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kosta_karapinotis

Active member
Some of the earliest examples of where Greek can be traced to is the Mycenaean civilization. Once the Mycenaean civilization collapsed, parts of the Greek language disappeared. It was then replaced by writing inspired by the Phoenicians. After this during the Classical Period of Ancient Greece, the language developed into several dialects, one of which developed into a language that is very similar to the modern Greek that we know today.
 
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amygdalE

Active member
Some of the earliest examples of where Greek can be traced to is the Mycenaean civilization. Once the Mycenaean civilization collapsed, parts of the Greek language disappeared. It was then replaced by writing inspired by the Phoenicians. After this during the Classical Period of Ancient Greece, the language developed into several dialects, one of which developed into a language that is very similar to the modern Greek that we know today.
Tracing a language to its geographical source is practically impossible, since a language is sonoric and, hence, ephimeral, and we may not assume that a language originated where its writing down originated. Anyway, it is good to know where and how its witing originated. Notation, the writing of sounds is a great human invention, which everbody keeps on attributing to the Phoenicians, especially by misinterpreting Herodotus. What he said was a hearsay report: some people said that what we call letters (grammata) were Phoenician -- not that they were invented by them [as others said afterwards]. Sorry, I cannot reproduce here a chapter [in a MS of mine] on the Greek alphabet. Only a few words: The script itself started in Dispilio. The Dispilio Tablet has a syllabary, not an alphabet, but some of its written syllables will be used as alphabetical letters, whether consonants or vowels; the Phoenician alphabet does not have vowels! //I presume that the syllables or words on the Dispilio Tablet were Doric, and that the differentiation of the Greek dialects took place before any Greek was written down. I don't know whether there was a mutation of an Ionic Heta sound into a Doric Alpha, or vice-versa, or a Theta into Z or TS.
www.hellenicaworld.com/Greece/LX/en/DispilioTablet.html
 
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k_tsoukalas

Administrator
I have always wanted to visit the ruins at Mycenae. This is the Age of Heroes, and when the civilization collapsed Ancient Greece was pushed into a dark age that took a while to rebound. Thank you for sharing this!
 

Information About Alexander the Great

I have always been fascinated by Alexander the Great. I have this sense that depending on how you look at what he did, you could see it differently.

Sure, he conquered and spread hellenism. But what about the place he conquered? How did they feel? I am guessing not very favorable towards him.

If found this documentary on YouTube created by the history channel. I thought I'd watch it. I found it interesting and wanted to share.

Documentary about Ancient Greece

I love to watch documentaries about Ancient Greece. I find a lot of content on YouTube but some of it was just created by users and I am not sure the credibility of the sources.

I watched this one recently and wanted to share - it is from the History Channel:

What is Oxi Day?

I am most knowledgeable about the cuisine of Greece. I love to cook, and I learned how to make traditional Greek foods from my family.

Food is what we discussed, talked about, and enjoyed together over the years.

We barely talk about history - so when I happened to learn about Ohi Day in passing by poking around some Greek sites, I was surprised it wasn't talked about in my household growing up.

I want to know more about Ohi Day and why we celebrate. Any advice as to where to start?

My Top Favorite Greek Philosophers

There are too many philosophers to count, but these are the ones I am studying at the moment. It's fascinating to me how influential the Greek philosophers are. Here's some things I am learning:

#1 Socrates

If philosophy had a poster boy, Socrates might very well be it. The father of Western philosophy, Socrates was a gadfly to Athenian society, questioning everything and Master to Plato. Known for the Socratic Method and his unflinching commitment to truth, Socrates' influence is immeasurable despite never having written a word.

#2 Plato

Rightly succeeding his mentor on this list, Plato's Academy saw him birth the first "university" of its kind. His unabashed idealism, immortal Forms, allegories like the Cave, and the pursuit of 'The Good' in moral philosophy set the stage for much intellectual discourse.

#3 Aristotle

Aristotle, another of Plato's students, had a more grounded approach to philosophy than his predecessor. With establishing principles of logic and reason, and contributions to virtually every field of academia, from poetry to physics, Aristotle's body of work remains foundational.

#4 Heraclitus

Heraclitus, famed for the idea that "change is the only constant," viewed the cosmos through a lens of process, flux, and an everlasting Logos that governs the world. Although little of his work survives, his influence on ancient and modern thinkers is profound.

#5 Epicurus

Known for his eponymous philosophy, Epicurus taught that the greatest good is to seek modest pleasures in order to attain a state of tranquility, freedom from fear (ataraxia), and absence of bodily pain (aponia). Often misunderstood, Epicureanism is starkly different from the modern use of 'epicurean' - it's much less about a luxury lifestyle and more about ethical considerations regarding personal fulfillment.

When is Ochi Day?

Is Ochi Day coming up? It's a federal holiday in Greece, right?

Does anyone have any resources?

I know that this was an important milestone in world history, and definitely in Greece, but I feel like we don't learn much about it outside of Greece.

Even though Greece was ultimately occupied by the Axis Powers, people around the world were inspired that Greece stood up to them and actually almost succeeded.

Powerful stuff.
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