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mastichas09

Active member
I love the history of this place! In 480 BC, along with the other two city-states, ancient Ialyssos formed a confederation to protect themselves. Together, these three would form the capital of Rhodes. The capital stretched from this area to present day Rhodes Town. You will see the Temple of Athena, the Doric fountain-house, and the Byzantine fortifications.

ialyssos.jpg
 

tomipark

Active member
I loved this place! My cousin insisted that we take a guided tour and it was actually great even though I usually don't like tour guides. There is so much to learn I highly recommend it
 
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cf_fraiser

Active member
In 2011 as a part of the local government reform it became a part of the municipality Rhodes
 

Tpebop

Active member
Best place to visit is Ancient Kamaros not far from Kamaros Scala port
 
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seleanor

Active member
Best place to visit is Ancient Kamaros not far from Kamaros Scala port
I love the archeological site there, so cool
 

k_tsoukalas

Moderator
This is a great place to visit because there is so much history! That's a great photo of it, too.
 

amygdalE

Active member
I love the history of this place! In 480 BC, along with the other two city-states, ancient Ialyssos formed a confederation to protect themselves. Together, these three would form the capital of Rhodes. The capital stretched from this area to present day Rhodes Town. You will see the Temple of Athena, the Doric fountain-house, and the Byzantine fortifications.

View attachment 332
A great picture. However, unfortunately it cannot contain its fascinating history, from its foundation by Peloponnesian people. (They were distant cousins of mine, for they founed my ancestral city, Thoyrioi in South Italy, named after the Peloponnesian Thouria.) Recently the name "Ialyssos" has intrigued me because it has seemed to be a theophoric name (a name that contains the word "god" or the name of a god), like the well known Japetos, the titan who was cast down by the Olympian gods. So, I see Japetos as Ja/Ia/Ya + petos, that is, the "Ya cast down One." So, I see Ialyssos as Ya-lyssos. Let us remember that Mount Parnassus is in the Peloponnese and that one of its peaks [where a god resides] was called YampeiE. From various linguistic evidence I have inferred that Ya was the rain-god, whereas Zeus was the storm-god.
 
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greggd12

Active member
A great picture. However, unfortunately it cannot contain its fascinating history, from its foundation by Peloponnesian people. (They were distant cousins of mine, for they founed my ancestral city, Thoyrioi in South Italy, named after the Peloponnesian Thouria.) Recently the name "Ialyssos" has intrigued me because it has seemed to be a theophoric name (a name that contains the word "god" or the name of a god), like the well known Japetos, the titan who was cast down by the Olympian gods. So, I see Japetos as Ja/Ia/Ya + petos, that is, the "Ya cast down One." So, I see Ialyssos as Ya-lyssos. Let us remember that Mount Parnassus is in the Peloponnese and that one of its peaks [where a god resides] was called YampeiE. From various linguistic evidence I have inferred that Ya was the rain-god, whereas Zeus was the storm-god.
No picture of Greece can capture the beautiful history, you have to learn about it in order to see through the picture and the landscape. That is what is most beautiful about Greece, there is history everywhere. You are right
 

amygdalE

Active member
No picture of Greece can capture the beautiful history, you have to learn about it in order to see through the picture and the landscape. That is what is most beautiful about Greece, there is history everywhere. You are right
I am sure some inhabitant of the city knows or has found the meaning of the city's name. Please divulge it.
 
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dubai_suzie

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I am sure some inhabitant of the city knows or has found the meaning of the city's name. Please divulge it.
Hmmm while I was trying to find the origins of the name I found that there was a name change of the city. Wikipedia says that is used to be called Τριάντα or Trianta before 1976
 

amygdalE

Active member
A great picture. However, unfortunately it cannot contain its fascinating history, from its foundation by Peloponnesian people. (They were distant cousins of mine, for they founed my ancestral city, Thoyrioi in South Italy, named after the Peloponnesian Thouria.) Recently the name "Ialyssos" has intrigued me because it has seemed to be a theophoric name (a name that contains the word "god" or the name of a god), like the well known Japetos, the titan who was cast down by the Olympian gods. So, I see Japetos as Ja/Ia/Ya + petos, that is, the "Ya cast down One." So, I see Ialyssos as Ya-lyssos. Let us remember that Mount Parnassus is in the Peloponnese and that one of its peaks [where a god resides] was called YampeiE. From various linguistic evidence I have inferred that Ya was the rain-god, whereas Zeus was the storm-god.
Furthermore, there are two ancient Greek words for "rain", namely Ombros (= rain-storm or thunderstorm, such as Zeus would send) and Yetos (the common rain). They said that Zeus uei as well as ombrei ; *Ya-os (and his daughters or sisters, the Yades) simply uei. (The idea that a God "causes" rain or storms is of a later date, when a God was conceived as a non-physical entity.)
 

Tpebop

Active member
Trianta & Ialyssos are 2 different places on Rhodes.
 
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blopez34

Active member
Trianta & Ialyssos are 2 different places on Rhodes.
Im googling and its coming up as the same thing...what is the difference? :)
 

Tpebop

Active member
as I said they are 2 different places.these days its difficult to know where one ends and the other begins.Trianta means 30 & named after the number of people who founded the village. some people say its named trianta because only 30 properties were originally allowed to be built there.
 
