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efhernandez_

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I always admired how Greek myths taught us so many lessons in life, enjoy :)

 
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This is a very fascinating story to me. Seems almost like a cautionary tale Ancient Greek parents would tell their kids! The takeaway for me? Don't let your ego get in the way ... How about you guys? What do you think it is about?
 

About My Favorite Greek Goddess Aphrodite

I have been researching Aphrodite, one of my favorite goddesses. I put this together based on my research.

Aphrodite was the goddess of love, beauty, and sexuality. She was regarded as the most beautiful and desired goddess in all of Greek mythology. (I think that might be why she fascinates me!)

Aphrodite's origin story is interesting. It's said that she was born from the sea foam created when the Titan Cronus cut off the genitals of his father Ouranos. She was the goddess of love, beauty, and sexuality, with her appearance at times described as pure beauty itself. She is often depicted with a flowing garment that barely covers her curves, and barefooted standing on a pedestal, highlighting her goddess-like beauty.

According to Greek legends, Aphrodite fell in love with many gods, mortals, and even animals, which often resulted in chaotic and tragic events. It is said that she helped cause the Trojan War by causing the love triangle between Paris, the Prince of Troy, and Helen, who was the wife of the Menelaus of Sparta. The story proved her power's influence and the chaos that follows her love.

Aphrodite was also a patron of love and marriage, and apparently married to the god Hephaestus, who fell in love with her beauty alongside all the Greek gods. This marriage was a politically motivated decision of Hera, whose husband Zeus had numerous affairs and that caused constant jealousy between their married life. Needless to say, Aphrodite was having none of it, with her notable lovers being Ares, Adonis, and Anchises.

Aphrodite's influence can be seen even today with countless works of art inspired by her beauty. That is why I love lear about her. She seemed to embody the feminine spirit.

goddess-aphrodite.jpg

Summary of the Nine Muses of Greek Mythology

I've been studying about Greek Mythology and I bumped into some information about the 9 muses. I thought I would give a summary of who they are and what they represented. I feel like the Muses are often forgotten!

In Greek mythology, the Muses were goddesses who presided over the arts and sciences, inspiring creativity and knowledge in humans. There were originally nine Muses, each with her own domain of expertise. Here's a summary of who they were:
  1. Calliope: The Muse of epic poetry and eloquence. She was often depicted with a writing tablet or a scroll.
  2. Clio: The Muse of history. She was often depicted holding a scroll or a set of tablets, symbolizing the recording of historical events.
  3. Euterpe: The Muse of music, song, and lyric poetry. She was often depicted holding a flute or a double flute.
  4. Thalia: The Muse of comedy and bucolic poetry. She was often depicted with a comic mask, a shepherd's crook, or a wreath of ivy.
  5. Melpomene: The Muse of tragedy. She was often depicted holding a tragic mask and a sword or club.
  6. Terpsichore: The Muse of dance and choral poetry. She was often depicted holding a lyre and dancing.
  7. Erato: The Muse of love poetry and lyric poetry. She was often depicted holding a lyre and a wreath of roses.
  8. Polyhymnia: The Muse of sacred poetry, hymns, and eloquence. She was often depicted in a pensive or meditative pose, sometimes holding a finger to her lips.
  9. Urania: The Muse of astronomy and astrology. She was often depicted holding a globe and a compass, symbolizing the study of celestial bodies and their movements.
Together, the Muses served as sources of inspiration for poets, musicians, artists, and scholars, guiding and nurturing creative endeavors in ancient Greek culture.

muses-greek-mythology.jpg

Sad and Interesting Story of Prometheus

I find the story of Prometheseus to be sad and interesting and I wanted to share. Yes, I like to study Greek mythology - I find it so fascinating!

Prometheus, a Titan in Greek mythology, occupies a unique space in the pantheon of myths due to his intelligence and his profound impact on human civilization. His tale is one marked by valor, insubordination, and enduring punishment, a narrative that has fascinated scholars and enthusiasts for ages.

Prometheus, whose name aptly means "forethought", was known for his wisdom and for being a champion of mankind. Unwilling to see humans suffer, he committed a daring act of defiance against Zeus, the king of the gods, which would forever alter the course of human history.

The most famous aspect of Prometheus’ story involves him stealing fire from the gods and gifting it to humanity. Fire, in Greek mythology, represents more than just a means to warm food or fend off the darkness; it symbolizes knowledge, technology, and enlightenment—tools that would empower humanity to shape their world, for better or worse.

Zeus, infuriated by Prometheus' transgression, sentenced him to a severe and enduring punishment. Prometheus was bound to a rock, where each day an eagle, the emblem of Zeus, was sent to eat his liver, which would then regrow overnight, only for the torment to repeat ad infinitum. It was an eternal punishment for a being who, in many accounts, acted out of compassion and foresight.

I find it sad that he did something so beneficial to humanity but then got punished for it.

Afterlife Beliefs in Greek Mythology?

What did Ancient Greeks believe about the afterlife? I've heard a few different stories... I'm particularly drawn to Ancient Greece's take on life after death.

Was there a uniform belief system, or did it vary significantly among different cities or periods? How did their beliefs influence their daily life and practices? I'm also curious about the role of mythological figures like Hades and the concept of Elysium.

If anyone has any expertise, recommended readings, or can point me to resources where I might be able to gather detailed insights into these spiritual aspects of Ancient Greek culture, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thesmorphia - Ancient Greek Thanksgiving Festival

I have heard this festival described as an "Ancient Greek Thanksgiving" so I thought I would look it up. Very interesting! I don't see the "Thanksgiving" connection (not the way we in the US think of it) but I thought it was interesting because it goes to show you that gratitude-related festivals are an ancient concept. And it is a harvest festival, just like our US Thanksgiving is...

Some information I have gathered:

The Thesmorphia festival was celebrated on the 11th of Pyanepsion, which corresponds to late October or early November in the modern Gregorian calendar. The festival was a three-day affair, and it was observed mainly by women. During the festival, women were not allowed to sleep with their husbands, and purification rituals were performed at the temples of Demeter and Persephone. On the first day, the first fruits of the harvest were offered to Demeter, and a feast was held in her honor. On the second day, a procession was held, and women walked around the fields carrying torches, symbolizing the power of Demeter. The third day was a joyous celebration, and the remnants of the feast were donated to the poor.

The Thesmorphia festival was significant for many reasons. Firstly, it celebrated the end of the harvesting season, and it was a time to give thanks for a good crop. The festival was also a time for women to come together, and it was an opportunity for them to assert their power and influence in the society. Women played a significant role in the festival, and they were responsible for the preparation of the feast and various other aspects of the festival.

The festival was also significant in terms of its religious and mythological significance. Demeter was the goddess of agriculture, and Persephone was her young daughter, who was kidnapped by Hades, the god of the underworld. The story of Persephone reflects the cycle of life, death, and resurrection. The festival of Thesmorphia was an opportunity to honor these two goddesses and their mythology, which highlighted the importance of the harvest and the cycle of life.

Another reason why the Thesmorphia festival was significant was that it was a time for the community to come together and celebrate. The feast was an opportunity to share food, drink, and stories and build camaraderie amongst members of the community. During the festival, people forgot their differences and came together to celebrate the bounty of the harvest.
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