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paharo45

Active member
I love this dessert - I had it in Greece but I've been trying to find a recipe. To those of you who make it, does this look right? I question the sweetened condensed milk

  • 10 oz of dark chocolate
  • 4 oz of unsalted butter
  • 6 oz of sweetened condensed milk
  • 9 oz of biscuits (such as Marie biscuits)
  • 1/4 cup of water
  • 1 tsp of vanilla extract

To start, break the biscuits into small uneven pieces and set them aside. Next, add the chocolate, butter, and sweetened condensed milk into a double boiler and stir continuously until everything is melted and well combined.

Once everything is melted, add the biscuit pieces into the chocolate mixture and mix well to ensure that all the biscuit pieces are well coated. Transfer the mixture into a greased baking pan, spreading it evenly using a spatula.

Next, in a small pan, heat 1/4 cup of water and bring it to a boil. Once boiled, add in the vanilla extract and mix well. Pour this mixture over the chocolate mixture in the baking pan.

Place the baking pan in the fridge and let it chill for at least 3 hours or until the dessert sets completely. Once set, take the dessert out of the pan and cut it into small squares or rectangle shapes.

The Greek Chocolate Mosaiko dessert is perfect to serve for any occasion. You can sprinkle some powdered sugar or cocoa powder on top of each square for added sweetness and decoration.

greek-chocolate-log-dessert.jpg
 
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I have always admired this dessert and thought it was delicious. They serve this at cafes in Greece a lot, sometimes o the house when you get a coffee. I never thought it would be this easy to actually make it! Thanks for sharing the recipe.
 
I love this dessert - I had it in Greece but I've been trying to find a recipe. To those of you who make it, does this look right? I question the sweetened condensed milk

  • 10 oz of dark chocolate
  • 4 oz of unsalted butter
  • 6 oz of sweetened condensed milk
  • 9 oz of biscuits (such as Marie biscuits)
  • 1/4 cup of water
  • 1 tsp of vanilla extract

To start, break the biscuits into small uneven pieces and set them aside. Next, add the chocolate, butter, and sweetened condensed milk into a double boiler and stir continuously until everything is melted and well combined.

Once everything is melted, add the biscuit pieces into the chocolate mixture and mix well to ensure that all the biscuit pieces are well coated. Transfer the mixture into a greased baking pan, spreading it evenly using a spatula.

Next, in a small pan, heat 1/4 cup of water and bring it to a boil. Once boiled, add in the vanilla extract and mix well. Pour this mixture over the chocolate mixture in the baking pan.

Place the baking pan in the fridge and let it chill for at least 3 hours or until the dessert sets completely. Once set, take the dessert out of the pan and cut it into small squares or rectangle shapes.

The Greek Chocolate Mosaiko dessert is perfect to serve for any occasion. You can sprinkle some powdered sugar or cocoa powder on top of each square for added sweetness and decoration.

View attachment 1235
Hi! Here in Greece there are different versions of Mosaiko and it's often Lenten (vegan). Some make it with cocoa powder, but I have a recipe
I love this dessert - I had it in Greece but I've been trying to find a recipe. To those of you who make it, does this look right? I question the sweetened condensed milk

  • 10 oz of dark chocolate
  • 4 oz of unsalted butter
  • 6 oz of sweetened condensed milk
  • 9 oz of biscuits (such as Marie biscuits)
  • 1/4 cup of water
  • 1 tsp of vanilla extract

To start, break the biscuits into small uneven pieces and set them aside. Next, add the chocolate, butter, and sweetened condensed milk into a double boiler and stir continuously until everything is melted and well combined.

Once everything is melted, add the biscuit pieces into the chocolate mixture and mix well to ensure that all the biscuit pieces are well coated. Transfer the mixture into a greased baking pan, spreading it evenly using a spatula.

Next, in a small pan, heat 1/4 cup of water and bring it to a boil. Once boiled, add in the vanilla extract and mix well. Pour this mixture over the chocolate mixture in the baking pan.

Place the baking pan in the fridge and let it chill for at least 3 hours or until the dessert sets completely. Once set, take the dessert out of the pan and cut it into small squares or rectangle shapes.

The Greek Chocolate Mosaiko dessert is perfect to serve for any occasion. You can sprinkle some powdered sugar or cocoa powder on top of each square for added sweetness and decoration.

View attachment 1235
Here in Greece you'll find different versions for Mosaiko, most don't use condensed milk. Some use only cocoa powder, but I have a Mosaiko recipe where I use chocolate, instead. I also have a Mosaiko Cake, which I call Lazy Cake. It's a mosaiko in cake form!
 

