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efhernandez_

Active member
I'm going to a Greek wedding very soon and I definitely need to learn a couple of moves. I know that there are so many group dances, and it's pretty much impossible that I'll be able to learn all of them. So I think that it's a good idea that I learn at least one classic dance that will definitely be danced at this Greek wedding. I know that both families are from Crete, so I'm not sure how that affects which dances people will be dancing. Any expert advice is greatly appreciated! This is my first Greek wedding!
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Well-known member
That depends on where the family is from, because that will determine the main style of dance. I went to a party from Crete once and it was nothing but Kritika (Cretan dances)... no nisiotika (dances from the other islands), no ipirotika (dances from Epirus), no piliotika (dances from Pilios), etc... If the family still acts very Greek, then this is would I would expect - only kritika. If they are Greek-American/Australian/Canadian/etc.. then you can probably expect a mixture of other dances such as tsamiko, kalamatiano, zeibekiko, and some kritika

You could always message the couple and ask what dances there will be so you can learn before the wedding.
 
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nadellii

Active member
That depends on where the family is from, because that will determine the main style of dance. I went to a party from Crete once and it was nothing but Kritika (Cretan dances)... no nisiotika (dances from the other islands), no ipirotika (dances from Epirus), no piliotika (dances from Pilios), etc... If the family still acts very Greek, then this is would I would expect - only kritika. If they are Greek-American/Australian/Canadian/etc.. then you can probably expect a mixture of other dances such as tsamiko, kalamatiano, zeibekiko, and some kritika

You could always message the couple and ask what dances there will be so you can learn before the wedding.
I would recommend pentozali, it’s one of the most popular Cretan dances.
 
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Jawge

New member
I'm going to a Greek wedding very soon and I definitely need to learn a couple of moves. I know that there are so many group dances, and it's pretty much impossible that I'll be able to learn all of them. So I think that it's a good idea that I learn at least one classic dance that will definitely be danced at this Greek wedding. I know that both families are from Crete, so I'm not sure how that affects which dances people will be dancing. Any expert advice is greatly appreciated! This is my first Greek wedding!
I'm going to a Greek wedding very soon and I definitely need to learn a couple of moves. I know that there are so many group dances, and it's pretty much impossible that I'll be able to learn all of them. So I think that it's a good idea that I learn at least one classic dance that will definitely be danced at this Greek wedding. I know that both families are from Crete, so I'm not sure how that affects which dances people will be dancing. Any expert advice is greatly appreciated! This is my first Greek wedding!
I'm going to a Greek wedding very soon and I definitely need to learn a couple of moves. I know that there are so many group dances, and it's pretty much impossible that I'll be able to learn all of them. So I think that it's a good idea that I learn at least one classic dance that will definitely be danced at this Greek wedding. I know that both families are from Crete, so I'm not sure how that affects which dances people will be dancing. Any expert advice is greatly appreciated! This is my first Greek wedding!
I think the syrto is a good start.
 
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lalajess

Member
I would learn the Syrto. The traditional bride song is a Syrto (this song):

 
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Patisqua

Member
Sousta. Most islands and providebces have there own version. Usually 2 steps forward, 3 steps back. Kastellorizians ven have a "wedding song" for the sousta - Mana hara. Patisqua
 
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francescool

Active member

k_tsoukalas

Moderator
I think a good place to start, as well, is to ask the couple which songs will be playing, or which dances they usually dance, so that you can dance the right dances in advance. I mean, there are thousands of dances in Greece and it all depends on where they're from...
 

Sandyrigo

New member
I'm going to a Greek wedding very soon and I definitely need to learn a couple of moves. I know that there are so many group dances, and it's pretty much impossible that I'll be able to learn all of them. So I think that it's a good idea that I learn at least one classic dance that will definitely be danced at this Greek wedding. I know that both families are from Crete, so I'm not sure how that affects which dances people will be dancing. Any expert advice is greatly appreciated! This is my first Greek wedding!
The most popular in the US is Kalamatiano. When my daughter got married in the G.O.C in Chicago, many in the wedding party and on the grooms side were not familiar with Greek traditions. She decided to have a casual rehearsal dinner in the church gym with the bridal party, their significant others and the grooms close family that were traveling in from out of town. After the dinner, she and her closest Greek friends gave everyone dance lessons. The wedding for both the Greeks and and non-Greeks was a blast.
 
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How formal are Greek weddings usually?

I'm going to a Greek wedding this summer as someone's plus one, and I really have no idea how to dress for the wedding. My date isn't really giving me a lot of advice, and she doesn't usually go to a lot of Greek weddings herself, so I'm a bit clueless. If anyone could give me advice on how formal Greek weddings usually are, I would really appreciate it.

When everyone has the same name, you gotta have some nicknames!

In Greece, many many people will have the same names. It is common to meet 4 Yannis, Yorgos, Konstantinas, and Marias in one day! Because of this, and because Greeks are affectionate, we like to have many nicknames for the ones we love. Check out this video which hilariously shows all of the different nicknames (serious and silly) that Greek people will call each other.

Koufeta or boubounieres are the most popular Greek wedding favors

Koufeta which are also called boubounieres are Greek wedding and baptism favors. They are usually nuts covered in chocolate and wrapped in soul with a ribbon. The candies are usually white or pastel colored. They are handed out as a favour at the end of the wedding or baptism, and as a way to say thank you or remember the wedding or baptism. I see more and more families being a bit more creative with their favorites. Last year I went to a wedding where a small jars of honey or hand it out, it was very neat.

What to do when you’re invited to a Greek persons house

For those who aren’t Greek, there is a lot of etiquette that goes behind visiting peoples houses. First off, it is considered very normal to invite someone over to your house. You don’t need to know them very well, and it is considered a kind gesture. When you get invited to someone’s house, expect them to offer you food, desserts, or drinks. It is also expected for you to bring something. This can be desserts or wine usually. After you leave their house, it is also customary for you to invite them to your own house.

Listen to this beautiful song covered by Xaris Alexiou

Xaris Alexiou does a beautiful rendition of the song Barbagiannakakis. It seems that this video clips from a movie, so if anyone knows where it's from I would really appreciate it. I believe the song was originally written and sung by Andonis Diamantidis but I could be wrong, since many songs have just been passed around. This particular piece is a classic from Asia Minor.

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