1 - 2 of 2 Posts

redsoxdw_

Active member
I am so excited to see this movie! It beautifully depicts the crisis of Smyrna, and shows the lives of those that were affected by the genocide. Let me know what you think of this trailer, and if you're thinking to watch it as well. I'm currently trying to find a link for the full movie online, but having some trouble.

 
I can tell this is going to be emotionally. This is where one side of my family came from. I love how someone made a film about this. I have felt that this piece of history is in danger of being lost.
 

Learning about Greek Independence Day

March 25th marks a significant celebration in Greece, but I realize my knowledge on its historical context is quite limited.

From what I understand, this day commemorates the start of the War of Greek Independence in 1821, where Greece sought to end several centuries of Ottoman rule. However, I'm eager to learn more about the intricacies of this period, the key figures involved, and how the struggle for independence unfolded over time.

Additionally, I'd be interested in understanding how this day is celebrated across Greece today and whether any particular traditions are tied to it. For example, are there specific ceremonies, parades, or family traditions that uniquely mark this day in Greek culture?


Greek-flag.jpg

Greek Independence Day History

Greek Independence Day is coming up! I thought I would share a bit that I know about the history. Please chime in with corrections or anything to add!
  1. The Spark of Revolution: Greek Independence Day marks the day in 1821 when the Greeks began their revolt against the Ottoman Empire, a state that had controlled Greece for nearly 400 years. This revolt was influenced by the surge of nationalism throughout Europe and inspired by the Enlightenment ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity.
  2. A Poet’s Declaration: The revolution officially began after Bishop Germanos of Patras raised the Greek flag at the Monastery of Agia Lavra in Peloponnese, symbolizing the call to arms. However, it was rumored that the war of independence was actually declared a few days earlier by Alexandros Ypsilantis, a Greek national hero, in the Danubian Principalities.
  3. International Support: The Greek fight for independence was not just a local effort; it garnered substantial international support from prominent figures such as Lord Byron from Britain, who notably spent his own money and later died in Greece, contributing to the Greek cause. This international backing was crucial for the morale of the Greek fighters and helped in diplomatic efforts later on.
  4. The Battle of Navarino: A pivotal point in the Greek War of Independence was the Battle of Navarino in 1827, where the combined fleets of Britain, France, and Russia defeated the Ottoman and Egyptian fleets. This naval battle marked a significant turning point that led to the eventual independence of Greece.
  5. Recognition and Autonomy: Greek Independence was formally recognized in 1830 by the Treaty of London. However, full sovereignty and the delineation of the Greek borders were not achieved until later. It allowed the foundation of the modern Greek state, under the governance of King Otto from Bavaria.

What did the Ancient Greeks eat?

I am fascinated by the Ancient Greeks. I have a feeling that some of our modern Greek recipes are similar to the ancient ones. Like spoon sweets. It think that seems like something that was developed a long time ago as a way to preserve the fruit harvest.

So, I have been researching this. What did the Ancient Greeks eat? I wanted to share this video because I thought it was interesting.

Story of the Birth of Democracy

I just watched a nice documentary about the birth of democracy in Athens. This is so fascinating! I didn't realize the nuances, only the basics about how it began in Athens. This documentary goes into a lot more detail.

Studying the Trojan War - Was it Real?

Did the Trojan War really happen? I am doing a bit of research and wanted to know what you guys thought:

The war is believed to have happened around 1200 BCE, and while there is no concrete evidence to support its occurrence, it is widely accepted as factual.

What is confusing me is how prevalent it is in Greek Mythology. In addition to the gods' involvement in the conflict, various stories and legends were added over time to give the tale more depth and drama. For example, the character of Achilles was said to be invulnerable except for his heel, which led to the phrase "Achilles heel" being used to describe a person's one weakness.

While some scholars once dismissed the Trojan War as pure myth, modern archaeological evidence has suggested that it may have been a real event. Excavations at the ancient site of Troy have revealed evidence of a long period of conflict and destruction, and historians have found similarities between the tale as it is told in ancient texts and what is known about the region's history at the time. While many details of the Trojan War are still shrouded in mystery, it seems increasingly likely that it was not just a legend but a real event that has been passed down through the ages.
Share and discuss Greek history!

WorldwideGreeks.com is a free online forum community where people can discuss Greek food, travel, traditions, history and mythology.
Join Worldwide Greeks here!

JOIN COMMUNITY FOR FREE

LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT
Back
Top