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nm1999

Active member
This is such a beautiful myth. I remember reading it when I was a teen and it really got me into Greek mythology. I hope you enjoy it

 
This is a great video and the myth of the Golden Fleece in Greek mythology is one of our favorites as well!

Here is a bit more information about the Golden Fleece:



 
There are so many great stories in Greek mythology and this is one of th great ones. The video was a great find!
 

Sad and Interesting Story of Prometheus

I find the story of Prometheseus to be sad and interesting and I wanted to share. Yes, I like to study Greek mythology - I find it so fascinating!

Prometheus, a Titan in Greek mythology, occupies a unique space in the pantheon of myths due to his intelligence and his profound impact on human civilization. His tale is one marked by valor, insubordination, and enduring punishment, a narrative that has fascinated scholars and enthusiasts for ages.

Prometheus, whose name aptly means "forethought", was known for his wisdom and for being a champion of mankind. Unwilling to see humans suffer, he committed a daring act of defiance against Zeus, the king of the gods, which would forever alter the course of human history.

The most famous aspect of Prometheus’ story involves him stealing fire from the gods and gifting it to humanity. Fire, in Greek mythology, represents more than just a means to warm food or fend off the darkness; it symbolizes knowledge, technology, and enlightenment—tools that would empower humanity to shape their world, for better or worse.

Zeus, infuriated by Prometheus' transgression, sentenced him to a severe and enduring punishment. Prometheus was bound to a rock, where each day an eagle, the emblem of Zeus, was sent to eat his liver, which would then regrow overnight, only for the torment to repeat ad infinitum. It was an eternal punishment for a being who, in many accounts, acted out of compassion and foresight.

I find it sad that he did something so beneficial to humanity but then got punished for it.

Afterlife Beliefs in Greek Mythology?

What did Ancient Greeks believe about the afterlife? I've heard a few different stories... I'm particularly drawn to Ancient Greece's take on life after death.

Was there a uniform belief system, or did it vary significantly among different cities or periods? How did their beliefs influence their daily life and practices? I'm also curious about the role of mythological figures like Hades and the concept of Elysium.

If anyone has any expertise, recommended readings, or can point me to resources where I might be able to gather detailed insights into these spiritual aspects of Ancient Greek culture, I would greatly appreciate it.

Aphrodite - Greek Goddess of Love

Ahead of Valentine's Day, I thought I'd share some things that I thought were interesting about Aphrodite, the Greek Goddess of love:

1. Aphrodite Was Born from Sea Foam.
In Greek mythology, it's said that Aphrodite was born from the sea foam that formed when Cronus cut off Uranus's genitals and threw them into the ocean. As the spirit of desire and physical attraction, Aphrodite's birth story reflects the power of nature and the irresistible force of passion.

2. She Was Married to Hephaestus.
Despite her reputation as the goddess of love and beauty, Aphrodite had a less-than-romantic marriage with Hephaestus, the god of blacksmiths and volcanoes. Hephaestus was unattractive and had a limp, and Aphrodite had several affairs with other gods and mortals. To me, this seem like an unlikely match.

3. She Possessed a Magic Girdle.
To make herself even more desirable and seductive, Aphrodite had a magic girdle that could make anyone fall in love with her. It's said that she used this girdle to win the hearts of both gods and mortals and cause conflicts and jealousy among them.

4. She Had Children with Several Gods and Mortals.
Aphrodite was famous for her many love affairs, and she had children with several gods and mortals. Her most famous son was Eros, the god of love and passion, who was sometimes depicted as her lover as well.

5. She Was Worshiped throughout Ancient Greece.
As the goddess of love and beauty, Aphrodite was a popular deity throughout ancient Greece and was worshiped in many cities and temples. She was also associated with fertility, sexuality, and even war, as seen in her role as a protector of soldiers and sailor.

6. Her Symbols Included Doves, Roses, and Mirrors.
Like most deities, Aphrodite had several symbols that represented her qualities and powers. Her most common symbols were doves, roses, and mirrors, which reflected her beauty, love, and vanity.

Accurate movies about Greek mythology?

I am looking for some "accurate" movies that have Greek mythological topics. I say "accurate" because how can we really even know? Many of the stories were handed down through the generations, and some even may have been lost. I guess I mean accurate according to what has been established from works that have survived.

I found this video - has anyone watched these?

Different Gods and Goddesses in Different Parts of Greece?

I had thought that the pantheon of gods and goddesses was a standardized concept throughout Greece, but it appears as if that might be incorrect thinking on my part.

In learning about the different Greek islands and regions of Greece, I see that there might be regional myths, gods, and goddesses that might not be present in other parts of Greece.

I can't think of specific examples. I am just writing this post to confirm to you guys whether this is true or not... For example, I get the feeling that some of the stories on Crete may not have been part of the stories in other places in Greece - like the Minotaur - was that Crete specific?

Maybe there's no way to really know....?
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