1 - 4 of 4 Posts

nm1999

Active member
I had a delicious tiropitakia recently in Athens on the street and it was sooo good - better than other versions I have had. First of all, the phyllo was so crispy I don't know how they do it! It was also bigger than other ones I have had. When I make them at home I think I will make them bigger.

My question is, how did they get it so crispy? I always use butter but something was different about this. Could they be using a different type of butter? Are they mixing the butter with olive oil?

Then, there is a question of the cheeses. It wasn't Feta - it was creamier. They maybe put a little Feta in it, but the mixture was a lot creamier than I've had. What cheese could be responsible for this? It kind of had a mild, creamy goat cheese type of flavor. I also thought I tasted a touch of nutmeg.... I never thought of that.

Any thoughts you have on how I can recreate this are appreciated!
 
I had a delicious tiropitakia recently in Athens on the street and it was sooo good - better than other versions I have had. First of all, the phyllo was so crispy I don't know how they do it! It was also bigger than other ones I have had. When I make them at home I think I will make them bigger.

My question is, how did they get it so crispy? I always use butter but something was different about this. Could they be using a different type of butter? Are they mixing the butter with olive oil?

Then, there is a question of the cheeses. It wasn't Feta - it was creamier. They maybe put a little Feta in it, but the mixture was a lot creamier than I've had. What cheese could be responsible for this? It kind of had a mild, creamy goat cheese type of flavor. I also thought I tasted a touch of nutmeg.... I never thought of that.

Any thoughts you have on how I can recreate this are appreciated!
 
Tiropita is usually a combination of cheeses. I try to put something on the creamy side (like ricotta, cottage cheese, or even mascarpone), definitely feta, and something stronger tasting that you can grate - like Romano or Kefalotiri. I am sure there is a soft cheese equivalent in Greek cuisine but I have a hard time finding that kind of cheese here in the US. I wonder if, in Greece, they do something similar and make there's from a combination of cheeses?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Luana
I was taught anything made with phyllo dough needs unsalted butter. Not sure if this is what makes it more crispy. The combination of cheeses in the above post sounds terrific. I've never used mascarpone, though it sounds delicious.
 

Greek Yogurt Pasta Recipe

I thought I would share a recipe for Greek yogurt pasta. I had it in a cafe in Greece once and have been making something similar ever since.

Ingredients

  • 8 oz (225g) pasta of your choice (e.g., penne, spaghetti, fusilli)
  • 1 cup (240g) Greek yogurt (plain, full-fat for creaminess)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 lemon (juice and zest)
  • 1/4 cup (30g) grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup (30g) crumbled feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) olive oil
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) pasta cooking water
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • Fresh parsley or basil leaves for garnish (optional)
  • Cherry tomatoes, halved (optional)
  • Baby spinach leaves (optional)
Instructions

Cook the Pasta
:

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the pasta and cook according to the package instructions until al dente.

Reserve 1/4 cup (60ml) of the pasta cooking water before draining the pasta.

Prepare the Sauce:

In a large mixing bowl, combine the Greek yogurt, minced garlic, lemon juice, and lemon zest. Mix well.

Add the grated Parmesan cheese, crumbled feta cheese, olive oil, dried oregano, and dried basil. Stir until well combined.

Combine Pasta and Sauce:

Add the cooked pasta to the bowl with the sauce. Toss to coat the pasta evenly.

If the sauce is too thick, gradually add the reserved pasta cooking water until you reach your desired consistency.

Season and Garnish:

Taste the pasta and season with salt and black pepper to your liking.

For an extra touch of freshness, toss in some halved cherry tomatoes and baby spinach leaves.

Garnish with fresh parsley or basil leaves, if desired.

Creative ideas for Easter lamb leftovers?

We cooked too much Easter lamb than we needed and have a ton leftover. I am sure I am not the only one! I am brainstorming ways to use the leftovers. Do you guys have anything to add?

1. Gyros with lamb (Tzatziki and all the trimmings!)
2. Lamb sandwiches
3. Stir fries
4. Lamb in rice and tomato sauce
5. Wraps
6. Omelets and scrambles (think steak and eggs, but with Greek flavors and of course lamb instead of steak)

grilled-lamb-chops.jpg

What foods go best with ouzo?

I am curious - what goods go best with Ouzo? Traditionally, I don't actually pay attention.

From my understanding, Ouzo is traditionally enjoyed with small plates, similar to tapas, known as "mezedes" in Greece. Yet, I’m eager to hear from those who have either traveled to Greece or have an in-depth knowledge of Greek cuisine about what specific dishes you think would pair best with Ouzo. Are there specific flavors or types of dishes (seafood, meats, vegetables) that enhance the experience of sipping Ouzo?

Top herbal teas popular in Greece?

Could anyone share insights or recommendations on which herbal teas are the most popular or cherished in Greece? I'm particularly interested in teas that are unique to the region or have a special place in Greek culture and wellness practices.

Also, if you have any suggestions on where I might purchase these teas, especially if they're available online, that would be incredibly helpful! I'm eager to try making some of these teas at home and experiencing a taste of Greek herbal tradition.

Thank you in advance for your help! I’m looking forward to exploring your suggestions and hopefully discovering some new favorite teas.

Greek Marinated Olives Recipe

I love to serve marinated Greek olives when I have people over. It's easy to do, and I change things each time. The amounts are for a big serving enough for company. I halve the recipe otherwise.
  • 2 cups mixed Greek olives (such as Kalamata, green, or black)
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes (optional)
  • Lemon zest (optional)
  • Fresh herbs for garnish (such as parsley or basil)
Instructions:
  1. Prepare the olives: Rinse the olives under cold water to remove excess brine. If the olives are very salty, you can soak them in cold water for about 30 minutes, then drain.
  2. Combine ingredients: In a bowl, combine the olives, sliced garlic, extra virgin olive oil, red wine vinegar, dried oregano, dried thyme, dried rosemary, and red pepper flakes if using. Gently toss to coat the olives evenly with the marinade.
  3. Marinate: Cover the bowl with plastic wrap or transfer the olives and marinade to a sealable container. Let the olives marinate in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours, or preferably overnight, to allow the flavors to meld together.
  4. Serve: Before serving, let the olives come to room temperature to allow the flavors to fully develop. Optionally, garnish with lemon zest and fresh herbs for extra freshness and aroma.
Sign up for a free account and share your thoughts, photos, questions about Greek food, travel and culture!

WorldwideGreeks.com is a free online forum community where people can discuss Greek food, travel, traditions, history and mythology.
Join Worldwide Greeks here!

JOIN COMMUNITY FOR FREE

LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT
Back
Top