Learning about Greek wines

Greek wines offer a window into the country's rich traditions. I have been taking the time to learn more about it lately!

Greek wine history dates back over 4,000 years, intertwined with myths and traditions where wine was celebrated as a gift from the gods. Today, Greece's unique climate, diverse soils, and indigenous grape varieties contribute to the production of wines with distinct character and quality.

Indigenous Varieties to Know:
  1. Assyrtiko: Originally from Santorini, this white grape is all about minerality, crisp acidity, and lemony flavors, making it a perfect companion for seafood.
  2. Agiorgitiko: One of the most important red varieties, primarily grown in the Peloponnese. It produces wines ranging from soft and fruity to full-bodied and age-worthy.
  3. Xinomavro: Often referred to as the "Barolo of Greece," this red grape from Northern Greece offers complex aromas and a strong tannic presence, ideal for aging.
  4. Moschofilero: A highly aromatic white variety, yielding wines that are fresh and floral with lively acidity, hailing from the cool-climate region of Mantinia.
  5. Retsina: While not a grape variety, no discussion on Greek wine can be complete without mentioning Retsina, a traditional white or rosé wine flavored with pine resin. A contemporary approach to Retsina has given it a much-needed makeover, making it an intriguing option worth revisiting.

Did I miss any wines? I am guessing I did...

greek-wine.jpg

Cooking Greek Style Octopus

One of the things I like about Greek cuisine is the octopus! It's so tender and flavorful. I get it a lot when I am in Greece and only a few times in the United States. I want to learn how to do that. In particular I want to know:
  • Choosing the Right Octopus: What should I look for when buying octopus? Are there any specific types or sizes that work best?
  • Tenderizing Process: I’ve heard that tenderizing the octopus is crucial. What methods do you recommend? I’ve heard of everything from beating it to simmering it in a pot. What works best?
  • Cooking Techniques: Should I grill it, bake it, or cook it in a stew? I'm aiming for something that's traditionally Greek.
  • Marination and Seasonings: What are the best herbs, spices, or marination techniques to use? I know olive oil and lemon are staples, but are there any other must-have seasonings?
Any advice you can give is welcome!

Corn Dishes from Greece

I noticed in Greece while I was there last that there is actually corn! Does it grow in Greece? I think I read somewhere that it grows in Northern Greece, but I have never been.

Does anyone know if there are some Greek traditional dishes that involve corn? I know that we can get street corn in the summer (and it's delicious), but I am not sure what Greeks would actually do with it. I am pretty sure it's not native to Greece, but I do see corn sometimes here and there on menus while in Greece.

Usually I am on the mainland when this happens, but like I said, I have never been to Northern Greece.

Using Greek Yogurt in Cooking

I love eating Greek yogurt with a little honey and sometimes walnuts in the morning for breakfast. You an cook with it, too! I thought I'd make a list of some of my favorite ways to use it to share with you all. How do you like to cook with Greek yogurt?
  1. Marinades: Yogurt is a fantastic meat tenderizer. Mixing it with herbs and spices for a marinade not only imparts flavors but also ensures meats like lamb and chicken come out tender and juicy.
  2. Tzatziki: This classic Greek dip combines yogurt with cucumbers, garlic, salt, olive oil, and sometimes lemon vinegar or dill, creating a perfectly cool and refreshing side that pairs wonderfully with grilled meats.
  3. Baking: Yogurt can be added to cakes or pastries, providing moisture and a slight tanginess that complements the sweetness of the desserts.
  4. Soups: It’s also a thickening agent for traditional soups, adding a hint of tanginess and creaminess without overpowering the main ingredients.
  5. Sauces: Beyond tzatziki, yogurt serves as a base for various sauces, enhancing the flavors of vegetables and meats.

What is tsipouro?

Today, I'm curious to learn more about a Greek spirit that's caught my attention — Tsipouro. Often mentioned alongside other legendary beverages like Ouzo, Tsipouro seems to be a significant part of Greek culinary and social tradition, yet it doesn't seem to have the same international fame.

From what little I've gathered, Tsipouro is a strong distilled spirit made from grape pomace, the residue left after wine production. But my understanding barely scratches the surface. I am curious first of all if this is the same thing as Raki on Crete. Also, on Crete I had Raki with honey - can you do that with Tsipouro?

tsipouro-greek-spirit.jpg
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