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blopez34

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What can I do at the cyclopean walls site? Does anyone know if there are tour guides? I would love to learn more about the walls from an expert
 

Worldwide Greeks Editor

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dimi_pat

Active member
The most famous examples of Cyclopean masonry are found in the walls of Mycenae and Tiryns! You should definitely visit
 
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k_tsoukalas

Moderator
Fun fact - these walls got their name in Ancient Greeks because some believed that the "Cyclops" (the one-eyed giants from Greek mythology) built them. Regardless of who you believe built them, they really are interesting to visit.
 

amygdalE

Member
The most famous examples of Cyclopean masonry are found in the walls of Mycenae and Tiryns! You should definitely visit
I agree. However, I think that this type of masonry (now also called Megalithic) was misnamed, because the wall that a cyclope, Polyphemus (in the Odyssey) built consisted of accumulated stones between trees. (This is intercalary m., which we evince as the walls between some columns of temples, while other columns are "free-standing". // Megalithic masonry is found also and in Italy and on the American continent (Peru`, etc.) Examples in southern Italy: Alatri, where some stones have carved words that use classical Greek and Etruscan alphabetical letters; Campana (in Calabria, near my native town), which contains the megalithic statue of an elephant. // I think megalithic constructions are prehistoric, from an era before our B.C. era. {We need a new "androgony".}
 

kosta_karapinotis

Active member
I agree. However, I think that this type of masonry (now also called Megalithic) was misnamed, because the wall that a cyclope, Polyphemus (in the Odyssey) built consisted of accumulated stones between trees. (This is intercalary m., which we evince as the walls between some columns of temples, while other columns are "free-standing". // Megalithic masonry is found also and in Italy and on the American continent (Peru`, etc.) Examples in southern Italy: Alatri, where some stones have carved words that use classical Greek and Etruscan alphabetical letters; Campana (in Calabria, near my native town), which contains the megalithic statue of an elephant. // I think megalithic constructions are prehistoric, from an era before our B.C. era. {We need a new "androgony".}
Wow so interesting! How do you know all of this?
 

amygdalE

Member
Wow so interesting! How do you know all of this?
Long ago, while still in high school, I read and analyzed the Odyssey in translation. After reading a book about Odysseus' homecoming journey, I prepared an article, which I still have, on the same subject but, as I think, with a more accurate geography, and I identified Cephallonia/Kephalonia as his homeland -- which I mentioned to a Greek colleague of mine in a Staten Island, NY, college. // One among my many private studies has been anthropology, especially cultural, and now I have come to the point where I see the need of a new/adequate Androgony or Anthropogony -- words I coin after Hesiod's Theogony [Theogoneia], wherefore they mean "the generation or genealogy of men" . It has to include the Age of megaliths, which exist in Greece, Italy, Peru`, Japan, etc.
Cheers. // I see a thread about Mount Ainos in Kefalonia... Is the mount frightening?? [I'll look for pictures] Do you have any idea as to when it was named thus? What does it mean to the Kefalonians?


=Wow so interesting! How do you know all of this?
 
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nadellii

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Long ago, while still in high school, I read and analyzed the Odyssey in translation. After reading a book about Odysseus' homecoming journey, I prepared an article, which I still have, on the same subject but, as I think, with a more accurate geography, and I identified Cephallonia/Kephalonia as his homeland -- which I mentioned to a Greek colleague of mine in a Staten Island, NY, college. // One among my many private studies has been anthropology, especially cultural, and now I have come to the point where I see the need of a new/adequate Androgony or Anthropogony -- words I coin after Hesiod's Theogony [Theogoneia], wherefore they mean "the generation or genealogy of men" . It has to include the Age of megaliths, which exist in Greece, Italy, Peru`, Japan, etc.
Cheers.
That’s amazing, do you feel like cultural anthropology does an accurate representation of other cultures? I’ve heard a lot of debate
 

amygdalE

Member
That’s amazing, do you feel like cultural anthropology does an accurate representation of other cultures? I’ve heard a lot of debate
As you know, what we call "anthropology" (rather than Philosophy of man) was originally concerned with primitive cultures. Unfortunately, I have not checked lately whether an anthropology book or encyclopaedia deals with all world cultures, or, to be sure, whether it contains a a satisfactory anthropogony; I have been busy doing etymologies of indo-european and some other languages. My yesterday finding: "Ainu", the name of one aboriginal Japanese people (before hybridations with the Chinese), is likely based on the classical Greek word "Ainos", which means "terrible, frightening" according to the Bailly grec-francais dictionnaire. (A lady has written an article with correspondances between Jap. and Greek words.) These are new works in cultural anthropology. //Interested?Search, as the URL does not work:
Japanese Concordances with Indo-European (IE) Languages-Knosos
 
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nadellii

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As you know, what we call "anthropology" (rather than Philosophy of man) was originally concerned with primitive cultures. Unfortunately, I have not checked lately whether an anthropology book or encyclopaedia deals with all world cultures, or, to be sure, whether it contains a a satisfactory anthropogony; I have been busy doing etymologies of indo-european and some other languages. My yesterday finding: "Ainu", the name of one aboriginal Japanese people (before hybridations with the Chinese), is likely based on the classical Greek word "Ainos", which means "terrible, frightening" according to the Bailly grec-francais dictionnaire. (A lady has written an article with correspondances between Jap. and Greek words.) These are new works in cultural anthropology. //Interested?Search, as the URL does not work:
Japanese Concordances with Indo-European (IE) Languages-Knosos
Hmmm...that was the debate I've come across, about anthropology focusing on "primitive cultures" and how its a negative perspective. I never expected that a Japanese word could have Greek origins, I am shocked. Thanks
 

The Iakovatios library and museum in Kefalonia

This museum and library has so much history. I would love to hear personal reviews if anyone has been. It is housed in an old mansion that was owned by the Typaldi-Iakovatios family. It is one of those places that survived after the massive earthquake that hit the island. However, it did sustain some damage during it. The mansion was restored in 1984 and is now home to a vast collection of books (around 20,000) and other collectibles.

Be an eco tourist in Kefalonia!

Eco tourism is something that always intrigued me but I didn't know it was super possible in Greece, happy that this person shared some tips in this video

How can I avoid the crowds in Kefalonia?

I don't really want to get caught up in the touristy areas...where should I avoid in Kefalonia?

Is Kefalonia expensive in comparison to other Greek islands?

What are the prices like of hotels, food, and experiences? Is it affordable?
Share and discuss your Kefalonia photos, questions and experiences!

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