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tomipark

Active member
Please let me know!!! Feel free to debate in the comments I know there are a lot of
possibilities.
 
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Worldwide Greeks Editor

Administrator
Staff member
Here are some of my favorite Greek mezze (appetizers):

- Saganaki
- Dolmades
- Tiropita

Here are some other Greek mezze recipes to consider trying:

 

Hash

Well-known member
Please let me know!!! Feel free to debate in the comments I know there are a lot of
possibilities.
Gigatez,Fava,fasolia,Bamiesz,
Melitzanosalada,Taramosalata,...More later!👌
 

Stathi

New member
Please let me know!!! Feel free to debate in the comments I know there are a lot of
possibilities.
Oh my God, there is such a huge variety of delicious & irrisitable mezedes , both panhellenic and regional. For example, in Rhodes they make "pitaroudia." They are like little, irregular circles of very coarsely ground, whole, cooked chick peas with flour, spices & local herbs, gently & quikly fried in shallow olive oil at a medium temp. They require some know how skill to make. I never attempted because I could eat them inexpensively at the various tavernas and resturants throughout the island. They would vary slightly from place to place but they were always so delicious & delectable & great with tzadzitki. The first time I eat them was at the Panorama Taverna on the highway close to the Tzambika Monestary, Archangelou. In retrospect I think those were my favorites so far, There are no eggs in pitaroudia and can be considered vegetarian. If one could back they they could also be eaten during strict lent, which very few ever practice any more
 
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greggd12

Active member
Oh my God, there is such a huge variety of delicious & irrisitable mezedes , both panhellenic and regional. For example, in Rhodes they make "pitaroudia." They are like little, irregular circles of very coarsely ground, whole, cooked chick peas with flour, spices & local herbs, gently & quikly fried in shallow olive oil at a medium temp. They require some know how skill to make. I never attempted because I could eat them inexpensively at the various tavernas and resturants throughout the island. They would vary slightly from place to place but they were always so delicious & delectable & great with tzadzitki. The first time I eat them was at the Panorama Taverna on the highway close to the Tzambika Monestary, Archangelou. In retrospect I think those were my favorites so far, There are no eggs in pitaroudia and can be considered vegetarian. If one could back they they could also be eaten during strict lent, which very few ever practice any more
I found this recipe online and they look amazing! I've never heard of this dish and I'm so excited to try it. I'm a really big fan of regional dishes that usually get lost in the popular Greek food that we eat in the states. https://www.dianekochilas.com/pitaroudia-chickpea-fritters-with-tahini-sauce/
 

k_tsoukalas

Administrator
Fries made in olive oil, fava dip (puree of fava beans with herbs, garlic, etc), Skordalia dip, dolmades, tiropita, taramasalata ... I could go on and on but these are some of my favorites.
 
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Greek Cabbage Salad Recipe

I have been making a lot of Greek cabbage salad. I thought I'd share my recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium head of green cabbage, thinly shredded
  • 1 large carrot, grated
  • 1 cucumber, halved lengthwise, seeds removed, and thinly sliced
  • 1 small red onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1/2 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and halved
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, finely chopped
For the Dressing:
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Instructions:
  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the shredded cabbage, grated carrot, sliced cucumber, red onion, cherry tomatoes, Kalamata olives, and parsley. Toss gently to mix.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper.
  3. Pour the dressing over the salad and toss to coat all the ingredients evenly.
  4. Let the salad sit for at least 10-15 minutes to allow the flavors to meld.
  5. Adjust seasoning with more salt and pepper, if needed.
  6. Serve in a large salad bowl or on individual plates and enjoy this refreshing and zesty Greek cabbage salad.

What are your favorite Greek olives?

I love Kalamata olives but I am trying to branch out to different ones. Which Greek olives do you like best? I did some research about the different types:

Kalamata Olives: Perhaps the most renowned Greek olives, Kalamatas, are recognized by their dark purple color and almond shape. They are often preserved in wine vinegar or olive oil, which further accentuates their rich and fruity flavor.

Halkidiki Olives: These are large, pale green olives from the Halkidiki region of Northern Greece. Known for their crisp flesh and slightly peppery taste, Halkidiki olives are commonly stuffed with various fillings, from feta cheese to almonds, making them a good choice for appetizers.

Amfissa Olives: Cultivated primarily in Central Greece, near the ancient oracle of Delphi, Amfissa olives can range in color from green to black, depending on their ripeness. They have a mild, slightly sweet flavor and a meaty texture.

Throumba Olives: Unique to the island of Thassos, these olives are naturally sun-dried on the tree. They have a wrinkled appearance and a savory taste with a hint of vinegar, due to their natural fermentation.

I have never had any of these olives other than Kalamata and I am sure there are others, too.

greek-olives.jpg

Does this look like a good koliva recipe?

I am planning a memorial service coming up in about two weeks. The person who makes the koliva for everyone in the church is going to be out of town, and I can't find another person to do it. So I thought I'd make it.

I found this recipe - does it look like it would work?

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups whole wheat berries
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1/4 cup sesame seeds
  • 1/4 cup chopped almonds
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins
  • 1/4 cup black raisins
  • 2 tbsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp ground cloves
  • Garnish: pomegranate seeds, whole almonds, and powdered sugar

Instructions:

  1. Preparing the Wheat:
  • Rinse the wheat berries thoroughly in a strainer under cold running water.
  • Place the wheat in a large pot and add water until it's about 2 inches above the wheat level.
  • Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for about 2 hours, or until they are tender but not mushy, adding more water as necessary.
  • Drain the wheat and spread it out on a towel or a large baking tray to dry out completely, preferably overnight.
  1. Toasting Ingredients:
  • Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C).
  • Spread the sesame seeds on a baking sheet and toast in the oven for about 5-8 minutes, till golden; be vigilant as they can burn quickly.
  • Repeat this process with the almonds and the walnuts, ensuring each is nicely toasted but not burnt.
  1. Mixing the Koliva:
  • Once the wheat is dry, combine it in a large bowl with powdered sugar, toasted walnuts, toasted sesame seeds, toasted almonds, golden and black raisins, cinnamon, and cloves.
  • Stir the mixture gently to combine.
  1. Assembling the Dish:
  • Mound the mixture onto a large serving platter, shaping it into a dome with your hands or a spoon.
  • Decorate the top with whole almonds and pomegranate seeds creating a cross or other religious symbols as is traditional.
  • Just before serving, sift powdered sugar over the top to cover.

Using Greek Manouri Cheese I Found

I tried Manouri cheese for the first time after finding it at a local Greek store.

For those who aren't familiar, manouri is a semisoft, fresh white whey cheese made in Greece from goat or sheep milk. It's got this incredibly creamy texture with a hint of tanginess that pairs beautifully with honey or preserved fruits.

Have any of you tried it? And if so, what are your favorite ways to enjoy it? I've had it crumbled over a Greek salad, and it was delightful, but I'm on the hunt for more suggestions. I tried it in Tiropita, too, and it gave the filling an interesting flavor. I liked it. What else can I do?

Traditions associated with Greek coffee?

When I visit people in Greece, it usually involves Greek coffee, a cold glass of water, and whatever sweets there are around - like Loukoumi, spoon sweets, fruit.. it seems like it's all about hospitality and spending time together, while sharing the bounty of what you have.

One time, a yiayia actually did a "reading" using coffee grounds. I didn't understand all the Greek, but the reading was fun and lighthearted and I wondered how she decided what to say.

Do you guys have similar experiences? The social aspect has been a big part of it for me.
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