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dpappas87

Active member
I am getting ready to make stifado. I found these great fresh, small onions at the store and I knew that is what I had to do with them!

I am trying to figure out which meat to use. Could I use anything? Beef is expensive, I never really liked lamb in it... I was thinking maybe pork? Or should I just suck it up and use beef?

I have had it in Greece with rabbit but can't really find rabbit to eat here in the US.
 
Yes you can absolutely use pork. They make stifado with wild boar in Greece all the time. Let us k is how it came out
 
I am getting ready to make stifado. I found these great fresh, small onions at the store and I knew that is what I had to do with them!

I am trying to figure out which meat to use. Could I use anything? Beef is expensive, I never really liked lamb in it... I was thinking maybe pork? Or should I just suck it up and use beef?

I have had it in Greece with rabbit but can't really find rabbit to eat here in the US.
Yes, you can use any sturdy meat. I have done it with pork, it tastes great! It's about the method and not necessarily the meat itself, and I find I like it with any meat, rabbit included. I have never tried to make it with chicken, though.
 

What is the best street food in Greece?

What do you consider the best street food in Greece? Are there any specific dishes or local delicacies that you dream of having again? Also, if you have recommendations for particular places or vendors, that would be fantastic!

Here's what I've got on my list so far:
  • Souvlaki
  • Gyros
  • Loukoumades
  • Spanakopita
  • Bougatsa
But I'd like to go beyond the usual and try the real local flavors that might not be as famous internationally. I'm open to suggestions from all over Greece. I have an idea of what I like but want to see what others say.

Greek Halva Recipe to Enjoy During Lent?

I love Halva year round but I often see it a lot during Lent. My recipe doesn't seem Lent friendly to me. Any ideas on how I can adapt it?

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup semolina
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup chopped almonds or walnuts (optional)
  • 1/4 cup raisins (optional)
Instructions:
  1. In a medium-sized saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat.
  2. Add the semolina to the melted butter and stir continuously for about 5-7 minutes, or until the semolina turns golden brown and begins to emit a nutty aroma.
  3. While stirring the semolina mixture, gradually add the sugar and continue to cook for another 2-3 minutes until the sugar is fully incorporated.
  4. Slowly pour in the water, stirring constantly to avoid lumps from forming. Be careful as the mixture may splatter.
  5. Reduce the heat to low and continue stirring the mixture until it thickens to a porridge-like consistency, about 5-7 minutes.
  6. Stir in the ground cinnamon and optional chopped nuts and raisins, if using.
  7. Remove the saucepan from the heat and let the halva rest for a few minutes to thicken further.
  8. Serve the halva warm or at room temperature, either as a dessert or a sweet breakfast treat.

Getting souvlaki tender?

How do you make tender Greek souvlaki? I've attempted various recipes, marinated for different durations, and experimented with both high and low cooking temps, but I seem to be missing the mark for that mouth-watering tenderness commonly found in authentic Greek souvlaki.

Has anyone found a particular method or ingredient that makes a significant difference in achieving that ideal tenderness?

I use ladolemono, a marinate it overnight in ziplock baggies (after I cut the meat in cubes) and then I add them to the skewers and cook them on the grill. I typically use chicken.

What are the most famous Greek cheeses?

I've recently embarked on a culinary quest to explore the rich and diverse world of Greek cheeses. From the tangy feta found in traditional Greek salads to the sizzling delights of halloumi, Greece's cheese culture seems incredibly vast and flavorful. 🇬🇷

I'm reaching out to this knowledgeable community to ask: What are the most famous Greek cheeses that you've tried or heard of?

Are there any particular varieties that are a must-try or any hidden gems that rarely escape the borders of Greece? And if you have any delicious recipes or pairings to share, I'd love to hear about those too!

How does this fasolada recipe look?

Does anyone have any idea if the ingredients list in this fasolada recipe looks good? I want to make it soon - seems like a good lenten meal to me.

  • 1 cup dried white beans (such as Great Northern or navy beans), soaked overnight
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots, diced
  • 2 celery stalks, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 can (14 oz) diced tomatoes
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Chopped fresh parsley for garnish
  • Optional: lemon wedges for serving

I am questioning the lemon and the garlic - I never put both lemon and garlic together. Also, I have never used stock before, I usually put tomato paste in it. But this recipe has diced tomatoes so I am questioning if the stock is necessary.
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