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amygdalE

Active member
Furthermore, there are two ancient Greek words for "rain", namely Ombros (= rain-storm or thunderstorm, such as Zeus would send) and Yetos (the common rain). They said that Zeus uei as well as ombrei ; *Ya-os (and his daughters or sisters, the Yades) simply uei. (The idea that a God "causes" rain or storms is of a later date, when a God was conceived as a non-physical entity.)
The aforementioned hypothetical Yaos [*Yaos] was the name of a god whose daughters or sisters are called Yades. Actually I have never seen any mention of this god; the name -- or, more exactly "YAS" [correctly Hyas], mentioned online -- is a back-formation, a modern derivation, from the extant Greek name "YA-des" [Hyades]. YA is the root; either Yas or Yaos is the constructed nominative case of the noun. "Ya" is present in "Iapetos" etc., and has variants such as "Yo". The Latin nominative Jo-us is obviously a latinization of *Yo-os or *Ya-os [or YAS, a contraction equivalent to the Latin JU, as in Jupiter/Ju-pater]. Jupiter = the father/source of what is RIGHT or JUstice (Justitia). {An ancient Roman soldier realized that Jupiter, Zeus, and Yahweh were one and the same god. Much more remains to be said.}
When the Hebrew Bible was translated into Greek, both the Elohim (the Gods) of Genesis-1 and Yahweh of Genesis-2 were translated simply as Theos (God). Thus the Greek YA of "Yahweh" was hidden. Similarly, the JU of "Jupiter" hides the original name, YOU-. Zeus or Deus or Zas is not a variant of Ya/Ia/Ja [Yas], and I do not know any myth about Yas/Yaos, the rain-god, as legislator.
 
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amygdalE

Active member
I am sure some inhabitant of the city knows or has found the meaning of the city's name. Please divulge it.
I knew the meaning of -lyssos, but the translation of the whole compound word seemed strange --
that's why I asked for assistance. Now, I came across an online list of historical personal names and their etymology. I saw the compound name LYSANDER, which they see as a Latin transcription of the Greek LYSANDROS. They translate the two components as Release and Man, wherefore presumably the whole word means "releasing man" [releaser, liberator?] or perhaps "free man". They also mention that this was the name of a Spartan commander, which suggests to me that the lexical compounding was done by the same Dorians or Peloponnesians who had migrated to Rhodes and produced the name "Ia-lyssos" for a town. Did they mean "God [Ya] liberates" or "Ya-saved"?? These translations are still strange and uncertain.
 

amygdalE

Active member
An incidental disquisition about compound words whose components are nouns, like EarthQuake and LysAndros:

Inflected languages like Latin, ancient Greek, old English, etc., had the advantage, to avoid ambiguities and to make accurate translations, precisely by the use of grammatical endings or word alterations. E.g.,
"WordAlteration" = "alteration OF a word". "PhiloTheos" = "philos theOU", but then, when the compound noun was meant to be the name of a being, it was set in a NOMINATIVE form, that is, by suffixing -OS. (So, obviously the word coiners were also perspicacious linguists/semanticists of their own works.) "TheoPhilos" = "theou philos" [= I say: god's friend, god-befriended/loved], which, used as a name, does not need an alteration. However, this "philos" has an accusative/undergoing value or sense, which I tried to convey in my second translation. //

Speaking of "Ia-Lyss(os)", it is difficult to tell whether the second component has an agent/patient (active/passive) value. The use of a verbal noun, a past participle like PETOS in IAPETOS, leaves no doubt about its value [a passive/undergoing value], wherefore I translate it as "by Ya hurled, Ya-hurled, *Iadopetos?" rather than "hurling Ya". Fortunately a myth tells us that invading titans were hurled down from Mount Olympus. Apparently, the word Iapetos is < [from] *Iadopetos by an apochope [Ia( )petos]. [An Assumed Declination: Ias, *Iados (whence Iades; *Iadikos), etc.]
 
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Greek island of Rhodes seeking to attract tourists during winter also!!

It might surprise the reader that in my first job in good ol'London town after leaving school in a package Holiday company Rhodes was a thriving winter destination together with Crete and Corfu and Epirotiki Lines were cruising around the Greek islands in the 70s....It always had been an alternative to cold weather conditions in winter months....the same as Spanish Islands..... Kalley Mera from Thailand and Monsoons raining heavily here!
https://www.tornosnews.gr/en/tornos...g-to-attract-tourists-during-winter-also.html

Tsambika beach is a beautiful sandy beach

I'm a big fan of peaches with fine sand, and clear water. If you are too then it's in Tsambika Beach is the place to go! There are many different options for organized beaches with chairs that you can pay for at Tsambika. Next to the beach is also a waterpark that you can visit and do many different activities and bring the kids. It's located on the eastern part of the island, near the Holy Monastery of the Virgin Mary. Enjoy!

Airport taxis

Hello everyone, Newby here, so please bare with me if this question has been asked before. I will be arriving in Rhodes on Friday evening, and wondering if its cheaper to prebook a taxi or just jump in a taxi at the airport, as not sure if there is a standard rate or not. Thanks

The best wineries to visit in Rhodes

I've done quite a bit of research about the different types of wines in Rhodes and what wineries produce the best wine. Of course, wine are always up to your personal taste and no one can truly tell you what is the best wine for you. The most popular and successful wineries in Rhodes are Alexandris Family Winery, Kounakis, Tatakis, Kounakis and Piperis. If you've been to any of these, please let me know how your experience was!

If you love history, Rhodes should be your next destination!

When many people think of travelling to Greece for history, they may think of Athens or Crete… but I'm here to tell you that Rhodes is one of the best places to visit if you love history. The island is full of mediaeval history and has some of the most beautiful and old mediaeval architecture in all of Greece. Some of the best places to explore this history are Ancient Kamiros, Palace of the Grand Master, and the archeological museum of Rhodes.
Share and discuss your Rhodes photos, questions and experiences!

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