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I am trying to recreate some family recipes and now I am working on pastitsio. My family used to make it with this large macaroni noodles. I finally tracked them down at a Greek store so that's all set. I have the flavors just about right in the pastitsio. I can't seem to get the top crema right. Sometimes it's too thin. Sometimes it won't get fluffy. Sometimes it's kind of gooey. I had one batch that was lump (I figured out why this was happening though, I wasn't stirring it enough and the heat was too high).

How do you guys make this part? My test pastitsio has been in 9 x 13 pans so you can get an idea for proportions.
 

Dluciani4

New member
I am trying to recreate some family recipes and now I am working on pastitsio. My family used to make it with this large macaroni noodles. I finally tracked them down at a Greek store so that's all set. I have the flavors just about right in the pastitsio. I can't seem to get the top crema right. Sometimes it's too thin. Sometimes it won't get fluffy. Sometimes it's kind of gooey. I had one batch that was lump (I figured out why this was happening though, I wasn't stirring it enough and the heat was too high).

How do you guys make this part? My test pastitsio has been in 9 x 13 pans so you can get an idea for proportions.
The butter and flour mixture has to be equal parts the. Slowly add the milk. I would say 1 1/2 tbls of butter and flour and one cup of milk. Hope this helps
 
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Steff

New member
I am trying to find a good website that offers authentic Greek items to ship to the US- any ideas?
 
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Luana

New member
My aunt used to use Creamette Elbow Macaroni, which you can find at any grocery store, and her pastitsio was delicious. The type of pasta really does not matter, at least that's my thought. It's how the meat sauce is seasoned and the creama that make pastitsio stand out. You can add two beaten eggs to the creama which will make it more like a custard and should make it puff.

Combine flour and butter well, so no lumps are present. Slowly add warm milk and keep mixing until all liquid is incorporated. Remove from head and add beaten eggs, but be sure it's mixture is not too hot when adding eggs. Keep mixing, return to heat for a bit when all is incorporated.
 

k_tsoukalas

Moderator
The Krema was a hard thing for me to get right, as well. The old recipe as it was written was very hard for me to follow - plus I think flour these days might be different than it was even twenty years ago. I don't know why! So, I tend to follow a traditional "white sauce" method of putting the flour and butter together in the saucepan (I think this is called the roux) and then I add the eggs. Learning the technique made things a lot easier.
 

paharo45

Active member
I am just starting to learn how to make pastitsio and I found this thread to be very helpful. Hopefully, the whole dish comes together well.
 
Thank you guys, I have tried a bunch of different things and I don't know what I am still doing wrong. It has gotten better, but the texture is still a little bit off. Maybe I am adding too much flour?
 

Favorite Vegan Greek Foods for Lent?

Lent is around the corner and this year, I thought I would go all in and stick with Vegan foods during lent. I thought I would gather ideas from you guys, and I will share a few of my own.

- My family used to make a yellow split pea soup that was very simple. I will track down how to make it and get the recipe from someone.
- Foods like lentils, hummus, fava beans are great - any recommendations? I could always make lentil soup, beans in tomato sauce...
- Vegetables in tomato sauce - have seen lent versions with no oil, potatoes, legumes, veggies... any ideas? Looks like I can use nearly anything.

Thanks for chiming in!

Help with judging rice amounts in pilafi

My friend makes a great chicken pilafi and towards the end, she adds orzo or rice. She uses 1 whole, cute up chicken with the bone in, and cooks it in a mixture of herbs, spices, and tomato paste. Then she said, "look at at the liquid to determine how much rice or orzo to put, then measure it in a coffee cup." The explanation of how to know how much rice to put took a few minutes and I thought I understood, but then I went home and tried the recipe and something wasn't right. I clearly added too much. I am trying to piece together 1. what I did wrong and 2. how should I have gauged it in the first place?

Quick Greek Dinner Ideas

Many of the Greek dishes I know how to cook are very time consuming for me to put together, like stuffed grape leaves and spanakopita.

Sometimes, I want to eat Greek food, but I don't want to spend a lot of time in the kitchen. Can you think of some easy Greek suppers besides salads to eat? I cook village salad and cabbage salad, but am also open for suggestions for different salads. I know I could always serve souvlaki with them. I know that is fairly quick, aside from the marinating.

Can someone help me make fasolakia?

I recently had a mishap while making fasolakia. The beans all fell apart. I am assuming I overcooked the beans but I am not sure because I have cooked the dish this long in the past without issues.

What was different about this time is I decided to put potatoes in it to make it a bit heartier for winter. Should I have not done this? Maybe I really cooked it longer than I thought because of the potatoes?

Cooking with Greek Saffron

A friend brought me back some saffron from Greece!

For the life of me, I don't actually remember seeing any Greek recipes with saffron. I want to use it authentically if possible.

Are there any ways of using it that are authentically Greek?
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