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amygdalE

Member
As I am interested in comparing modern Greek culture with ancient Greek and non-Greek cultures, I found a very informative post on how name-day is celebrated in Orthodox Greece, which is essntially the same as in Catholic Italy, although this custom is vanishing in Italy. Anyway, the given list of Greek names informs me they have different origins -- a cultural fact: [this URL works only occasionally]
https://greekreporter.com/2021/03/19/greek-name-days-greek-orthodox-tradition
I wish to add that the celebration of name/onoma-day goes back to the Dorian custom of officially giving a name to a child 10 days after his birth, without reference to the festive days of the gods. Thus a given child could be identified as a citizen of his polis. The Dorians took their customs with them wherever they migrated; so, we find that in Palestine, the Hebrews gave a name to a child 9 days after his birth, when he was taken to the temple for circumcision, whereby he was inducted to the holy People of God. The presentation/manifestation of Jesus to the temple was naturally called Epiphany [Epiphaneia] by the Greek Chistians. The Hebrew Epiphany-day corresponds to the Christian Baptism-day, which happens to be the name-day. (In the 13th century, baptismal records were kept in Latin-rite churches. So, we know how a child's first and last name were formulated. E.g.: Marco Ferrari [Marco son of Ferraro/*Ferrarus/the smith], using the Latin gentive case, which had disappeared in the emerging Italian language. {{Merry Epiphany/Chistmas.}}
 
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seleanor

Active member
As I am interested in comparing modern Greek culture with ancient Greek and non-Greek cultures, I found a very informative post on how name-day is celebrated in Orthodox Greece, which is essntially the same as in Catholic Italy, although this custom is vanishing in Italy. Anyway, the given list of Greek names informs me they have different origins -- a cultural fact:
www.greekreporter.com/2021/03/19/greek-name-days-greek-orthodox-tradition
I wish to add that the celebration of name/onoma-day goes back to the Dorian custom of officially giving a name to a child 10 days after his birth, without reference to the festive days of the gods. Thus a given child could be identified as a citizen of his polis. The Dorians took their customs with them wherever they migrated; so, we find that in Palestine, the Hebrews gave a name to a child 9 days after his birth, when he was taken to the temple for circumcision, whereby he was inducted to the holy People of God. The presentation/manifestation of Jesus to the temple was naturally called Epiphany [Epiphaneia] by the Greek Chistians. The Hebrew Epiphany-day corresponds to the Christian Baptism-day, which happens to be the name-day. (In the 13th century, baptismal records were kept in Latin-rite churches. So, we know how a child's first and last name were formulated. E.g.: Marco Ferrari [Marco son of Ferraro/*Ferrarus/the smith], using the Latin gentive case, which had disappeared in the emerging Italian language. {{Merry Epiphany/Chistmas.}}
Beautiful! The link you shared from Greek reporter isn't working! Can you post the working one? Thanks :)
 

amygdalE

Member
Beautiful! The link you shared from Greek reporter isn't working! Can you post the working one? Thanks :)
It's frustrating! Please click again and when the GREEKREPORTER site appears, click on their "greek name days". (Other sites on the same subject do not have a list of Greek names or a calendar of name celebrations.)
 
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Patisqua

Member
In years gone by we celebrated Namedays. We visited friends and family on the Sunday after the Nameday. We were offered brandy and Port, glass of water, a chocolate bar or glyko tou koutali followed by mezethes. For really close relatives lunch or dinner. It was a great way of keeping in touch. Invitations were not issued, you just turned up. As that generation reposed, unfortunately so did the tradition. Now we might call, send a text or email.
 

greek_ggirl

Active member
In years gone by we celebrated Namedays. We visited friends and family on the Sunday after the Nameday. We were offered brandy and Port, glass of water, a chocolate bar or glyko tou koutali followed by mezethes. For really close relatives lunch or dinner. It was a great way of keeping in touch. Invitations were not issued, you just turned up. As that generation reposed, unfortunately so did the tradition. Now we might call, send a text or email.
I miss this tradition so dearly. I want to bring it back amongst my friends and family, at least those who live close by so we can share what's going on in our lives. It feels like we've grown apart, and some of us have gotten lost. But one thing that Covid has taught me is that it's really important to stay close to your loved ones and of course enjoy the little things like glyko tou koutali
 

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