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auroracoor1

Active member
I love pasteli so I decided to learn how to make it. Here it is:

- 1 cup toasted sesame seeds
- 1 cup Greek honey

I stir the two together in a saucepan and let it cook on medium-low heat until the hard crack candy stage temperature occurs - around 300 Degrees F (use a candy thermometer). So this is above the boiling point. After that occurs, I pour it over waxed paper and once it sets, I break it apart into pieces with a sharp knife.
 
This looks pretty close to how I make it. I need to use a candy thermometer to get the texture right, as well. Otherwise I don't let it cook enough.
 

Tips on How to Make Greek Olive Bread

I'm a big fan of Mediterranean cuisine and lately, I've been craving some authentic Greek olive bread. I've tried a couple of recipes, but I still feel there's something missing to make it just right.

Does anyone have any tried-and-true tips or secret ingredients that can elevate my Greek olive bread? I'm especially interested in:
  • Types of olives that work best
  • Tips for getting the perfect crust
  • Any herbs or spices that add authentic flavor
  • Baking techniques that ensure a soft, flavorful inside
Looking forward to hearing your suggestions! Thanks in advance for your help.

Different kinds of Greek salads?

I love horiatiki when I go to Greece - but I also noticed other types of salads being served.

Do they have names?

I tried one or two of them and most of them involved greens - like lettuce, etc.

Are they just the invention of the restaurant or are they common dishes? I guess it's hard to truly know unless I can share examples from restaurants, but Id didn't think to take pics last time I was in Greece.

Greek Grilled Pita Bread - A Recipe

I love to grill - it's that time of year! I grilled some souvlaki the other day and decide to also make some pita bread. I had the dough all prepped. It came out great and tasted good with the souvlaki. Here's the recipe:

Ingredients:​

  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (plus extra for dusting)
  • 1 1/2 cups warm water (about 110°F)
  • 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions:​

  1. Activate the Yeast:
    • In a small bowl, combine the warm water, sugar, and yeast. Stir gently and let it sit for about 5-10 minutes until it becomes frothy.
  2. Prepare the Dough:
    • In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour and salt.
    • Make a well in the center of the flour and pour in the yeast mixture and olive oil.
    • Mix with a wooden spoon or your hands until the dough starts to come together.
  3. Knead the Dough:
    • Transfer the dough onto a floured surface.
    • Knead the dough for about 8-10 minutes until it becomes smooth and elastic. If the dough is too sticky, add a little more flour as needed.
  4. First Rise:
    • Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, turning it to coat all sides with oil.
    • Cover the bowl with a clean kitchen towel or plastic wrap and let the dough rise in a warm place for about 1-2 hours, or until it has doubled in size.
  5. Shape the Pitas:
    • Once the dough has risen, punch it down to release any air.
    • Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces and shape each piece into a ball.
    • On a lightly floured surface, roll out each ball into a circle about 1/4 inch thick.
  6. Second Rise:
    • Place the rolled-out dough circles on a lightly floured surface or baking sheet.
    • Cover them with a clean kitchen towel and let them rise for about 20-30 minutes.
  7. Grill the Pitas:
    • Preheat your grill to medium-high heat.
    • Place the pitas on the grill and cook for about 2-3 minutes on each side, or until they are puffed up and have nice grill marks.
    • If you prefer, you can also cook them in a cast-iron skillet or on a griddle over medium-high heat.

What is different about Greek cuisine in the US?

I am a Greek American living in the Boston area, and I have also been to Greece a lot.

I have noticed that there are some differences between here and Greece in terms of cuisine. I can't put my finger on it, but I know that things are just different.

Does anyone have any insights as to why? I feel like a large part is the freshness of all the ingredients. But I think the recipes are different, too.

Any advice on how I can recreate some of that magic here?

Favorite Greek comfort foods?

I'm curious to know: what are your favorite Greek comfort foods?

Personally, I've heard a lot about moussaka and spanakopita, but I haven't had the chance to try them yet. Do you have any recommendations or recipes for these dishes? Or perhaps there are other less-known but equally delicious Greek comfort foods I should be aware of?

Looking forward to hearing your favorites and any tips you have for making or finding these comforting dishes!
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