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dimi_pat

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I have gotten into studying Greek Mythology. So far, I have looked into the story of Icarus and the War of the Titans. Does anyone have any advice for stories I should check out? On my list also is to read the Iliad and the Odyssey. I tend to like stories of adventure - the Icarus tale I found to be sad... but I would read anything.

I remember in school I had to read a book about Greek Mythology - I forget the name of it - but it had a bunch of stories in it.
 
I have gotten into studying Greek Mythology. So far, I have looked into the story of Icarus and the War of the Titans. Does anyone have any advice for stories I should check out? On my list also is to read the Iliad and the Odyssey. I tend to like stories of adventure - the Icarus tale I found to be sad... but I would read anything.

I remember in school I had to read a book about Greek Mythology - I forget the name of it - but it had a bunch of stories in it.
When you read the Iliad, the Odyssey or any other book, can you tell what is myth and what is fact? Now that you are at it, should read also the Hebrew Bible, or. to stay within Greek matters, the Gospels, which were composed in [not translated into] Greek.
 
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I figured out the name of the book I was thinking of! It was by Edith Hamilton - Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes.
 
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I figured out the name of the book I was thinking of! It was by Edith Hamilton - Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes.
That's a good one! It's a good start for learning - but most stories require a deeper dive.
 

Learning About Dionysius

I have recently been studying about Dionysius. I feel like I hav been forgetting about him! Beyond the basics that he is the Greek god of wine, festivity, and ecstatic celebration, I’m eager to peel back the layers and understand his role and significance across different cultures and historical epochs.

What piqued my interest initially was how Dionysius seems to embody a dual nature – both bringing joy and chaos. This duality, along with his followers, rituals, and the influence on arts and culture, presents a fascinating study. I am particularly interested in the Dionysian festivals!

Curious to hear people's thoughts...

12 Olympian Gods and Goddesses

I love mythology and I thought I'd make list of the 12 Olympian Gods and Goddesses. This is my best guess. Do you know that I have seen different versions of this? What do you think?
  1. Zeus: The king of the gods, ruler of the sky and thunder, and the god of law, order, and justice.
  2. Hera: The queen of the gods, Zeus's wife and sister, and the goddess of marriage and childbirth.
  3. Poseidon: The god of the sea, earthquakes, and horses, often depicted with a trident.
  4. Demeter: The goddess of agriculture, fertility, and the harvest, responsible for the cycle of life and death in crops.
  5. Athena: The goddess of wisdom, warfare, strategy, and crafts, often associated with strategic warfare and civilization.
  6. Apollo: The god of music, poetry, prophecy, healing, and archery, known for his wisdom and beauty.
  7. Artemis: The goddess of the hunt, wilderness, childbirth, and virginity, often depicted with a bow and arrows.
  8. Ares: The god of war, violence, and bloodshed, embodying the brutal aspects of conflict.
  9. Aphrodite: The goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation, born from the sea foam and known for her irresistible charm.
  10. Hephaestus: The god of fire, blacksmiths, craftsmen, and volcanoes, renowned for his skill in metalworking.
  11. Hermes: The messenger of the gods, associated with travel, commerce, communication, and trickery.
  12. Dionysus: The god of wine, fertility, ecstasy, and theatre, representing the joyous aspects of life and celebration.
greek-gods.jpg

Was the Trojan War real?

I have been wondering, was the Trojan War real? I decided to explore the topic. I still don't know. What do you guys think?

Let's start with the basics. According to ancient Greek mythology, the Trojan War was fought between the Greeks and the Trojans over Helen of Troy. Helen, the wife of King Menelaus, was said to be the most beautiful woman in the world. When she was kidnapped by Paris of Troy, her husband called upon the Greek army to help him get her back. The war lasted ten years, according to the myth, and ended with the Greeks claiming victory when they used a wooden horse to get inside the walls of Troy.

It's easy to dismiss this story as nothing more than a legend, but there is some archaeological evidence that suggests that there may be some truth to the tale. In the 1870s, a German businessman named Heinrich Schliemann claimed to have found the site of ancient Troy in modern-day Turkey. He found evidence of a walled city with multiple layers of ruins, which might have been the result of multiple attacks over time. Whether or not this was the site of the Trojan War is still up for debate, but it's clear that Schliemann believed that he had discovered the home of king Priam and the legendary Trojan horse.

That said, not everyone agrees with Schliemann's findings. In fact, some scholars argue that the city he found wasn't actually Troy at all, but another nearby city with a similar name. Others point out that the ruins he found don't quite match up with the descriptions of the city in the Iliad. Additionally, there is evidence that suggests that the Trojan War didn't happen exactly as it was told in the myth. For example, it's possible that the conflict arose over economic disputes rather than the kidnapping of Helen.

Despite the disagreements among scholars, one thing is for sure: The Trojan War has had a lasting impact on culture and has become one of the most well-known stories from Greek mythology. It has been retold in countless books, movies, and TV shows over the years, and the characters from the story continue to inspire us today. The Trojan hero Hector, for example, has become synonymous with bravery, while Odysseus's journey home has been the inspiration for many other epic tales.

Are there influences of Greek mythology in our modern culture?

I've been deeply fascinated by Greek mythology for as long as I can remember—its epic tales, deities, and heroes that have influenced countless aspects of Western culture. Recently, I've started to ponder more deeply about its presence and influence in our contemporary life and culture. From literature and movies to expressions and brands, it seems Greek mythology has woven itself into the very fabric of our daily experiences.

I'm curious to hear your thoughts and observations on this topic. Have you noticed any interesting or surprising ways Greek mythology manifests in today's society? Perhaps in ways we might not even immediately recognize due to how integrated they are?

Summary of the Nine Muses of Greek Mythology

I've been studying about Greek Mythology and I bumped into some information about the 9 muses. I thought I would give a summary of who they are and what they represented. I feel like the Muses are often forgotten!

In Greek mythology, the Muses were goddesses who presided over the arts and sciences, inspiring creativity and knowledge in humans. There were originally nine Muses, each with her own domain of expertise. Here's a summary of who they were:
  1. Calliope: The Muse of epic poetry and eloquence. She was often depicted with a writing tablet or a scroll.
  2. Clio: The Muse of history. She was often depicted holding a scroll or a set of tablets, symbolizing the recording of historical events.
  3. Euterpe: The Muse of music, song, and lyric poetry. She was often depicted holding a flute or a double flute.
  4. Thalia: The Muse of comedy and bucolic poetry. She was often depicted with a comic mask, a shepherd's crook, or a wreath of ivy.
  5. Melpomene: The Muse of tragedy. She was often depicted holding a tragic mask and a sword or club.
  6. Terpsichore: The Muse of dance and choral poetry. She was often depicted holding a lyre and dancing.
  7. Erato: The Muse of love poetry and lyric poetry. She was often depicted holding a lyre and a wreath of roses.
  8. Polyhymnia: The Muse of sacred poetry, hymns, and eloquence. She was often depicted in a pensive or meditative pose, sometimes holding a finger to her lips.
  9. Urania: The Muse of astronomy and astrology. She was often depicted holding a globe and a compass, symbolizing the study of celestial bodies and their movements.
Together, the Muses served as sources of inspiration for poets, musicians, artists, and scholars, guiding and nurturing creative endeavors in ancient Greek culture.

muses-greek-mythology.jpg
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