1 - 5 of 5 Posts

dpappas87

Member
I am getting ready to make melamakarona (doing a test run before Christmas) and it's been a while ... I have some questions!

** I see some recipes that use all-purpose flour, and some that use semolina. Which is better? Does it matteR?

** A lot of recipes use a combo of nutmeg, cinnamon, and cloves. Can I just use cinnamon or do I really need the other spices?

** Some recipes include honey in the syrup and some only include sugar and water. What's your favorite way to make the syrup?

Thanks!
 

Luana

New member
Semolina is essential in melamakarona. It's usually about 1/3 semolina, and the rest is regular flour. Lots of recipes online if you don't have one. Semolina adds that kind of grainy texture that make these unique.

I think you're fine with cinnamon and a small amount of nutmeg.

I was taught to make syrup with sugar and water only. No honey! Ever! This from the aunt who made the best baklava ever. She said, honey is too sweet. I make syrup with 2 cups sugar and 2 cups water. Bring to a slow-ish boil. It's done when syrup falls slowly off wooden spoon.

Hope this helps.
 

Luana

New member
I am getting ready to make melamakarona (doing a test run before Christmas) and it's been a while ... I have some questions!

** I see some recipes that use all-purpose flour, and some that use semolina. Which is better? Does it matteR?

** A lot of recipes use a combo of nutmeg, cinnamon, and cloves. Can I just use cinnamon or do I really need the other spices?

** Some recipes include honey in the syrup and some only include sugar and water. What's your favorite way to make the syrup?

Thanks!
 

lalajess

Member
Semolina is essential in melamakarona. It's usually about 1/3 semolina, and the rest is regular flour. Lots of recipes online if you don't have one. Semolina adds that kind of grainy texture that make these unique.

I think you're fine with cinnamon and a small amount of nutmeg.

I was taught to make syrup with sugar and water only. No honey! Ever! This from the aunt who made the best baklava ever. She said, honey is too sweet. I make syrup with 2 cups sugar and 2 cups water. Bring to a slow-ish boil. It's done when syrup falls slowly off wooden spoon.

Hope this helps.
I didn't know that about Semolina and malamakarona! I usually do use semolina, but the one time I didn't, something felt off. I didn't make the connection that it was the flour.
 

PemiKanavos

Administrator
Staff member
There are many variations of the melomakarona recipe. Some do use semolina while others don’t. Some use only olive oil while other use have olive half vegetable oil, or honey in the syrup while others use just sugar. It’s I guess a personal preference and what your taste buds have been accustomed to all the years of eating melomakarona.
Semolina is use in some recipes not only to add a bit of texture, but it actually acts as a soaking agent. It helps to soak up more syrup.
Some people don’t like the axed texture and prefer plain flour instead. But either version is still delicious.
The secret to melomakarona is not to o er mix the dough and NOT to over bake the cookie.
 

How to Use Spoon Sweets?

I am about to make my first ever spoon sweet. Someone told me that there was a it of a ritual associated with it?

I went over someone's house once and they gave me some spoon sweets with some Greek coffee and water. I am kind of getting the feeling that this is a pretty typical experience?

Besides the ritual, how else are spoon sweets used? Can I eat them like jam?

Other "Leaves" to Use for Stuffing?

I have seen various "stuffed" leaf-type dishes in Greek cuisine, and I am realizing that the filling is always pretty similar. The two common ones I see are grape leaves (delicious in early summer when I can pick the leaves) and cabbage.

I noticed that there are other types of "leaves" that can be used. I think someone says they often use Swiss chard? What else can be used? I love every type of dish in this category. Thanks!

Quick Greek Dinner Ideas

Many of the Greek dishes I know how to cook are very time consuming for me to put together, like stuffed grape leaves and spanakopita.

Sometimes, I want to eat Greek food, but I don't want to spend a lot of time in the kitchen. Can you think of some easy Greek suppers besides salads to eat? I cook village salad and cabbage salad, but am also open for suggestions for different salads. I know I could always serve souvlaki with them. I know that is fairly quick, aside from the marinating.

Greek-Style Fish "Dressing"

I don't know what else to call this ... I bumped into a recipe for ladolemono that had olive oil, lemon, oregano, garlic, and some onion. I decided to make a ladolemono similar to this, but adjust the seasonings for fish.

I plan to make salmon this week! So instead of oregano I will be using freshly chopped dill, and I think garlic would be too strong from salmon so am going to use a small shallow and no onion either. What do you guys think? I think it sounds like it will be delicious, and I can maybe even use this for other seafood if it goes well.

Quick Greek-style pasta dishes?

Last time I was in Greece I ate a lot of pasta dishes. It seems like a common dish for every day cuisine. I had a version with Greek yogurt - I would love to learn how to make it! I also had something with an egg on it, someone told me it was from Mani? Does anyone know anything about these dishes? What other pasta dishes do Greeks eat?
Sign up for a free account and share your thoughts, photos, questions about Greek food, travel and culture!

WorldwideGreeks.com is a free online forum community where people can discuss Greek food, travel, traditions, history and mythology. Join Worldwide Greeks here!

JOIN COMMUNITY FOR FREE

LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT
Follow Worldwide Greeks:
Facebook Twitter Instagram
TikTok Pinterest YouTube
Top