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I'm Greek-Australian, and I've never considered getting a Greek passport until COVID made it easier to travel to Greece with proof of citizenship/passport. Do any other children of Greek immigrants have passports? Have you found it to be worth it?
 
I am not sure if having a Greek passport helps with COVID travel restrictions in Greece.

I would recommend reaching out to your local (in Australia) Greek consulate and asking this type of question.

Hope this helps and good luck figuring it all out! :)
 
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I found it pretty useful because I'm able to travel around Europe very easily. If you don't think you'll be travelling to Europe, I wouldn't really recommend it. The Australian passport is pretty useful and can get you most places without a tourist visa. If that ever changes, I would look into it then.
 
Greek tourism will be open this year starting sometime in May for those who have received the COVID vaccine or to those who have taken a current COVID test. I would check the rules. I am not sure a passport would make a difference because the rules might be the same for everyone, regardless of which passport you have.
 
I've thought about getting a Greek passport. However, after weighing the pros and cons, I decided it wasn't worth it. The main Con is that you'll need to deal w/ the Greek government and that is a nightmare. If you've never had that pleasure, try something simple while in Greece. Go to the local police station and ask about getting an extension on your Schengen visa. They will direct you to another office, which will then direct you to another office, and so on. This can go on for several days until you find someone who actually takes the time to help. Otherwise, everyone you meet will scream at you as if you've committed a crime and tell you to go back to the office you just came from. Nobody knows the answer, but they all act like they do ... and it's always coffee break time, so "please come back later!" This is a country where they pay public employees a bonus just for showing up on time. The main reason I decided not to get a Greek passport is b/c I'm not really Greek. I didn't grow up there. So, I don't know the laws. I don't want to be stopped at the airport b/c there's suddenly a new banana-republic tax I didn't know about, or they decided to restrict access to ATMs, etc.

Instead of a Greek passport, you may want to look into a Financially Independent Persons residency program visa if you were planning to live there. This page describes the requirements - https://greekresidency.com/golden-visa/fip-residency-for-financially-independent/.
 
I've thought about getting a Greek passport. However, after weighing the pros and cons, I decided it wasn't worth it. The main Con is that you'll need to deal w/ the Greek government and that is a nightmare. If you've never had that pleasure, try something simple while in Greece. Go to the local police station and ask about getting an extension on your Schengen visa. They will direct you to another office, which will then direct you to another office, and so on. This can go on for several days until you find someone who actually takes the time to help. Otherwise, everyone you meet will scream at you as if you've committed a crime and tell you to go back to the office you just came from. Nobody knows the answer, but they all act like they do ... and it's always coffee break time, so "please come back later!" This is a country where they pay public employees a bonus just for showing up on time. The main reason I decided not to get a Greek passport is b/c I'm not really Greek. I didn't grow up there. So, I don't know the laws. I don't want to be stopped at the airport b/c there's suddenly a new banana-republic tax I didn't know about, or they decided to restrict access to ATMs, etc.

Instead of a Greek passport, you may want to look into a Financially Independent Persons residency program visa if you were planning to live there. This page describes the requirements - https://greekresidency.com/golden-visa/fip-residency-for-financially-independent/.
You have a good point. It is difficult if you're not from there or aren't in the loop about the new laws and updates
 
I've thought about getting a Greek passport. However, after weighing the pros and cons, I decided it wasn't worth it. The main Con is that you'll need to deal w/ the Greek government and that is a nightmare. If you've never had that pleasure, try something simple while in Greece. Go to the local police station and ask about getting an extension on your Schengen visa. They will direct you to another office, which will then direct you to another office, and so on. This can go on for several days until you find someone who actually takes the time to help. Otherwise, everyone you meet will scream at you as if you've committed a crime and tell you to go back to the office you just came from. Nobody knows the answer, but they all act like they do ... and it's always coffee break time, so "please come back later!" This is a country where they pay public employees a bonus just for showing up on time. The main reason I decided not to get a Greek passport is b/c I'm not really Greek. I didn't grow up there. So, I don't know the laws. I don't want to be stopped at the airport b/c there's suddenly a new banana-republic tax I didn't know about, or they decided to restrict access to ATMs, etc.

Instead of a Greek passport, you may want to look into a Financially Independent Persons residency program visa if you were planning to live there. This page describes the requirements - https://greekresidency.com/golden-visa/fip-residency-for-financially-independent/.
I know this is an old post but reading your comment got me to spill my coffee lol.
 

