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voula_slat

Active member
Named because it looks like a log of salami, this is actually an easy and decadent dessert. It’s also called Kormos, I think. These are the ingredients I use:
  • 3 cups crumbled chocolate graham crackers
  • 2 T Cognac
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, melted
  • Vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup Unsweetened Cocoa powder
  • 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
In a bowl, add the crackers and sprinkle with cognac. Mix the rest of the ingredients to another bowl until combined. Fold in the crackers with a rubber spatula. Spread the mixture over wax paper and shape into a log. Put in freezer for 3 hours. Slice and serve.
 
Named because it looks like a log of salami, this is actually an easy and decadent dessert. It’s also called Kormos, I think. These are the ingredients I use:
  • 3 cups crumbled chocolate graham crackers
  • 2 T Cognac
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, melted
  • Vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup Unsweetened Cocoa powder
  • 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
In a bowl, add the crackers and sprinkle with cognac. Mix the rest of the ingredients to another bowl until combined. Fold in the crackers with a rubber spatula. Spread the mixture over wax paper and shape into a log. Put in freezer for 3 hours. Slice and serve.
Translation for kormos is tree trunk. I have made this with British tea crackers and it turned out good. The first time I had it was in a small town (Kymini) outside of Thessaloniki.
Here is my recipe: 1/2c sugar, 4TBS coca, 1/2 c coffee, butter, heat on low to melt butter. Add vanilla. Add chopped walnuts to biscuits, pour sauce over biscuits and nut mixture. roll in saran wrap and place in freezer wrapped in foil. Some people roll in coconut flakes or crushed nuts.
 
Translation for kormos is tree trunk. I have made this with British tea crackers and it turned out good. The first time I had it was in a small town (Kymini) outside of Thessaloniki.
Here is my recipe: 1/2c sugar, 4TBS coca, 1/2 c coffee, butter, heat on low to melt butter. Add vanilla. Add chopped walnuts to biscuits, pour sauce over biscuits and nut mixture. roll in saran wrap and place in freezer wrapped in foil. Some people roll in coconut flakes or crushed nuts.
I have never made it, but I plan to make it soon. Maybe I would use something like vanilla wafter cookies for this? I imagine they need to be crunchy. Thank you, both, for sharing you recipes! I never would have thought to add coffee, and I also had no idea Kokomos meant tree trunk.
 
Vanilla wafer cookies work wonderfully. It is more traditional to make it with these cookies. With that being said you can add anything to a good kormo recipe and give it your own twist.
 
Thank you for all the tips! I plan to use vanilla wafer cookies next time - seems like the easiest option and I wasn't quite happy with the chocolate grahams. Thank you!
 

Popular Greek Foods to Serve at Weddings?

I am involved with planning a wedding where much of the cooking is going to be done by family, just like it is in Greece.

What are the popular and most common foods to serve at weddings in Greece? In that family many of them had been born in Greece so I am curious about what to expect.

Many of them haven't told me what they are cooking and I want to make sure there's enough food. All they basically say is, "We are making typical wedding foods like you'll find in Greece."

Menu - Advice on What to Serve at a Greek Dinner Party

I'm planning to host a Greek-themed dinner party and could use some advice on what dishes to serve. I want to create an authentic experience for my guests and ensure they get a true taste of Greek cuisine.

Here are a few ideas I have in mind:
  • Tzatziki
  • Dolmades
  • Spanakopita
  • Souvlaki
  • Greek Salad
  • Lemon Potatoes
Should I add or subtract anything?

What is different about Greek cuisine in the US?

I am a Greek American living in the Boston area, and I have also been to Greece a lot.

I have noticed that there are some differences between here and Greece in terms of cuisine. I can't put my finger on it, but I know that things are just different.

Does anyone have any insights as to why? I feel like a large part is the freshness of all the ingredients. But I think the recipes are different, too.

Any advice on how I can recreate some of that magic here?

Tips on How to Make Greek Olive Bread

I'm a big fan of Mediterranean cuisine and lately, I've been craving some authentic Greek olive bread. I've tried a couple of recipes, but I still feel there's something missing to make it just right.

Does anyone have any tried-and-true tips or secret ingredients that can elevate my Greek olive bread? I'm especially interested in:
  • Types of olives that work best
  • Tips for getting the perfect crust
  • Any herbs or spices that add authentic flavor
  • Baking techniques that ensure a soft, flavorful inside
Looking forward to hearing your suggestions! Thanks in advance for your help.

Chocolate Koulourakia Recipe

I had Chocolate Koulourakia when in Greece and I recently found and tried the recipe. It was good! Thought I'd share:

Ingredients:​

  • 1 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon milk (if needed)
  • 1 egg yolk + 1 tablespoon water (for egg wash)
  • Sesame seeds (optional)

Instructions:​

  1. Preheat Oven: Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C). Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. Cream Butter and Sugar: In a large bowl, beat the softened butter and granulated sugar together until light and fluffy, about 3-4 minutes.
  3. Add Eggs and Vanilla: Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Mix in the vanilla extract.
  4. Combine Dry Ingredients: In a separate bowl, sift together the cocoa powder, baking powder, flour, and salt.
  5. Mix Dry and Wet Ingredients: Gradually add the dry ingredients to the butter mixture, mixing until a dough forms. If the dough is too dry, add a tablespoon of milk to help bring it together.
  6. Shape the Cookies: Take small pieces of dough and roll them into ropes about 4-5 inches long. Fold each rope in half and twist the ends together to form a twist shape, or shape them into rings if you prefer.
  7. Egg Wash: In a small bowl, beat the egg yolk with 1 tablespoon of water. Brush the tops of the cookies with the egg wash. Sprinkle with sesame seeds if desired.
  8. Bake: Place the cookies on the prepared baking sheets. Bake in the preheated oven for 15-18 minutes, or until the cookies are firm and slightly golden around the edges.
  9. Cool and Serve: Allow the cookies to cool on the baking sheets for a few minutes before transferring them to a wire rack to cool completely.
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