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xmelissaa

Active member
I am planning a girls trip to Athens and there is a woman we are traveling with who absolutely LOVES exploring street food. So, I told her I would ask you guys for recommendations. I know to watch out for gyros, souvlaki, pita, street corn, chestnuts (I know the corn and chestnuts are seasonal and I don't quite know when we are visiting yet. It's a big group and a lot of moving parts lol).

I am looking for not only what to look out for in terms of food, but also if you have recommendations as to a location where they have the best. Thank you in advance!
 

PemiKanavos

Administrator
Staff member
One more greek street food you should definitely try is “Koulouri”. Koulouri is an iconic Greek snack. It’s individual bread rings that’s crispy on the out side and pillowy on a the inside. It’s generously covered with sesame seeds, with a sweet after taste. A must try for sure.
If staying in Athens center, you must visit the street aiolou. There are many different store as well as cafe and eateries. You should definitely try loukoumades. Two of my fav are, Krinos loukoumades (original store dating back to 1920) on aiolou st as well as Lukumades (abut more modern twist).
 
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xmelissaa

Active member
One more greek street food you should definitely try is “Koulouri”. Koulouri is an iconic Greek snack. It’s individual bread rings that’s crispy on the out side and pillowy on a the inside. It’s generously covered with sesame seeds, with a sweet after taste. A must try for sure.
If staying in Athens center, you must visit the street aiolou. There are many different store as well as cafe and eateries. You should definitely try loukoumades. Two of my fav are, Krinos loukoumades (original store dating back to 1920) on aiolou st as well as Lukumades (abut more modern twist).
I loooove koulouri. You're right, it's so iconic. Thanks for weighing in about where to go in Athens!
 

PemiKanavos

Administrator
Staff member

k_tsoukalas

Administrator
I agree about the koulouri, also I love, love the street corn! And of course, gyros are always a classic.
 

Greek pita bread?

I like to make gyros at home but I am having a heck of a time finding the right bread for it where I live.

There is a store near me but they haven't been getting the bread I normally use in.

I thought maybe I would make my own - but I am not the best bread maker. I also don't trust recipes I see.

I don't want it to be the wrong kind of bread. I want it to be soft. I guess I have two questions -

1. maybe I can buy the bread online? Do you know where? and 2. Do you have a recipe you can recommend?

Cooking Greek Style Octopus

One of the things I like about Greek cuisine is the octopus! It's so tender and flavorful. I get it a lot when I am in Greece and only a few times in the United States. I want to learn how to do that. In particular I want to know:
  • Choosing the Right Octopus: What should I look for when buying octopus? Are there any specific types or sizes that work best?
  • Tenderizing Process: I’ve heard that tenderizing the octopus is crucial. What methods do you recommend? I’ve heard of everything from beating it to simmering it in a pot. What works best?
  • Cooking Techniques: Should I grill it, bake it, or cook it in a stew? I'm aiming for something that's traditionally Greek.
  • Marination and Seasonings: What are the best herbs, spices, or marination techniques to use? I know olive oil and lemon are staples, but are there any other must-have seasonings?
Any advice you can give is welcome!

Baklava Crumble for Cheesecake

I know that this isn't a traditionally Greek dish, just Greek inspired, but we have fun with it in my family.

You take a regular cheesecake recipe (the kind you have to bake), prepare it, and set it aside while prepping the baklava part.

Brush the cheesecake pan with better. Line it with a few sheets of phyllo - I eyeball it - and then brush it with butter. You want Mayne 3-4 layers of phyllo but make sure the pan is covered.

Prepare the nut filling of 2 cups ground nuts, 1/2 cup sugar, and about a teaspoon or more of cinnamon (I eyeball it) in a bowl. Sprinkle over the phyllo. Pour the cheesecake filling over it, and bake the cheesecake as directed in the recipe.

When about to serve, prepare a simple syrup with honey, water, sugar, orange zest, and honey. You'll need about a cup of syrup.

baklava-cheesecake.jpg

Does this look like a good koliva recipe?

I am planning a memorial service coming up in about two weeks. The person who makes the koliva for everyone in the church is going to be out of town, and I can't find another person to do it. So I thought I'd make it.

I found this recipe - does it look like it would work?

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups whole wheat berries
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1/4 cup sesame seeds
  • 1/4 cup chopped almonds
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins
  • 1/4 cup black raisins
  • 2 tbsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp ground cloves
  • Garnish: pomegranate seeds, whole almonds, and powdered sugar

Instructions:

  1. Preparing the Wheat:
  • Rinse the wheat berries thoroughly in a strainer under cold running water.
  • Place the wheat in a large pot and add water until it's about 2 inches above the wheat level.
  • Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for about 2 hours, or until they are tender but not mushy, adding more water as necessary.
  • Drain the wheat and spread it out on a towel or a large baking tray to dry out completely, preferably overnight.
  1. Toasting Ingredients:
  • Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C).
  • Spread the sesame seeds on a baking sheet and toast in the oven for about 5-8 minutes, till golden; be vigilant as they can burn quickly.
  • Repeat this process with the almonds and the walnuts, ensuring each is nicely toasted but not burnt.
  1. Mixing the Koliva:
  • Once the wheat is dry, combine it in a large bowl with powdered sugar, toasted walnuts, toasted sesame seeds, toasted almonds, golden and black raisins, cinnamon, and cloves.
  • Stir the mixture gently to combine.
  1. Assembling the Dish:
  • Mound the mixture onto a large serving platter, shaping it into a dome with your hands or a spoon.
  • Decorate the top with whole almonds and pomegranate seeds creating a cross or other religious symbols as is traditional.
  • Just before serving, sift powdered sugar over the top to cover.

Learning about Greek wine

On a recent trip to the Peloponnese region, I had the pleasure of tasting a robust Agiorgitiko, which was a perfect companion to the local lamb dishes. I also visited the Domaine Skouras, a family-owned winery where the tradition has been passed down for generations – their Megas Oenos blend is to die for.

While I remain enchanted by the wines from this region, I'm just getting started. I've heard whispers of lesser-known grape varieties with complex profiles, such as Assyrtiko. Has anyone here had the opportunity to indulge in this rare find? Share with us your tasting notes!

For those looking to dive deeper into the world of Greek wine, there are some magnificent wine routes that weave through lush vineyards and offer a glimpse into the country's rich wine culture. The 'Wines of Crete' festival is also an upcoming event I have on my radar. It's a great opportunity to sample a diverse array of Cretan wines and perhaps even unearth a new favorite.

What Greek wines have beckoned to you? Any particular food pairings that brought out the best in them? Or perhaps you have a favorite vineyard that you would recommend visiting.
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