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seleanor

Active member
This classic tragedy is still read and performed today. In the play, a father leaves his own son, Oedipus, to die in a field. Rather than die, he is taken in by another family and raised. While with this family, Oedipus is told by an Oracle that he will murder his father and sleep with his mother. Despite his best efforts to prevent this from happening, he does both of these things.
 

amygdalE

Member
This classic tragedy is still read and performed today. In the play, a father leaves his own son, Oedipus, to die in a field. Rather than die, he is taken in by another family and raised. While with this family, Oedipus is told by an Oracle that he will murder his father and sleep with his mother. Despite his best efforts to prevent this from happening, he does both of these things.
Where do you find tragedy? In the verification of the oracle or in somethimg else?
 

paharo45

Active member
Where do you find tragedy? In the verification of the oracle or in somethimg else?
I thought tragedy is what they call all Greek plays?
 

amygdalE

Member
I thought tragedy is what they call all Greek plays?
No, my friend. There are two main species of Greek plays (dramas): tragedy and comedy. Aristophanes wrote comedies. In extreme forms, comedies are called farces. I will not answer the question I asked you; I will only point out that "tragedy" [< trago-ode : goat-song] originally was a lament by goat-attired men who exactly mourned the death of Dionysus (the mythical god-man, the son of Zeus and a human female, wherefore he inherited a double nature, just as Jesus of Nazareth will do in more recent times. The theater where tragedies were performed always had an altar to Dionysos, even when the tragedies had nothing to do with Him. But then, why do we call some dramas tragedies? What is lamented (usually by a chorus -- in a drama itself-- that represents the witnesses of something "tragic"? There are many theories, as by Aristotle, by Nietzsche, and others.
 
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paharo45

Active member
No, my friend. There are two main species of Greek plays (dramas): tragedy and comedy. Aristophanes wrote comedies. In extreme forms, comedies are called farces. I will not answer the question I asked you; I will only point out that "tragedy" [< trago-ode : goat-song] originally was a lament by goat-attired men who exactly mourned the death of Dionysus (the mythical god-man, the son of Zeus and a human female, wherefore he inherited a double nature, just as Jesus of Nazareth will do in more recent times. The theater where tragedies were performed always had an altar to Dionysos, even when the tragedies had nothing to do with Him. But then, why do we call some dramas tragedies? What is lamented (usually by a chorus -- in a drama itself-- that represents the witnesses of something "tragic"? There are many theories, as by Aristotle, by Nietzsche, and others.
Interesting how there is no in-between, just tragedy and comedy. Funny to think of our media now and how there are so many categories
 

Did you know that dozens of ancient theaters are still operating in Greece?

Theater was a huge part of the ancient Greek civilization, and it's still important in modern Greece today. Greeks loves theater, and you were always see flyers for different shows going on. Many of these are presented in ancient amphitheatres that were built thousands of years ago. If you're in Greece, I really recommend that you check one out. There are even plays for young children.


Here is a list of showings around Greece: https://parallaximag.gr/theatro

You can use a google translate browser add on to translate the page.

History of the Orthodox Church in Greece

I know that there is some information about the early church in Greece in the Bible.

Are there other resources to check out that aren't online? I am not sure I trust the online sources.

I know that the early church was set up in places like Ephesus, and that Paul did a lot to speak on the things.

Remembering Metaxas as Oxi Day Approaches

From what I understand, Metaxas was a somewhat controversial figure in Greece. However, he is the one who stood his ground against the Axis Powers when they wanted Greece to allow occupation during World War II without a fight.

I guess at the time, a representative from Italy gave Metaxas an ultimatum from Mussolini. I heard somewhere that what he really said was: “Alors, c’est la guerre.” Which means, then it is war. The Greek people translated it as "Oxi".

In my mind, this is Philotimo. Standing against Italy and the Axis Powers was the right thing to do.

Does anyone know why Metaxas is generally considered controversial? Does it have to do with Oxi day or something else?

Fascinated by Minoan culture and I want to learn more...

I am festinated by the Minoan culture. I saw photos of the Knossos Palace, as well as some of the Frescos, and I realized that I want to learn more about them. I know, I can read history books or look it up online. But, I am talking about experiencing it first hand. Do you guys have any recommendations? I was thinking to visit Crete and seeing some of the ruins... are there any tours you can recommend?
Share and discuss Greek history!

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