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efhernandez_

Active member
I was invited to a Greek wedding this summer, but unfortunately I am unable to go because my work schedule is just a bit too hectic. The couple has a registry, which makes me wonder if I should still get a gift even if I'm not able to go to the wedding. Does anyone know what the expectation or custom is for a Greek weddings? The couple is from the United States, but they are both Greek American and having their wedding in Greece. I am super bummed out that I am missed, and I would say that I'm relatively close to the groom, we worked together previously.
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
You can do whatever you want. I doubt the couple will get upset if you decide not to buy them anything.

I just had my wedding in Greece (and I'm from the USA) and some people who didn't show up bought us gifts while others didn't. We really didn't care if people bought us anything or not. What we really liked was getting messages from people who couldn't attend telling us congratulations and wishing us a happy marriage.
 

Hash

Well-known member
You can do whatever you want. I doubt the couple will get upset if you decide not to buy them anything.

I just had my wedding in Greece (and I'm from the USA) and some people who didn't show up bought us gifts while others didn't. We really didn't care if people bought us anything or not. What we really liked was getting messages from people who couldn't attend telling us congratulations and wishing us a happy marriage.
Happy years ahead!♥️🌹....Stini Yasou for your wedding....Tell us more if you feel.... where did you have it?... Fillya from Thailand and Monsoons.....and how....the sea is @force Gail 9 Beaufort!
 
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ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
Happy years ahead!♥️🌹....Stini Yasou for your wedding....Tell us more if you feel.... where did you have it?... Fillya from Thailand and Monsoons.....and how....the sea is @force Gail 9 Beaufort!
Well, our wedding was set for 7:00pm in the mountains at an venue where we could have an outdoor wedding. The day of the wedding, I got dressed at the venue which happened to be next to the church. My brother and nephew helped me get dressed. At the same time, at my wife's house, they were having fun as she got dressed, and after she was fully dressed, they all danced. Back at the venue where I was getting dressed, I had quite a few family members over and we had a lot of food to eat while I got dressed. The photographers took photos of us all. At 6:30 our guests started showing up. My wife's koubara showed up early and gave me the bouquet to hold (in Greek weddings, the groom holds the bouquet and gives it to the bride when she meets him at the church entrance).... around 7:00pm we heard a lot of cars honking - this means the groom or the bride is approaching the church, and since I was already at the church with my family it could only me that my wife's family was approaching.

My wife arrived at the venue and I'm standing at the church entrance waiting for her at this point. A band goes to the entrance where my wife will come from, they start playing music and they lead her and her family all the way up to the church entrance to me. We walk to the alter (it's outside) and everyone follows behind us. Then the ceremony began.

For the reception, we entered with fireworks showering on both sides of us (this is a Greek thing), we walked straight to the stage, cut the cake, and had out first dance as soon as we cut the cake. Then we ate, my father-in-law gave a short speech, and mirolόi (a song of remembrance for everyone who has passed away) and we danced. The first dance is for family only and the koubaroi.. After we danced, everyone else joined in. In Greece, guests pay for songs to be played for their family, so we danced nonstop because people wanted to tribute songs to their family. This made me very tired because dances are often 15-20 minutes long, so you don't get to rest, and you have to dance each song out of respect for the family that paid for the song. The last song of the night was a zeibekiko (this is how you tell guests that the reception is over) around 4:00am, which the groom has to dance, so I danced zeibekiko and then people started to leave.

video of me dancing zeibekiko
 
Last edited:

k_tsoukalas

Moderator
Can you send money or do a direct deposit? I would say money is more expected then gifts but I could be wrong.
 

Hash

Well-known member
Well, our wedding was set for 7:00pm in the mountains at an venue where we could have an outdoor wedding. The day of the wedding, I got dressed at the venue which happened to be next to the church. My brother and nephew helped me get dressed. At the same time, at my wife's house, they were having fun as she got dressed, and after she was fully dressed, they all danced. Back at the venue where I was getting dressed, I had quite a few family members over and we had a lot of food to eat while I got dressed. The photographers took photos of us all. At 6:30 our guests started showing up. My wife's koubara showed up early and gave me the bouquet to hold (in Greek weddings, the groom holds the bouquet and gives it to the bride when she meets him at the church entrance).... around 7:00pm we heard a lot of cars honking - this means the groom or the bride is approaching the church, and since I was already at the church with my family it could only me that my wife's family was approaching.

My wife arrived at the venue and I'm standing at the church entrance waiting for her at this point. A band goes to the entrance where my wife will come from, they start playing music and they lead her and her family all the way up to the church entrance to me. We walk to the alter (it's outside) and everyone follows behind us. Then the ceremony began.

For the reception, we entered with fireworks showering on both sides of us (this is a Greek thing), we walked straight to the stage, cut the cake, and had out first dance as soon as we cut the cake. Then we ate, my father-in-law gave a short speech, and mirolόi (a song of remembrance for everyone who has passed away) and we danced. The first dance is for family only and the koubaroi.. After we danced, everyone else joined in. In Greece, guests pay for songs to be played for their family, so we danced nonstop because people wanted to tribute songs to their family. This made me very tired because dances are often 15-20 minutes long, so you don't get to rest, and you have to dance each song out of respect for the family that paid for the song. The last song of the night was a zeibekiko (this is how you tell guests that the reception is over) around 4:00am, which the groom has to dance, so I danced zeibekiko and then people started to leave.

video of me dancing zeibekiko
I haven't forgotten to say a few lines of my appreciation for writing such a magnificent description.... Terrific dancing....I will write more later on.... just that your Zeibetiko tune took me back to middle 90s spending cold winter months in Mykonos.....I was mostly alone in the Taverna in Ano Mera Mykonos where the son of Mayor was rehearsing this tune everyday.....and what a joy it was to listen to.....and then it was the signature tune for the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games in 2004!..... Yasou apo mena from Thailand and Monsoons!👏👏
 

ladytina

Member
Can you send money or do a direct deposit? I would say money is more expected then gifts but I could be wrong.
I agree, I would send a gift, but keep it simple. Money or a direct deposit works. This is especially worth it if you're close to the people, like a close family member or close friend.
 

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