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d_kakavouli

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I would love to experience the Greek Kalanda tradition for myself in Greece. Does anyone have any advice on how to make that happen this year? I plan to go to Greece in a few weeks to visit some people and hope to see this first-hand. It seems like a really great tradition.
 
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I would love to experience the Greek Kalanda tradition for myself in Greece. Does anyone have any advice on how to make that happen this year? I plan to go to Greece in a few weeks to visit some people and hope to see this first-hand. It seems like a really great tradition.
Do you know that I have never actually done it? I am not sure where to start. Maybe someone with experience can chime in here...
 
You might see some caroling in syntagma on ermou, but if you really want to experience it then you need to be in the neighborhoods where locals live. Kids make the most money there by going door-to-door to sing carols
 
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You might see some caroling in syntagma on ermou, but if you really want to experience it then you need to be in the neighborhoods where locals live. Kids make the most money there by going door-to-door to sing carols
Oh! I understand - unless I can experience the feeling of when the kids come to the door, I won't really experience the whole thing. Thank you!
 

Greek family customs - Personal related

Hi there. Not sure if this is the right forum, but I've got some personal issues with my family. My brother in law (73) is Greek. His wife (my sister) is not. They have a daughter (34) (my niece) that "sides" more with the Greek culture.

My niece has never left home, and has never paid rent or paid for food. She's been mostly jobless although she has worked a few jobs here and there. My sister is fed up with it, but when she confronts my BIL, he says "Greeks don't do that". And what he is implying (I guess) is that Greeks take care of their family in this way.

My BIL had a stroke many years ago and his health is declining rapidly. I am advocating for an attendant to come into the house every day and get him dressed, showered, make him meals, etc. My sister is 73 and she can't physically handle this. She also doesn't want to devote every waking moment to keeping an eye on him. When she suggests an attendant, again, "Greeks don't do that".

Now I'm pretty sure this is all BS, but would love to get some input from any Greek people in this forum.

Tips for Learning and Teaching Greek

I know how to speak Greek okay, but I am not great at it. I want to brush up on my skills, and I also want to teach some of my family members. I am good enough at it to the learn the basics. I am looking for advice, but I've also compiled some ideas:

1. Spend an extended period of time in Greece

There’s no better way to learn Greek than to immerse yourself in the language and culture of Greece. If you have the opportunity, consider spending an extended time in Greece, studying or working, taking a sabbatical, or just exploring the country. Living in Greece can help you understand the nuances of the language, such as the different accents, dialects, and slang that are used. You’ll also have the chance to practice your Greek with locals, watch Greek TV or films, and read Greek books or newspapers. I would imagine this is the best way to learn fast!

2. Use a language program

If you can’t travel to Greece or you prefer a more structured approach to learning Greek, consider using a language program. There are many language programs available online or in your local area, ranging from self-paced courses to interactive classes. Some popular language programs for Greek include Rosetta Stone, Duolingo, and Pimsleur. From what I understand these are all great options and I can learn at my own pace.

3. Take classes

Taking classes is another excellent way to learn Greek, especially if you prefer face-to-face interaction and feedback. You can find Greek language classes in community colleges, universities, language schools, or private tutors. Taking classes can help you improve your Greek skills, such as listening, speaking, reading, and writing. You’ll have a teacher who can guide you through the learning process, answer your questions, and give you homework or assignments that challenge you. You’ll also have classmates who share your passion for Greek and can practice with you.

4. Find ways to immerse yourself outside of Greece

Even if you can’t go to Greece or attend classes, you can still immerse yourself in Greek in your daily life. One way is to find Greek-speaking communities or events in your area, such as cultural centers, festivals, or meetups. You can also use online resources to connect with Greek speakers, such as language exchange websites, social media groups, or chat apps. Listening to Greek music, watching Greek videos or podcasts, or reading Greek literature can also help you familiarize yourself with the sounds and patterns of the language.

Honestly, I plan to try all 4 - whatever I can do. I think it will all help.

Ideas for Celebrating the New Month - Kalo Mina

Growing up, I heard my family say this all the time when there was a new month. I finally started paying attention to the tradition and ritual of saying it.

Kalo Mina actually means "Good Month" but my family took it a step further. We developed the habit of doing something special as a family to celebrate.It depends which day it falls. Some things we've done:

- Brunch - We do this if it falls on a weekend.
- Dinner - Going out to dinner is great any time of the year!
- Journaling - We've done family journaling parties, sitting together reflecting on the month. Sometimes we read aloud what we write (depends how the month went LOL)
- Goals - No matter if we do anything, like go out to dinner or brunch, we always sit and review our goals for the month together.

Advice about making Greek coffee

I've developed a fascination with Greek culture and cuisine, and one aspect I'm particularly eager to explore is Greek coffee. I've heard that it's a unique and delicious brew, but I'm not quite sure how to make it at home.

I understand that Greek coffee is traditionally prepared using a special pot called a briki, but beyond that, I'm a bit lost. What type of coffee grounds should I use, and how finely should they be ground? Are there any specific brands or blends that are favored for making Greek coffee?

I'm also curious about the brewing process itself. Is there a particular technique for achieving that rich, foamy texture that Greek coffee is known for? And what about serving suggestions? Are there any traditional accompaniments or customs that I should be aware of?

Thanks in advance!

Learning about hospitality in Greece

I was trying to explain to some non-Greek friends about hospitality in Greece. I feel like it's next level, but how do you explain it?

Could anyone help me explain any of the following:
  • Traditional welcome gestures in Greece
  • Common household customs when visiting a Greek home
  • Etiquette for showing appreciation to Greek hosts
  • Any specific do's and don'ts that a foreigner should be aware of
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

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