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paharo45

Active member
I've been delving into Greek mythology recently, and one aspect that continually piques my interest is the jealousy of Hera, the queen of the gods. Hera's jealousy, particularly towards Zeus's numerous affairs and their resulting offspring, is a recurring theme in many myths.

I'm curious to hear your thoughts and interpretations on this. Why do you think Hera's jealousy is so prominently featured in these stories? Is it meant to reflect certain human qualities or societal norms of the time? Or is there another symbolic reason behind it?

Additionally, how do you think Hera's jealousy shapes her interactions with other characters and the overall narrative of Greek myths? Does it add a layer of complexity to her character, or does it serve more as a plot device?
 

About Theogony by Hesiod

This poem has been one of my favorites for a while. I think everyone interested in Greek Mythology should read it! I thought I'd give you a summary:

Hesiod begins by invoking the Muses to guide him in recounting the story of the origins of the gods. He describes Chaos as the initial void from which the first gods emerged. From Chaos came Gaia (Earth), Tartarus (the Underworld), and Eros (Love), setting the stage for the creation of the cosmos.

Gaia gives birth to Uranus (the Sky), who becomes her husband and the father of the Titans, Cyclopes, and Hecatoncheires (Hundred-Handed Ones). Uranus, fearing the power of his offspring, imprisons them within Gaia's womb. Gaia urges her children to rebel, and her Titan son Cronus castrates Uranus, seizing power for himself.

Cronus becomes the ruler of the cosmos but fears a prophecy that one of his children will overthrow him. To prevent this, he swallows each of his children upon their birth, except for Zeus, who is saved by his mother Rhea and hidden away. Zeus grows up and defeats Cronus, establishing himself as the king of the gods.

The poem then describes the Titanomachy, the epic battle between Zeus and the Titans, which ends with the Titans' defeat and their imprisonment in Tartarus. Zeus and his siblings, the Olympian gods, become the rulers of the cosmos.

The narrative continues with the story of the Gigantomachy, the battle between the gods and the Giants, and other myths surrounding the gods' interactions with mortals and each other.

Sad and Interesting Story of Prometheus

I find the story of Prometheseus to be sad and interesting and I wanted to share. Yes, I like to study Greek mythology - I find it so fascinating!

Prometheus, a Titan in Greek mythology, occupies a unique space in the pantheon of myths due to his intelligence and his profound impact on human civilization. His tale is one marked by valor, insubordination, and enduring punishment, a narrative that has fascinated scholars and enthusiasts for ages.

Prometheus, whose name aptly means "forethought", was known for his wisdom and for being a champion of mankind. Unwilling to see humans suffer, he committed a daring act of defiance against Zeus, the king of the gods, which would forever alter the course of human history.

The most famous aspect of Prometheus’ story involves him stealing fire from the gods and gifting it to humanity. Fire, in Greek mythology, represents more than just a means to warm food or fend off the darkness; it symbolizes knowledge, technology, and enlightenment—tools that would empower humanity to shape their world, for better or worse.

Zeus, infuriated by Prometheus' transgression, sentenced him to a severe and enduring punishment. Prometheus was bound to a rock, where each day an eagle, the emblem of Zeus, was sent to eat his liver, which would then regrow overnight, only for the torment to repeat ad infinitum. It was an eternal punishment for a being who, in many accounts, acted out of compassion and foresight.

I find it sad that he did something so beneficial to humanity but then got punished for it.

Understanding the Goddess Hera's Jealousy

I've been delving into Greek mythology recently, and one aspect that continually piques my interest is the jealousy of Hera, the queen of the gods. Hera's jealousy, particularly towards Zeus's numerous affairs and their resulting offspring, is a recurring theme in many myths.

I'm curious to hear your thoughts and interpretations on this. Why do you think Hera's jealousy is so prominently featured in these stories? Is it meant to reflect certain human qualities or societal norms of the time? Or is there another symbolic reason behind it?

Additionally, how do you think Hera's jealousy shapes her interactions with other characters and the overall narrative of Greek myths? Does it add a layer of complexity to her character, or does it serve more as a plot device?

List of fun Greek mythology topics

I really love Greek Mythology. I thought I would share with you all some of my favorite topics:

  1. Birth of the Olympians and how they came to power
  2. Different heroes of Greek mythology
  3. 12 Labors of Hercules
  4. Trojan War
  5. Iliad and the Odyssey and all the stories in them
  6. The story of Persephone
  7. Pandora's box
  8. Different creatures - like the Minotaur and Hydra
What are yours?

Was the Trojan War real?

I have been wondering, was the Trojan War real? I decided to explore the topic. I still don't know. What do you guys think?

Let's start with the basics. According to ancient Greek mythology, the Trojan War was fought between the Greeks and the Trojans over Helen of Troy. Helen, the wife of King Menelaus, was said to be the most beautiful woman in the world. When she was kidnapped by Paris of Troy, her husband called upon the Greek army to help him get her back. The war lasted ten years, according to the myth, and ended with the Greeks claiming victory when they used a wooden horse to get inside the walls of Troy.

It's easy to dismiss this story as nothing more than a legend, but there is some archaeological evidence that suggests that there may be some truth to the tale. In the 1870s, a German businessman named Heinrich Schliemann claimed to have found the site of ancient Troy in modern-day Turkey. He found evidence of a walled city with multiple layers of ruins, which might have been the result of multiple attacks over time. Whether or not this was the site of the Trojan War is still up for debate, but it's clear that Schliemann believed that he had discovered the home of king Priam and the legendary Trojan horse.

That said, not everyone agrees with Schliemann's findings. In fact, some scholars argue that the city he found wasn't actually Troy at all, but another nearby city with a similar name. Others point out that the ruins he found don't quite match up with the descriptions of the city in the Iliad. Additionally, there is evidence that suggests that the Trojan War didn't happen exactly as it was told in the myth. For example, it's possible that the conflict arose over economic disputes rather than the kidnapping of Helen.

Despite the disagreements among scholars, one thing is for sure: The Trojan War has had a lasting impact on culture and has become one of the most well-known stories from Greek mythology. It has been retold in countless books, movies, and TV shows over the years, and the characters from the story continue to inspire us today. The Trojan hero Hector, for example, has become synonymous with bravery, while Odysseus's journey home has been the inspiration for many other epic tales.
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