25th of March marked the beginning of the war. So there is still time to research. That is one thing that I really think is interesting - why commemorate on the 25th? Usually, we commemorate an event like this on the day when independence was achieved.
 
Thank you, everyone, for chiming in! I spend some time researching some of these topics and feel that I really understand the events surrounding Greek Independence Day. I wore blue on March 25th in honor of this event in history.
 

Learning about the Spartan way of life

I find the Spartans fascinating. They seemed to have a different way of life!

The Spartans, known for their military might, also led a lifestyle that was remarkably disciplined and focused on simplicity.

The core of Spartan society was its military-oriented ethos. From a young age, Spartan boys were trained to be soldiers in the agoge, a rigorous education system that emphasized physical training, endurance, and survival skills. This preparation was not just about warfare but about creating individuals who were resilient, self-sufficient, and disciplined.

But Spartan discipline extended beyond the military sphere. Spartans lived a life of austerity and frugality that is quite alien to our modern way of living. Meals were simple, homes were unadorned, and luxuries were frowned upon. This was not out of a lack of resources but a deliberate choice to avoid softness and dependency on material comforts.

Interestingly, this Spartan simplicity also fostered a sense of equality among citizens. By eschewing luxury, Spartans aimed to reduce divisions within their society. Wealth and status were downplayed, while military prowess and moral integrity were valued above all.

What do you guys think about this or what can you add to my thinking?

Story of the Birth of Democracy

I just watched a nice documentary about the birth of democracy in Athens. This is so fascinating! I didn't realize the nuances, only the basics about how it began in Athens. This documentary goes into a lot more detail.

Documentary about Ancient Greece

I love to watch documentaries about Ancient Greece. I find a lot of content on YouTube but some of it was just created by users and I am not sure the credibility of the sources.

I watched this one recently and wanted to share - it is from the History Channel:

Studying the Trojan War - Was it Real?

Did the Trojan War really happen? I am doing a bit of research and wanted to know what you guys thought:

The war is believed to have happened around 1200 BCE, and while there is no concrete evidence to support its occurrence, it is widely accepted as factual.

What is confusing me is how prevalent it is in Greek Mythology. In addition to the gods' involvement in the conflict, various stories and legends were added over time to give the tale more depth and drama. For example, the character of Achilles was said to be invulnerable except for his heel, which led to the phrase "Achilles heel" being used to describe a person's one weakness.

While some scholars once dismissed the Trojan War as pure myth, modern archaeological evidence has suggested that it may have been a real event. Excavations at the ancient site of Troy have revealed evidence of a long period of conflict and destruction, and historians have found similarities between the tale as it is told in ancient texts and what is known about the region's history at the time. While many details of the Trojan War are still shrouded in mystery, it seems increasingly likely that it was not just a legend but a real event that has been passed down through the ages.

Athens and the creation of democracy

I've been thinking about Athens and how it's the birth of democracy. I wondered if other societies had experimented with the concepts or if Athens was unique? Does anyone know? I know that there's been some evidence that other societies experimented with community leadership, but none had a true democracy like what Athens developed.

It was unique in developing a system where a significant portion of its inhabitants could participate directly in decision-making processes. This early form of democracy was largely initiated under the leadership of Cleisthenes in 508/507 BC. His reforms reorganized the population into ten tribes based on their residence rather than lineage, promoting a broader and more inclusive political engagement.

In this Athenian democracy, citizens had the right to attend the Assembly (Ekklesia), where they could speak and vote on legislation and executive decisions. The Council of Five Hundred (Boule), selected by lot for each of the ten tribes, proposed legislation and handled daily affairs. This lottery system for public office sought to prevent power monopolies and encourage civic participation.

I know that this work truly influenced other democratic governments through the world!

Feel free to chime in with your thoughts- I find this stuff interesting.
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