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nm1999

Active member
I had a delicious tiropitakia recently in Athens on the street and it was sooo good - better than other versions I have had. First of all, the phyllo was so crispy I don't know how they do it! It was also bigger than other ones I have had. When I make them at home I think I will make them bigger.

My question is, how did they get it so crispy? I always use butter but something was different about this. Could they be using a different type of butter? Are they mixing the butter with olive oil?

Then, there is a question of the cheeses. It wasn't Feta - it was creamier. They maybe put a little Feta in it, but the mixture was a lot creamier than I've had. What cheese could be responsible for this? It kind of had a mild, creamy goat cheese type of flavor. I also thought I tasted a touch of nutmeg.... I never thought of that.

Any thoughts you have on how I can recreate this are appreciated!
 

Rhea

New member
I had a delicious tiropitakia recently in Athens on the street and it was sooo good - better than other versions I have had. First of all, the phyllo was so crispy I don't know how they do it! It was also bigger than other ones I have had. When I make them at home I think I will make them bigger.

My question is, how did they get it so crispy? I always use butter but something was different about this. Could they be using a different type of butter? Are they mixing the butter with olive oil?

Then, there is a question of the cheeses. It wasn't Feta - it was creamier. They maybe put a little Feta in it, but the mixture was a lot creamier than I've had. What cheese could be responsible for this? It kind of had a mild, creamy goat cheese type of flavor. I also thought I tasted a touch of nutmeg.... I never thought of that.

Any thoughts you have on how I can recreate this are appreciated!
 

k_tsoukalas

Moderator
Tiropita is usually a combination of cheeses. I try to put something on the creamy side (like ricotta, cottage cheese, or even mascarpone), definitely feta, and something stronger tasting that you can grate - like Romano or Kefalotiri. I am sure there is a soft cheese equivalent in Greek cuisine but I have a hard time finding that kind of cheese here in the US. I wonder if, in Greece, they do something similar and make there's from a combination of cheeses?
 
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Luana

New member
I was taught anything made with phyllo dough needs unsalted butter. Not sure if this is what makes it more crispy. The combination of cheeses in the above post sounds terrific. I've never used mascarpone, though it sounds delicious.
 

Anyone have a good koulouri recipe?

Is making koulouri a simple matter of making a regular bread dough and then forming it into rings? I loooove koulouri when I go to Greece, and I am unfortunately not always able to get to Greece. I need a way to make this at home.

I love the type with the sesame seeds, and I also love the sweet ones. How do you make those? Can I make like a tsoureki but form it into instead?

What if I don't have Greek yogurt?

I don't always have Greek yogurt on hand. I tend not to keep it in the fridge and only buy it when I need it. I do, however, tend to have plain, regular yogurt.

Can I substitute that in recipes if I make something Greek at the last minute?

I have heard of some people straining it through cheesecloth. If you guys recommend I do that, How long does it need to strain?

Recipes list for Greek holiday cooking

I want to experiment making some traditional Greek dishes over the holidays. While I am learning how to cook Greek foods, I am also getting to know the culture. So, what do people typical cook during this time of year? I have done some research and made a quick list:

** There's a Greek "stuffing" type of thing that involves chestnuts to serve at Thanksgiving - I am having a tough time tracking down a recipe

** Melamakarona - the Greek Christmas cookie

** Other Greek desserts seem pretty common this time of year, too - baklava, koulourakia, kourabedies

** Braised lamb shank - Greeks in the United States, from what I can tell, tend to cook Turkey - but this lamb shank recipe has come up as an option for Christmas dinner

Did I miss anything? I was thinking of making the Melemakarona cookies, and maybe learning how to make lamb shake and that "stuffing" (if I can find the recipe). I will do some other things if I have time, but these are the main ones.

Moussaka Recipe from Cooking Greek Cookbook

One of my favorite Greek dishes is Moussaka, but I don't make it at home a lot. One of the issues is that I haven't found a great recipe, and I know that working with eggplant can be tricky. In the past, people have tried to explain to me how to make it, but their explanations have been confusing. I need a proper recipe that is easy to understand. It looks like Chef Pemi put together a great version of it that even someone like me, who has been intimidated by making my own moussaka, can follow. Not only that, but it looks yummy!

Check out the Cooking Greek Cookbook by Worldwide Greeks out on Hardcover, Paperback and eBook here!

moussaka-recipe.jpg

Melamakarona Recipe from Cooking Greek Cookbook

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