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toniiv

Member
It really does enhance your experience to learn some Greek, or brush up on your existing Greek, before you visit. I thought I would put together a list of some of the best resources I have found - they're all free.

- Duolingo has Greek now - I am not sure how effective it is, but it is free and that alone makes it worth checking out.
- Easy Greek on Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/c/EasyGreekVideos - they have a lot of great content - I love how they interview people on the street
- Podcasts - There are plenty of learn Greek podcasts on both Spotify and through Apple and they are all worth checking out - For example, Easy Greek also has a podcast and there's a good one called "It's All Greek to Me". There are a lot of others.

In addition, you can check out various language programs (these aren't free). I like Pimsleur for conversational Greek, Rosetta Stone is pretty good, Mango, and there are others but those are the ones I have tried.

Which language programs have you used for Greek, and what were your results?
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member

kcixcy

Active member
This is a great list of resources, thanks for sharing. For me, I'd just be learning Greek because I want to be able to communicate with my husband's family. I've tried duolingo but it doesn't seem like enough.
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
This is a great list of resources, thanks for sharing. For me, I'd just be learning Greek because I want to be able to communicate with my husband's family. I've tried duolingo but it doesn't seem like enough.
No surprise. Duolingo is terrible
 

k_tsoukalas

Moderator
I've used books more than programs. The issue with programs is that many of them do not teach you grammar or how to conjugate, and if you really want to learn Greek then you need to learn the mechanics of the language and not just a few phrases. I used this book to teach my nieces and nephew Greek.

https://www.amazon.com/Manual-Moder...lpcontext&ref_=fplfs&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER
Do you have a book/ formal program you like the best?

Agreed. Books will give you the foundation you need to function long term in a language. I have used Pimsleur with great success, but this was only after I had formerly studied the language in question. I found that Pimsleur was great for giving my conversation skills authenticity and making my responses flow naturally. Not sure it would have been as helpful if I did Pimsleur first without studying the language. I might try a similar approach when brushing up on my Greek.
 

What games do people play in Greece?

I noticed that there is a taverna culture of "gaming". I see tavli played all the time. Are there other games people play?

I am wondering if people play chess, checkers, that kind of thing? What about physical games like bocci like they play a lot in Italy? I have seen this game in Switzerland and other places, too, and wonder if the Greeks also play it.

Also, what do kids play for games in Greece?

Do you have any favorite Greek traditions for Christmas?

I know that there are a lot of Greek traditions and some of it depends on where in Greece you or your family is from. I thought I would share mine, I want to hear yours!

** Singing Greek Christmas songs together and going out caroling
** Agios Vasselios - "Greek Santa Claus"
** Melamakarona (Can't wait! It's almost time to start making them!

What are yours?

How Do Greeks Celebrate Ohi Day?

I looked up Ohi Day resentful because I learned it was occurring soon. I find the history so interesting! I know that Greeks have the day off. I am wondering how Greeks typically celebrate it? The events surrounding the day seemed to represent Greece's ability to stand up for what was right and to resist the Axis forces. It was the right thing to do to not let the Axis enter Greece easily so that they can have a strategic place for their troops.

To celebrate this important part of history today, though, what do the Greeks do today?

Kalikantzaros - Spooky Christmas Tradition

I am learning a bit more about Greek Christmas traditions, and I just bumped into something pretty spooky - the kalikantzaros, which are Christmas goblins. What really strikes me as that they aren't cutesy Christmas goblins. They appear to be pretty mean! Does anyone know more about them? They are a part of folklore not only in Greece apparently, but also in Serbia, Bulgaria, etc. I would love for you guys to share what you know about them.

How do you choose a name day?

I am wondering how you guys all choose a name day to celebrate. For example, I have a friend named John, and there are multiple saints that have that name. He said he chose the saint that resonated the most with him. I have another friend, also named John, who celebrated a different one because that is the one that the parents had selected. How do you know what the right choice is?
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

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