Tips for visiting monasteries in Greece

While visiting the monasteries, remember you are in a sacred place. Dress modestly, with legs and shoulders covered, to show respect for the local customs and faith. Keep your voice low to preserve the peaceful ambiance and adhere to any photography restrictions to respect the privacy of the monks.

I've had some people ask me, so I thought I'd start a post about etiquette. If you are out taking tours and you don't dress properly, be sure to look for a scarf or skirt (for the ladies) that they may provide to make you respectable enough to enter the space. It's far better, though, to dress properly in your own wardrobe!

Loud talking is a no-no. It's also a good idea to observe Orthodox customs when entering the sacred space, even if you aren't Orthodox. Non-orthodox may venerate icons, light candles, submit prayer requests, etc.

Can anyone think of anything else to add?

Canyoning Bled Slovenia

Hi guys!!
I'm planning to take a group canyoning Bled but apparently, it is obligatory to use a local guide. I am a canyon instructor (caf and ffme), is this enough to supervise without anyone else? I have several years of experience (climbing and canyoning) and it is obvious that I will not be able to offer this destination if it is not possible.
Thanks in advance

Last-minute travel tips in Greece

I love to travel to Greece and I do so whenever I can. There's an art to it, though, and I am never really going into it "blind". It's a good idea to start by thinking generally about where you might want to go.

Athens is usually the starting point for most travelers, with its iconic Acropolis offering panoramic views and a history lesson all in one spot. If you're a beach lover, head towards the Cyclades for stunning beaches and the classic, postcard-worthy Santorini sunsets. Or, if it's history you're after, the ruins of Delphi or the ancient city of Mycenae will surely captivate you.

Then, we need to figure out how to get where we want to go. For island hopping, the ferries are an experience in themselves – though if you're time-strapped, consider a local flight to get you to the major islands quickly. On the mainland, a mix of car rentals and public transport can be efficient and economical, especially when visiting sites off the tourist map. Keep an eye on the schedules and book in advance if possible to save time.

Sometimes I rent a car, to be honest it's the easiest for me.

The rest of the details tend to sort themselves out. For example, you can book your lodging as you go along, especially off-peak.

Pack List for Trip to Greece in Spring

I have a trip to Greece planned in the spring. Mainly, I want advice on the weather. In the meantime, I made my best guess and came up with a list. Anything to add or subtract?

Clothing
  • A light rain jacket or windbreaker: For the inevitable April showers
  • A couple of long-sleeve shirts: For those cooler mornings
  • A lightweight sweater: For layering when temperature changes
  • A pair of comfortable pants: Think breathable fabrics like cotton, and a pair of jeans.
  • Shorts and a sundress: For warmer afternoons
  • Comfortable walking shoes: You’ll be exploring villages and ancient ruins, so cushioned soles are a must.
Accessories
  • A versatile scarf: Can double as a shawl on cooler evenings
  • A wide-brimmed hat: For sun protection
  • Sunglasses and sunscreen: Essential for beach days
  • Reusable water bottle: To stay hydrated without contributing more waste

Itinerary for self-planned yacht trip through the Greek islands

I am working on planning a yacht trip through Greece. I live it because I am in total control of the itinerary and what goes on, unlike booking a cruise or something. There's enough of us in the group to make this a super affordable trip.

I am developing am itinerary - thought I'd run it by you:

  1. Athens to Mykonos: Begin in the historic port of Athens and make your way to the cosmopolitan island of Mykonos. Dock at Agios Ioannis beach and take a stroll through Little Venice.
  2. Mykonos to Naxos: Naxos awaits, with its marble gateway to nowhere and beautiful beaches. Try the local kitron liqueur for a true taste of the island.
  3. Santorini: Sail to the iconic island of Santorini, where the sunset from Oia is second to none. Enjoy a swim in the hot springs of Palea Kameni and taste some of the best wines in Greece.
  4. Ios to Folegandros: Keep the vibes high in Ios known for its lively atmosphere, then find tranquility in Folegandros, where the untouched Mediterranean prevails.
  5. Return to Athens: Wrap up your adventure with a pitstop in Syros, the capital of the Cyclades. Its charm lies in its austere yet handsome neoclassical buildings and the stunning Aegean views.

What do you think? Anything to add or subtract? I have about 10 days.

yacht-greece.jpg
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