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redsoxdw_

Active member
So many people have asked me why everything ends in "akis" and the truth is that it doesn't really! Akis is a suffix that is added to the end of greek words to make them "little" or more cute. It's also the ending of many Cretan last names. For example, dolma (grape leaves) is the official name but we just call them dolmadakia (akia is the plural of akis). You can add this to pretty much everything!
 
I hate to be that person, but I can't think of a word that would end in akis (ακης) except for male names like giannakis (Γιαννάκης) or adonakis (αδωνακης)

Aki generally means "small" and the gender is neuter, but not all words are allowed to end in aki because they may be feminine or masculine in gender (there are a few exceptions here). Some common endings for masculine and feminine words area itsa, oula/oulis, or akis (not the same as aki).

Geneeally speaking, there is no plural for these endings because in most instances you don't use them in the plural. That said, for food when using aki (ακι), the plural is akia (ακια), because whenever a Greek word ends in iota, you add alpha to the end to make it plural. So the plural of a few words ending in aki:
  1. dolmadaki (ντολμαδάκι) becomes dolmadakia (ντολμαδάκια)
  2. Spanakopitaki (σπανακοπιτακι) becomes spanakopitakia (σπανακοπιτακια)
  3. Pswmaki (ψωμάκι) becomes pswmakia (ψωμάκια)
  4. Neraki (νεράκι) becomes nerakia (νεράκια)
  5. Pitaki (πατάκι) becomes pitakia (πιτάκια)
But some words end in oula and since oula is a feminine ending, the plural of oula mus be changes to oules. For example
  1. Gatoula (γατούλα) becomes gatoules (γατούλες)
  2. Mikroula (μικρούλα) becomes mikroules (μικρούλες)
But with names it doesn't really work the same way, because you don't usually say them in the plural with these endings.
 

Tips for Learning and Teaching Greek

I know how to speak Greek okay, but I am not great at it. I want to brush up on my skills, and I also want to teach some of my family members. I am good enough at it to the learn the basics. I am looking for advice, but I've also compiled some ideas:

1. Spend an extended period of time in Greece

There’s no better way to learn Greek than to immerse yourself in the language and culture of Greece. If you have the opportunity, consider spending an extended time in Greece, studying or working, taking a sabbatical, or just exploring the country. Living in Greece can help you understand the nuances of the language, such as the different accents, dialects, and slang that are used. You’ll also have the chance to practice your Greek with locals, watch Greek TV or films, and read Greek books or newspapers. I would imagine this is the best way to learn fast!

2. Use a language program

If you can’t travel to Greece or you prefer a more structured approach to learning Greek, consider using a language program. There are many language programs available online or in your local area, ranging from self-paced courses to interactive classes. Some popular language programs for Greek include Rosetta Stone, Duolingo, and Pimsleur. From what I understand these are all great options and I can learn at my own pace.

3. Take classes

Taking classes is another excellent way to learn Greek, especially if you prefer face-to-face interaction and feedback. You can find Greek language classes in community colleges, universities, language schools, or private tutors. Taking classes can help you improve your Greek skills, such as listening, speaking, reading, and writing. You’ll have a teacher who can guide you through the learning process, answer your questions, and give you homework or assignments that challenge you. You’ll also have classmates who share your passion for Greek and can practice with you.

4. Find ways to immerse yourself outside of Greece

Even if you can’t go to Greece or attend classes, you can still immerse yourself in Greek in your daily life. One way is to find Greek-speaking communities or events in your area, such as cultural centers, festivals, or meetups. You can also use online resources to connect with Greek speakers, such as language exchange websites, social media groups, or chat apps. Listening to Greek music, watching Greek videos or podcasts, or reading Greek literature can also help you familiarize yourself with the sounds and patterns of the language.

Honestly, I plan to try all 4 - whatever I can do. I think it will all help.

Learning about hospitality in Greece

I was trying to explain to some non-Greek friends about hospitality in Greece. I feel like it's next level, but how do you explain it?

Could anyone help me explain any of the following:
  • Traditional welcome gestures in Greece
  • Common household customs when visiting a Greek home
  • Etiquette for showing appreciation to Greek hosts
  • Any specific do's and don'ts that a foreigner should be aware of

Greek Name Days Celebrations

I have been encouraging my family and friends to let me know when their name days are. I know for my immediate family, of course, but I want to start honoring name days in addition to birthdays like they do in Greece.

But aside from wishing someone Chronia Polla, or happy name day, what else can we do? How do people in Greece celebrate? Is it much like a birthday?

Advice about making Greek coffee

I've developed a fascination with Greek culture and cuisine, and one aspect I'm particularly eager to explore is Greek coffee. I've heard that it's a unique and delicious brew, but I'm not quite sure how to make it at home.

I understand that Greek coffee is traditionally prepared using a special pot called a briki, but beyond that, I'm a bit lost. What type of coffee grounds should I use, and how finely should they be ground? Are there any specific brands or blends that are favored for making Greek coffee?

I'm also curious about the brewing process itself. Is there a particular technique for achieving that rich, foamy texture that Greek coffee is known for? And what about serving suggestions? Are there any traditional accompaniments or customs that I should be aware of?

Thanks in advance!

Ideas for Celebrating the New Month - Kalo Mina

Growing up, I heard my family say this all the time when there was a new month. I finally started paying attention to the tradition and ritual of saying it.

Kalo Mina actually means "Good Month" but my family took it a step further. We developed the habit of doing something special as a family to celebrate.It depends which day it falls. Some things we've done:

- Brunch - We do this if it falls on a weekend.
- Dinner - Going out to dinner is great any time of the year!
- Journaling - We've done family journaling parties, sitting together reflecting on the month. Sometimes we read aloud what we write (depends how the month went LOL)
- Goals - No matter if we do anything, like go out to dinner or brunch, we always sit and review our goals for the month together.
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

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