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d_kakavouli

Active member
I love Halva year round but I often see it a lot during Lent. My recipe doesn't seem Lent friendly to me. Any ideas on how I can adapt it?

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup semolina
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup chopped almonds or walnuts (optional)
  • 1/4 cup raisins (optional)
Instructions:
  1. In a medium-sized saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat.
  2. Add the semolina to the melted butter and stir continuously for about 5-7 minutes, or until the semolina turns golden brown and begins to emit a nutty aroma.
  3. While stirring the semolina mixture, gradually add the sugar and continue to cook for another 2-3 minutes until the sugar is fully incorporated.
  4. Slowly pour in the water, stirring constantly to avoid lumps from forming. Be careful as the mixture may splatter.
  5. Reduce the heat to low and continue stirring the mixture until it thickens to a porridge-like consistency, about 5-7 minutes.
  6. Stir in the ground cinnamon and optional chopped nuts and raisins, if using.
  7. Remove the saucepan from the heat and let the halva rest for a few minutes to thicken further.
  8. Serve the halva warm or at room temperature, either as a dessert or a sweet breakfast treat.
 
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I love Halva year round but I often see it a lot during Lent. My recipe doesn't seem Lent friendly to me. Any ideas on how I can adapt it?

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup semolina
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup chopped almonds or walnuts (optional)
  • 1/4 cup raisins (optional)
Instructions:
  1. In a medium-sized saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat.
  2. Add the semolina to the melted butter and stir continuously for about 5-7 minutes, or until the semolina turns golden brown and begins to emit a nutty aroma.
  3. While stirring the semolina mixture, gradually add the sugar and continue to cook for another 2-3 minutes until the sugar is fully incorporated.
  4. Slowly pour in the water, stirring constantly to avoid lumps from forming. Be careful as the mixture may splatter.
  5. Reduce the heat to low and continue stirring the mixture until it thickens to a porridge-like consistency, about 5-7 minutes.
  6. Stir in the ground cinnamon and optional chopped nuts and raisins, if using.
  7. Remove the saucepan from the heat and let the halva rest for a few minutes to thicken further.
  8. Serve the halva warm or at room temperature, either as a dessert or a sweet breakfast treat.
Hi, there! I have a Lenten Halva recipe that's really simple to make! You can check out the recipe here. Let me know what you think!
 

Greek methods of food preservation?

I remember my family doing some things to preserve food as I was growing up but we got away from them. The thing is, some of the options were actually delicious! My yiayia made sun-dried tomatoes, spoon sweets, her own tomato paste, etc. It was one of the things that made her food delicious.

I am trying to figure out what she did! I am curious if anyone knows anything about the following:

- Traditional Techniques: I know the ancient Greeks did a lot of preserving and some of the methods translate to modern?
- Modern Adaptations to Old Techniques: Maybe to make the process easier?
- Local Variations: Are there different regional things?

Roundup of Easy Recipes to Start Cooking Greek Food

I know a lot of people who want to start cooking Greek food but are intimidated. I want to help them out by brainstorming a list of "easy win" foods to get started making.

Here's what I have - do you have anything to add?

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  • Greek Lemon Chicken
  • Greek Lemon Potatoes
  • Souvlaki
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  • Grilled Halloumi cheese
  • Fasolakia
  • Briam
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With Greek Easter just around the corner, I'm getting excited to celebrate with family and friends. One of my favorite parts of this holiday is the delicious feast we enjoy together. I'm curious to hear what dishes everyone serves at their Greek Easter gatherings.

Whether you have cherished family recipes passed down through generations or you're trying something new this year, I'd love to hear about it. From traditional favorites like lamb and tzatziki to mouthwatering desserts like baklava and tsoureki, every dish adds to the festive atmosphere.

So, what's on your Greek Easter menu this year? Are there any must-have dishes or special treats that you look forward to? Feel free to share recipes, tips, or simply your excitement for the upcoming celebration. Let's swap ideas and inspire each other to make this Greek Easter memorable!

Us? We are grilling a leg of lamb and serving it with lemon potatoes and fasolakia. For dessert we are doing some kind of a chocolate cake and of course koulourakia.

Best way to make saganaki?

I went to a restaurant the other day and they lit the saganaki on fire! When I make saganaki at home, I don't do that - mainly because my recipe doesn't call for it.

How does one incorporate the fire into creating the dish?

From what I can tell, the restaurant prepares the saganaki and then before they bring it out, I think they douse it in ouzo and let it with a torch on the way to the table.

It's a fun thing to watch. It kind of freaks me out at home - mainly because I would be merely guessing at this point. Any ideas?

What is the best street food in Greece?

What do you consider the best street food in Greece? Are there any specific dishes or local delicacies that you dream of having again? Also, if you have recommendations for particular places or vendors, that would be fantastic!

Here's what I've got on my list so far:
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  • Gyros
  • Loukoumades
  • Spanakopita
  • Bougatsa
But I'd like to go beyond the usual and try the real local flavors that might not be as famous internationally. I'm open to suggestions from all over Greece. I have an idea of what I like but want to see what others say.
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